family leave


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family leave

n.
Leave, especially unpaid leave as stipulated in US federal law, granted to an employee to care for a new baby or a sick family member or to attend to a medical condition that prevents the employee from performing his or her job.

fam′ily leave′


n.
an unpaid leave of absence from work in order to take care of a baby or an ailing family member.
[1990–95]
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 2 shows how family leave legislation is correlated with employer-provided family leave.
A FAMILY LEAVE ACT THAT LIMITS THE WATTAGE OF A SCROTUM TASER TO 1440 VOLTS:
Employers, too, shouldn't miss the roundup of detail, which covers everything from age discrimination and harassment on the job to denied health benefits, missed promotions, overtime pay, family leave and COBRA, and more.
federal law (under the Family and Medical Leave Act [FMLA]) requires 12 weeks of unpaid family leave for women in companies with at least 50 employees.
About 17% of employees had used family leave in the past 12 months, according to the Society for Human Resource Management's survey of 375 human resources professionals.
If a business is anticipating a drop in business and would like to cut payroll--but doesn't want to lose any employees--the Paid Family Leave Program can be a way to lower UI rates.
All employees can receive up to $5,000 per adopted child and 12 weeks of paid family leave for the primary caregiver.
Asked on the Today Show if he would repeal a paid family leave law, he said he had not heard the question.
This idea may seem radical to those who have seen the church respond either by ignoring the violent situation or by seeing the violent spouse and/or the family leave the congregation.
On September 23, California Governor Gray Davis signed SB 1661 establishing landmark family leave legislation.
who said on the House floor, "I don't think my support for family leave is aberrational, but rather it's consistent with traditional values"--as well as Chris Bond (R-Mo.