falsify


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fal·si·fy

 (fôl′sə-fī′)
v. fal·si·fied, fal·si·fy·ing, fal·si·fies
v.tr.
1. To state untruthfully; misrepresent.
2.
a. To make false by altering or adding to: falsify testimony.
b. To counterfeit; forge: falsify a visa.
3. To declare or prove to be false.
v.intr.
To make untrue statements; lie.

[Middle English falsifien, from Old French falsifier, from Late Latin falsificāre : Latin falsus, false; see false + Latin -ficāre, -fy.]

fal′si·fi·ca′tion (-fĭ-kā′shən) n.
fal′si·fi′er n.

falsify

(ˈfɔːlsɪˌfaɪ)
vb (tr) , -fies, -fying or -fied
1. to make (a report, evidence, accounts, etc) false or inaccurate by alteration, esp in order to deceive
2. to prove false; disprove
[C15: from Old French falsifier, from Late Latin falsificāre, from Latin falsus false + facere to make]
ˈfalsiˌfiable adj
falsification n
ˈfalsiˌfier n

fal•si•fy

(ˈfɔl sə faɪ)

v. -fied, -fy•ing. v.t.
1. to make false or incorrect, esp. so as to deceive: to falsify income-tax reports.
2. to fashion or alter fraudulently: to falsify a signature.
3. to represent falsely: to falsify one's family history.
4. to show or prove to be false; disprove; confute.
v.i.
5. to make false statements.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French falsifier < Late Latin falsificāre]
fal′si•fi`a•ble, adj.
fal•si•fi•ca•tion (ˈfɔl sə fɪˈkeɪ ʃən) n.
fal′si•fi`er, n.
syn: See misrepresent.

falsify


Past participle: falsified
Gerund: falsifying

Imperative
falsify
falsify
Present
I falsify
you falsify
he/she/it falsifies
we falsify
you falsify
they falsify
Preterite
I falsified
you falsified
he/she/it falsified
we falsified
you falsified
they falsified
Present Continuous
I am falsifying
you are falsifying
he/she/it is falsifying
we are falsifying
you are falsifying
they are falsifying
Present Perfect
I have falsified
you have falsified
he/she/it has falsified
we have falsified
you have falsified
they have falsified
Past Continuous
I was falsifying
you were falsifying
he/she/it was falsifying
we were falsifying
you were falsifying
they were falsifying
Past Perfect
I had falsified
you had falsified
he/she/it had falsified
we had falsified
you had falsified
they had falsified
Future
I will falsify
you will falsify
he/she/it will falsify
we will falsify
you will falsify
they will falsify
Future Perfect
I will have falsified
you will have falsified
he/she/it will have falsified
we will have falsified
you will have falsified
they will have falsified
Future Continuous
I will be falsifying
you will be falsifying
he/she/it will be falsifying
we will be falsifying
you will be falsifying
they will be falsifying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been falsifying
you have been falsifying
he/she/it has been falsifying
we have been falsifying
you have been falsifying
they have been falsifying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been falsifying
you will have been falsifying
he/she/it will have been falsifying
we will have been falsifying
you will have been falsifying
they will have been falsifying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been falsifying
you had been falsifying
he/she/it had been falsifying
we had been falsifying
you had been falsifying
they had been falsifying
Conditional
I would falsify
you would falsify
he/she/it would falsify
we would falsify
you would falsify
they would falsify
Past Conditional
I would have falsified
you would have falsified
he/she/it would have falsified
we would have falsified
you would have falsified
they would have falsified
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.falsify - make false by mutilation or addition; as of a message or story
murder, mutilate, mangle - alter so as to make unrecognizable; "The tourists murdered the French language"
misrepresent, belie - represent falsely; "This statement misrepresents my intentions"
2.falsify - tamper, with the purpose of deception; "Fudge the figures"; "cook the books"; "falsify the data"
chisel, cheat - engage in deceitful behavior; practice trickery or fraud; "Who's chiseling on the side?"
juggle - manipulate by or as if by moving around components; "juggle an account so as to hide a deficit"
3.falsify - prove false; "Falsify a claim"
confute, disprove - prove to be false; "The physicist disproved his colleagues' theories"
4.falsify - falsify knowingly; "She falsified the records"
change by reversal, reverse, turn - change to the contrary; "The trend was reversed"; "the tides turned against him"; "public opinion turned when it was revealed that the president had an affair with a White House intern"
correct, right, rectify - make right or correct; "Correct the mistakes"; "rectify the calculation"
5.falsify - insert words into texts, often falsifying it thereby
edit, redact - prepare for publication or presentation by correcting, revising, or adapting; "Edit a book on lexical semantics"; "she edited the letters of the politician so as to omit the most personal passages"

