fallacious


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Related to fallacious: Fallacious argument, fallacious reasoning

fal·la·cious

 (fə-lā′shəs)
adj.
1. Containing or based on a fallacy: a fallacious assumption.
2. Tending to mislead; deceptive: fallacious testimony.

fal·la′cious·ly adv.
fal·la′cious·ness n.

fallacious

(fəˈleɪʃəs)
adj
1. (Logic) containing or involving a fallacy; illogical; erroneous
2. tending to mislead
3. delusive or disappointing: a fallacious hope.
falˈlaciously adv
falˈlaciousness n

fal•la•cious

(fəˈleɪ ʃəs)

adj.
1. containing a fallacy; logically unsound: fallacious arguments.
2. deceptive; misleading.
[1500–10; < Latin fallāx deceitful]
fal•la′cious•ly, adv.
fal•la′cious•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fallacious - containing or based on a fallacyfallacious - containing or based on a fallacy; "fallacious reasoning"; "an unsound argument"
invalid - having no cogency or legal force; "invalid reasoning"; "an invalid driver's license"
2.fallacious - intended to deceive; "deceitful advertising"; "fallacious testimony"; "smooth, shining, and deceitful as thin ice" - S.T.Coleridge; "a fraudulent scheme to escape paying taxes"
dishonest, dishonorable - deceptive or fraudulent; disposed to cheat or defraud or deceive
3.fallacious - based on an incorrect or misleading notion or information; "fallacious hope"
incorrect, wrong - not correct; not in conformity with fact or truth; "an incorrect calculation"; "the report in the paper is wrong"; "your information is wrong"; "the clock showed the wrong time"; "found themselves on the wrong road"; "based on the wrong assumptions"

fallacious

adjective incorrect, wrong, mistaken, false, misleading, untrue, deceptive, spurious, fictitious, illogical, erroneous, illusory, delusive, delusory, sophistic, sophistical Their argument is fallacious.
Quotations
"The conclusion of your syllogism, I said lightly, is fallacious, being based upon licensed premises" [Flann O'Brien At Swim-Two-Birds]

fallacious

adjective
1. Containing fundamental errors in reasoning:
2. Containing an error or errors:
Idioms: all wet, in error, off base, off the mark.
3. Tending to lead one into error:
Translations
خَدّاع، مُضَلِّل
klamnýmylný
falskfejlagtig
villandi; rangur, órökréttur
mylný

fallacious

[fəˈleɪʃəs] ADJ (= incorrect) → erróneo; (= misleading) → engañoso, falaz

fallacious

[fəˈleɪʃəs] (formal) adj [idea, argument, reason] → fallacieux/euse

fallacious

adjirrig; argumenttrugschlüssig

fallacious

[fəˈleɪʃs] adj (frm) → fallace

fallacy

(ˈfӕləsi) plural ˈfallacies noun
a wrong idea or belief, usually one that is generally believed to be true; false reasoning. That belief is just a fallacy.
fallacious (fəˈleiʃəs) adjective
wrong, mistaken or showing false reasoning. a fallacious argument.
References in classic literature ?
And equally fallacious seems the conceit, that because the so-called whale-bone whales no longer haunt many grounds in former years abounding with them, hence that species also is declining.
We have turned our attention to that experiment, on the suggestion of my family, and we find it fallacious.
Of good and evil much they argu'd then, Of happiness and final misery, Passion and Apathie, and glory and shame, Vain wisdom all, and false Philosophie: Yet with a pleasing sorcerie could charm Pain for a while or anguish, and excite Fallacious hope, or arm th' obdured brest With stubborn patience as with triple steel.
Such were the consequences of the fallacious principle on which this interesting establishment was founded.
Alas," said Edmond, smiling, "these are the treasures the cardinal has left; and the good abbe, seeing in a dream these glittering walls, has indulged in fallacious hopes.
Such methods argue, therefore, weakness in the prince, because these factions will never be permitted in a vigorous principality; such methods for enabling one the more easily to manage subjects are only useful in times of peace, but if war comes this policy proves fallacious.
The anchor is an emblem of hope, but a foul anchor is worse than the most fallacious of false hopes that ever lured men or nations into a sense of security.
We traveled entirely by compass, and once or twice there were differences of opinion between Challenger and the two Indians, when, to quote the Professor's indignant words, the whole party agreed to "trust the fallacious instincts of undeveloped savages rather than the highest product of modern European culture.
But those who have their wives and children in common will not say so, but all will say so, though not as individuals; therefore, to use the word all is evidently a fallacious mode of speech; for this word is sometimes used distributively, and sometimes collectively, on account of its double meaning, and is the cause of inconclusive syllogisms in reasoning.
But the mind of man not only refuses to believe this explanation, but plainly says that this method of explanation is fallacious, because in it a weaker phenomenon is taken as the cause of a stronger.
Fred gave up the fallacious hope of getting a genuine opinion; but on reflection he saw that Bambridge's depreciation and Horrock's silence were both virtually encouraging, and indicated that they thought better of the horse than they chose to say.
SO spake the Son of God; and Satan stood A while as mute, confounded what to say, What to reply, confuted and convinced Of his weak arguing and fallacious drift; At length, collecting all his serpent wiles, With soothing words renewed, him thus accosts:-- "I see thou know'st what is of use to know, What best to say canst say, to do canst do; Thy actions to thy words accord; thy words To thy large heart give utterance due; thy heart Contains of good, wise, just, the perfet shape.