falls


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An·gel Fall

or Falls  (ān′jəl)
A waterfall in southeast Venezuela. At 979 m (3,212 ft) high, it is the highest waterfall in the world.

fall

 (fôl)
v. fell (fĕl), fall·en (fô′lən), fall·ing, falls
v.intr.
1. To drop or come down freely under the influence of gravity: Leaves fell from the tree.
2.
a. To drop oneself to a lower or less erect position: I fell back in my chair. The pilgrims fell to their knees.
b. To lose an upright or erect position suddenly: tripped and fell.
c. To drop wounded or dead, especially in battle.
3.
a. To hang down: The child's hair fell in ringlets.
b. To be cast down: Her eyes fell.
c. To be directed toward or come into contact; rest: My gaze fell upon the letter. The light fell on my book.
4.
a. To come into existence or occur as if by falling: A plague fell on the town. Night fell quickly.
b. To occur at a specified time or place: The holiday falls on a Thursday. The stress falls on the last syllable.
5.
a. To be removed as if by falling: All grief fell from our hearts.
b. To come forth as if by falling; issue: Did any thanks fall from their lips?
6. To assume an expression of consternation or disappointment: His face fell when he heard the report.
7.
a. To undergo conquest or capture, especially as the result of an armed attack: The city fell after a long siege.
b. To experience defeat or ruin: The home team fell to the visitors. After 300 years the dynasty fell.
c. To lose office: The disgraced prime minister fell from power.
8.
a. To move downward to a lower level; be reduced: The tide fell.
b. To slope downward: The land falls gently toward the sea.
9.
a. To become less in amount or degree: The air pressure is falling.
b. To diminish in pitch or volume: My friend's voice fell to a whisper.
c. To decline in financial value: Last year, stocks fell sharply.
10.
a. To give into temptation; suffer a moral lapse.
b. Theology To lose primordial innocence and happiness. Used of humanity as a result of the Fall.
11. To pass into a particular state, condition, or situation: fell silent; fall in love.
12. To come, as by chance: fell among a band of thieves.
13.
a. To be given by assignment or distribution: The greatest task fell to me.
b. To be given by right or inheritance.
14. To be included within the range or scope of something: The specimens fall into three categories.
15. To apply oneself: fell to work immediately.
16. To be born. Used chiefly of lambs.
v.tr.
To cut down (a tree); fell.
n.
1. The act or an instance of falling.
2. A sudden drop from a relatively erect to a less erect position.
3.
a. Something that has fallen: a fall of snow.
b. An amount that has fallen: a fall of two inches of rain.
c. The distance that something falls: The victim suffered a fall of three stories to the ground.
4. Autumn.
5. falls(used with a sing. or pl. verb) A waterfall.
6. A downward movement or slope.
7. Any of several pendent articles of dress, especially:
a. A veil hung from a woman's hat and down her back.
b. An ornamental cascade of lace or trimming attached to a dress, usually at the collar.
c. A woman's hairpiece with long, free-hanging hair.
8.
a. An overthrow; a collapse: the fall of a government.
b. Armed capture of a place under siege: the fall of Troy.
9.
a. A reduction in value, amount, or degree: a fall in housing prices.
b. A marked, often sudden, decline in status, rank, or importance: his fall from power.
10.
a. A moral lapse.
b. often Fall Theology The loss of humanity's original innocence and happiness resulting from Adam and Eve's eating of the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden.
11. Sports
a. The act of holding a wrestling opponent on his or her back so that the shoulders remain in contact with the mat for a designated period, usually one or two seconds, thereby winning the match. Also called pin.
b. Any of various wrestling maneuvers resulting in such an act.
12. Nautical
a. A break or rise in the level of a deck.
b. falls The apparatus used to hoist and transfer cargo or lifeboats.
13. The end of a cable, rope, or chain that is pulled by the power source in hoisting.