falsify

verb alter, forge, fake, tamper with, doctor, cook (slang), distort, pervert, belie, counterfeit, misrepresent, garble, misstate The charges against him include fraud, bribery, and falsifying business records.

falsify

verb
1. To make untrue declarations:
Law: perjure.
2. To impart a false character to (something) by alteration:
3. To give an inaccurate view of by representing falsely or misleadingly:
Idiom: give a false coloring to.
4. To make a fraudulent copy of:
Translations
يُزَيِّف
padělat
forfalske
osoittaavääräväärentää
falsa
falsificaretaroccare
çarpıtmakdeğiştirmek

falsify

[ˈfɔːlsɪfaɪ] VT [+ document] → falsificar; [+ evidence] → falsificar, falsear; [+ accounts, figures] → falsear

falsify

[ˈfɔːlsɪfaɪ] vt [+ records, documents, information, data] → falsifier; [+ accounts] → falsifier, maquiller

falsify

vt
records, evidence, historyfälschen; reportentstellen; results, testsverfälschen
(= disprove)widerlegen, falsifizieren (spec)

falsify

[ˈfɔːlsɪˌfaɪ] vtfalsificare; (figures) → alterare

false

(foːls) adjective
1. not true; not correct. He made a false statement to the police.
2. not genuine; intended to deceive. She has a false passport.
3. artificial. false teeth.
4. not loyal. false friends.
ˈfalsehood noun
(the telling of) a lie. She is incapable of (uttering a) falsehood.
ˈfalsify (-fӕi) verb
to make false. He falsified the accounts.
ˌfalsifiˈcation (-fi-) noun
ˈfalsity noun
false alarm
a warning of something which in fact does not happen.
false start
in a race, a start which is declared not valid and therefore has to be repeated.
References in classic literature ?
When you asked my permission some years ago to make use of my story, I at once said that you would be perfectly justified in giving it the fullest publicity whether I consented or not, provided only that you were careful not to falsify it for the sake of artistic effect.
That's how that thief of a sage, my enemy, can alter and falsify things," answered Don Quixote; "thou must know, Sancho, that it is a very easy matter for those of his sort to make us believe what they choose; and this malignant being who persecutes me, envious of the glory he knew I was to win in this battle, has turned the squadrons of the enemy into droves of sheep.
The first part commences with an apology for his colloquial style; he is, as he has always been, the enemy of rhetoric, and knows of no rhetoric but truth; he will not falsify his character by making a speech.
Strange that their very elevation was a misapplication, that to raise seemed to falsify.
But he had considered this step anew since our late confidence and had decided on taking it, if it only served to show me through one poor instance that the whole world would readily unite to falsify the stern prediction of my childhood.
They are generous by fits and starts--sometimes patrons, sometimes friends, sometimes masters, in this way they falsify the already false position of the poor children in whom they interest themselves, and trifle with the hearts, the lives, and futures of their protegees, whom they regard very lightly.
But we must not falsify observation to avoid theoretical difficulties.
Judge Deborah Sherwin said it had been fortunate that, driving tired, the drivers had not been involved in an accident but agreed, despite bosses being cleared of a conspiracy to falsify information, that the cabbies and bus drivers had felt under pressure to break the law, as they feared for their jobs.