family Fabaceae


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Noun1.family Fabaceae - a large family of trees, shrubs, vines, and herbs bearing bean podsfamily Fabaceae - a large family of trees, shrubs, vines, and herbs bearing bean pods; divided for convenience into the subfamilies Caesalpiniaceae; Mimosaceae; Papilionaceae
rosid dicot family - a family of dicotyledonous plants
legume, leguminous plant - an erect or climbing bean or pea plant of the family Leguminosae
Arachis, genus Arachis - a genus of plants with pods that ripen underground (see peanut)
Brya, genus Brya - genus of prickly shrubs and small trees of the Caribbean region; source of a durable hardwood
Centrolobium, genus Centrolobium - a genus of Centrolobium
Coumarouna, Dipteryx, genus Coumarouna, genus Dipteryx - tropical American trees: tonka beans
genus Hymenaea, Hymenaea - genus of tropical American timber trees
genus Melilotus - Old World herbs: the sweet clovers
genus Swainsona, Swainsona - a genus of Australian herbs and subshrubs: darling peas
genus Trifolium, Trifolium - any leguminous plant having leaves divided into three leaflets
family Mimosaceae, Mimosaceae - family of spiny woody plants (usually shrubs or small trees) whose leaves mimic animals in sensitivity to touch; commonly included in the family Leguminosae
Mimosoideae, subfamily Mimosoideae - alternative name used in some classification systems for the family Mimosaceae
genus Physostigma, Physostigma - African woody vines: calabar beans
Caesalpiniaceae, family Caesalpiniaceae - spiny trees, shrubs, or perennial herbs, including the genera Caesalpinia, Cassia, Ceratonia, Bauhinia; commonly included in the family Leguminosae
Caesalpinioideae, subfamily Caesalpinioideae - alternative name in some classification systems for the family Caesalpiniaceae
locust tree, locust - any of various hardwood trees of the family Leguminosae
genus Tamarindus, Tamarindus - widely cultivated tropical trees originally of Africa
family Papilionacea, Papilionaceae - leguminous plants whose flowers have butterfly-shaped corollas; commonly included in the family Leguminosae
Papilionoideae, subfamily Papilionoideae - alternative name used in some classification systems for the family Papilionaceae
wild pea - any of various plants of the family Leguminosae that usually grow like vines
bean plant, bean - any of various leguminous plants grown for their edible seeds and pods
order Rosales, Rosales - in some classifications this category does not include Leguminosae
References in periodicals archive ?
However, members of its subfamily Epilachninae are phytophagous and are pests of important agricultural crops belonging to the family Fabaceae and compositae (Dieke, 1947; Li and Cook, 1961).
also called as Dolichos bean or hyacinth bean belongs to the family Fabaceae and its native of India and mainly cultivated as an inter crop with cereals.
Soybean covers huge areas nearby the site where the insects were observed, and therefore this plant is located easily by them; Edessa species also are known to prefer plants of the family Fabaceae.
The genus Prosopis, which includes Prosopis velutina (mesquite), is also found within the family Fabaceae, subfamily Mimosoideae, and is native to the Asian, African and American continents.
Family Fabaceae (Pea family), is proven to be a plant that adapts to almost any landscape, through prolific self-seeding is renewable, contributes to critter and people habitats, is a relatively disease free minimal consumer of support resources; and perhaps more importantly, provides profuse spring bloom which inspires all to "dig in the dirt.
turcica possesses a valuable character in the breeding of fruit crops among the plant species of the family Fabaceae.
DISCUSSION--The high representation of the family Fabaceae agrees with the studies of Gonzalez et al.
Family Fabaceae contained highest number of plant species, represented by 12 taxa and was followed by monocot family Poaceae with 7 taxa, and dicot Asteraceae with 5 species.
On the palynomorphology of the species of the tribe Vicieae from the family Fabaceae.
The efficacy of a plant product based on extracts of the leaves of sage and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L, Family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae) was investigated in the treatment of hot flushes in an open trial of 12 weeks duration with 30 menopausal women (De Leo 1998).