14.
a. The birth of an animal, especially a lamb.
b. All the animals born at one birth; a litter.
c. A family of woodcock in flight.
15. Botany One of the outer, drooping segments of a flower, especially an iris.
adj.
1. Of, having to do with, occurring in, or appropriate to the season of fall: fall fashion; fall harvests.
2. Grown during the season of fall: fall crops.
Phrasal Verbs:
fall apart
1. To break down; collapse: The rickety chair fell apart.
2. To suffer a nervous breakdown or become unable to cope: He fell apart after years as a POW.
fall away
1. To diminish gradually in size, amount, or intensity: The sound of the car fell away into the distance.
2. To change from an established course or activity: I fell away from my school work and spent more time writing.
3. To drop off or become steeper at a distance.
fall back
1. To give ground; retreat.
2. To recede: The waves fell back.
fall behind
1. To fail to keep up a pace; lag behind.
2. To be financially in arrears.
fall down
To fail to meet expectations; lag in performance: fell down on the job.
fall for
1. To feel love for; be in love with.
2. To be deceived or swindled by: fell for the con artist's scheme and lost $200,000.
fall in
1. To take one's place in a military formation.
2. To sink inward; cave in: The roof of the old barn fell in.
fall off
1. To become less; decrease: Stock prices have fallen off. The number of staff meetings fell off after a few months.
2. To lose weight. Used of livestock: Toward the end of the dry season, the cattle fall off rapidly.
3. Nautical To change course to leeward.
fall on (or upon)
1. To attack suddenly and viciously: Snipers and irregulars fell on the hapless patrol.
2. To meet with; encounter: a stockbroker who fell on hard times.
fall out
1.
a. To leave a barracks, for example, in order to take one's place in a military formation.
b. To leave a military formation.
2. To quarrel: The siblings fell out over their inheritance.
3. To happen; occur: What fell out while we were gone?
4. To be readily explainable; follow logically or naturally: These facts fall out nicely from the new theory.
fall through
To fail; miscarry: Our plans fell through at the last minute.
fall to
To begin an activity energetically: "The press fell to with a will" (Russell Baker).
Idioms:
fall back on/upon
1. To rely on: fall back on old friends in time of need.
2. To resort to: I had to fall back on my savings when I was unemployed.
fall between (the) two stools
To fail because of an inability to reconcile or choose between two courses of action.
fall flat
1. To fail miserably when attempting to achieve a result.
2. To have no effect: The jokes fell flat.
fall foul/afoul
1. Nautical To collide. Used of vessels.
2. To clash: fell foul of the law.
fall from grace
To experience a major reduction in status or prestige.
fall into line
To adhere to established rules or predetermined courses of action.
fall in with
1. To agree with or be in harmony with: Their views fall in with ours.
2. To associate or begin to associate with: fell in with the wrong crowd.
fall on deaf ears
To go unheeded; be ignored completely: "Moscow's own familiar charges ... will also fall on deaf ears" (Foreign Affairs).
fall over backward/backwards
To overexert oneself to do or accomplish something: We fell over backward to complete the project on time.
fall over (oneself)
To display inordinate, typically effusive, enthusiasm: fell over themselves to impress the general's wife.
fall prey to
To be put into such a vulnerable position as to be at risk of harm, destruction, or invasion: a person who fell prey to swindlers; did not want the country to fall prey to terrorists.
fall short
1. To fail to attain a specified amount, level, or degree: an athlete whose skill fell far short of expectations.
2. To prove inadequate: Food supplies fell short.
fall through the cracks
To pass unnoticed, neglected, or unchecked: "In the past, many learning disabled children fell through the cracks" (Judith Harkness Richardson).
fall to pieces
1. To break apart; disintegrate or collapse.
2. To become distraught or lose one's ability to cope.

[Middle English fallen, from Old English feallan.]

falls

(fɔːlz)
pl n
(Physical Geography) a waterfall
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.falls - the petals or sepals of a flower that bend downward (especially the outer perianth of an iris)
chlamys, floral envelope, perianth, perigone, perigonium - collective term for the outer parts of a flower consisting of the calyx and corolla and enclosing the stamens and pistils
2.falls - a steep descent of the water of a riverfalls - a steep descent of the water of a river
body of water, water - the part of the earth's surface covered with water (such as a river or lake or ocean); "they invaded our territorial waters"; "they were sitting by the water's edge"
cascade - a small waterfall or series of small waterfalls
cataract - a large waterfall; violent rush of water over a precipice
river - a large natural stream of water (larger than a creek); "the river was navigable for 50 miles"
Translations
شَلالات، مَساقِط مائِيَّه
vodopády
vandfald
foss
slapovi
çağlayanşelâle

falls

[fɔːlz] npl (waterfall) → cascate fpl
the Niagara Falls → le cascate del Niagara

fall

(foːl) past tense fell (fel) : past participle ˈfallen verb
1. to go down from a higher level usually unintentionally. The apple fell from the tree; Her eye fell on an old book.
2. (often with over) to go down to the ground etc from an upright position, usually by accident. She fell (over).
3. to become lower or less. The temperature is falling.
4. to happen or occur. Easter falls early this year.
5. to enter a certain state or condition. She fell asleep; They fell in love.
6. (formal. only with it as subject) to come as one's duty etc: It falls to me to take care of the children.
noun
1. the act of falling. He had a fall.
2. (a quantity of) something that has fallen. a fall of snow.
3. capture or (political) defeat. the fall of Rome.
4. (American) the autumn. Leaves change colour in the fall.
falls noun plural
a waterfall. the Niagara Falls.
ˈfallout noun
radioactive dust from a nuclear explosion etc.
his/her etc face fell
he, she etc looked suddenly disappointed.
fall away
1. to become less in number. The crowd began to fall away.
2. to slope downwards. The ground fell away steeply.
fall back
to move back or stop moving forward.
fall back on
to use, or to go to for help, finally when everything else has been tried. Whatever happens you have your father's money to fall back on.
fall behind
1. to be slower than (someone else). Hurry up! You're falling behind (the others); He is falling behind in his schoolwork.
2. (with with) to become late in regular payment, letter-writing etc. Don't fall behind with the rent!
fall down (sometimes with on)
to fail (in). He's falling down on his job.
fall flat
(especially of jokes etc) to fail completely or to have no effect. Her joke fell flat.
fall for
1. to be deceived by (something). I made up a story to explain why I had not been at work and he fell for it.
2. to fall in love with (someone). He has fallen for your sister.
fall in with
1. to join with (someone) for company. On the way home we fell in with some friends.
2. to agree with (a plan, idea etc). They fell in with our suggestion.
fall off
to become smaller in number or amount. Audiences often fall off during the summer.
fall on/upon
to attack. The robbers fell on the old man and beat him; They fell hungrily upon the food.
fall out (sometimes with with)
to quarrel. I have fallen out with my sister.
fall short (often with of)
to be not enough or not good enough etc. The money we have falls short of what we need.
fall through
(of plans etc) to fail or come to nothing. Our plans fell through.
References in classic literature ?
Hugo, getting thirsty after a long warble, drinks it, loses his wits, and after a good deal of clutching and stamping, falls flat and dies, while Hagar informs him what she has done in a song of exquisite power and melody.
Look at this one over here, by the door here, where the light from the window falls on it.
They were, consequently, the first dispossessed; and the seemingly inevitable fate of all these people, who disappear before the advances, or it might be termed the inroads, of civilization, as the verdure of their native forests falls before the nipping frosts, is represented as having already befallen them.
I remained with my family on Clench until the sixth of June,1774, when I and one Michael Stoner were solicited by Governor Dunmore, of Virginia, to go to the Falls of the Ohio, to conduct into the settlement a number of surveyors that had been sent thither by him some months before; this country having about this time drawn the attention of many adventurers.
But this objection likewise falls to the ground, because a German exegetist supposes that Jonah must have taken refuge in the floating body of a dead whale -- even as the French soldiers in the Russian campaign turned their dead horses into tents, and crawled into them.
screams Marija Berczynskas, and falls to work herself-- for there is more upon the stove inside that will be spoiled if it be not eaten.
The citizen bids for a few turns, contemptuously measuring his opponent; but the bullet-head has the advantage over him, both in obstinacy and concealed length of purse, and the controversy lasts but a moment; the hammer falls,--he has got the girl, body and soul, unless God help her!
We can only grieve, and be resigned, and pray for the soul of him who falls unfairly by the arm of the law, and that his fel- lows may be few.
Again: if under the sudden anguish of a wound the receiver of it makes a grimace, he falls some degrees in the estimation of his fellows; his corps are ashamed of him: they call him "hare foot," which is the German equivalent for chicken-hearted.
These latter came out of a dozen rivers-- the Illinois, the Missouri, the Upper Mississippi, the Ohio, the Monongahela, the Tennessee, the Red River, the White River, and so on--and were bound every whither and stocked with every imaginable comfort or necessity, which the Mississippi's communities could want, from the frosty Falls of St.
And at last Joe, representing a whole tribe of weeping outlaws, dragged him sadly forth, gave his bow into his feeble hands, and Tom said, "Where this arrow falls, there bury poor Robin Hood under the green- wood tree.
Sparkling in the sunshine, gleaming under the summer moon, cold and gray beneath a November sky, trickling over the dam in some burning July drought, swollen with turbulent power in some April freshet, how many young eyes gazed into the mystery and majesty of the falls along that river, and how many young hearts dreamed out their futures leaning over the bridge rail, seeing "the vision splendid" reflected there and often, too, watching it fade into "the light of common day.