famine


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fam·ine

 (făm′ĭn)
n.
1. A drastic, wide-reaching food shortage.
2. A drastic shortage; a dearth.
3. Severe hunger; starvation.
4. Archaic Extreme appetite.

[Middle English, from Old French, from faim, hunger, from Latin famēs.]

famine

(ˈfæmɪn)
n
1. a severe shortage of food, as through crop failure or overpopulation
2. acute shortage of anything
3. violent hunger
[C14: from Old French, via Vulgar Latin, from Latin famēs hunger]

fam•ine

(ˈfæm ɪn)

n.
1. extreme and general scarcity of food, esp. within a large geographical area.
2. any extreme scarcity.
3. Archaic. starvation.
[1325–75; Middle English < Middle French, derivative of faim hunger (< Latin famēs)]

famine

, famish - Famine and famish come from Latin fames, "hunger."
See also related terms for hunger.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.famine - an acute insufficiencyfamine - an acute insufficiency    
deficiency, lack, want - the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable; "there is a serious lack of insight into the problem"; "water is the critical deficiency in desert regions"; "for want of a nail the shoe was lost"
2.famine - a severe shortage of food (as through crop failure) resulting in violent hunger and starvation and death
calamity, catastrophe, tragedy, disaster, cataclysm - an event resulting in great loss and misfortune; "the whole city was affected by the irremediable calamity"; "the earthquake was a disaster"
the Great Calamity, the Great Hunger, the Great Starvation, the Irish Famine - a famine in Ireland resulting from a potato blight; between 1846 and 1851 a million people starved to death and 1.6 million emigrated (most to America)

famine

noun hunger, want, starvation, deprivation, scarcity, dearth, destitution refugees trapped by war, drought and famine
Quotations
"They that die by famine die by inches" [Matthew Henry Expositions on the Old and New Testament]
Translations
مَجاعَةنَقْص، مَجاعَه، جوع
hladomor
hungersnødsult
nälänhätä
glad
éhínség
hallæri
飢饉
기근
badas
bads
hladomor
lakota
hungersnöd
ความขาดแคลนอาหาร
nạn đói

famine

[ˈfæmɪn]
A. N (= hunger) → hambruna f; (= shortage) → escasez f
B. CPD famine relief Nayuda f contra el hambre

famine

[ˈfæmɪn]
nfamine f
modif
famine relief → aide f aux victimes de la famine
famine victim → victime f de la famine

famine

n (lit)Hungersnot f; (fig)Knappheit f; to die of famineverhungern

famine

[ˈfæmɪn] ncarestia

famine

(ˈfӕmin) noun
(a) great lack or shortage especially of food. Some parts of the world suffer regularly from famine.

famine

مَجاعَة hladomor hungersnød Hungersnot λιμός hambruna nälänhätä famine glad carestia 飢饉 기근 hongersnood hungersnød głód fome, penúria голод hungersnöd ความขาดแคลนอาหาร kıtlık nạn đói 饥荒

famine

n. hambre, carestía.
References in classic literature ?
To see him striding along the profile of a hill on a windy day, with his clothes bagging and fluttering about him, one might have mistaken him for the genius of famine descending upon the earth, or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield.
He must have been born in some time of general drought and famine, or upon one of those fast days for which his state is famous.
Yet there have been known to be philosophers and plain men who swore by Malthus in the books, and would, nevertheless, subscribe to a relief fund in time of a famine.
Captain Marsh and Famine and Pestilence the baby COYOTES, and Sour-Mash and her pups, and Sardanapalus and her kittens - hang these names she gives the creatures, they warp my jaw - and Potter: you - all sitting around in the house, and Soldier Boy at the window the entire time, it's a wonder to me she comes along as well as she does.
His breath bred pestilence and conflagration, and his appetite bred famine.
Wilson's got a scheme for driving plain window glass panes out of the market by decorating it with greasy finger marks, and getting rich by selling it at famine prices to the crowned heads over in Europe to outfit their palaces with.
Ravenous, and now very faint, I devoured a spoonful or two of my portion without thinking of its taste; but the first edge of hunger blunted, I perceived I had got in hand a nauseous mess; burnt porridge is almost as bad as rotten potatoes; famine itself soon sickens over it.
He ceas'd, for both seemd highly pleasd, and Death Grinnd horrible a gastly smile, to hear His famine should be fill'd, and blest his mawe Destin'd to that good hour: no less rejoyc'd His mother bad, and thus bespake her Sire.
They apprehended my breaking loose; that my diet would be very expensive, and might cause a famine.
He confessed with the utmost frankness and ingenuity that the priests and religious have given dreadful accounts both of us and of the religion we preached; that the unhappy people were taught by them that the curse of God attended us wheresoever we went; that we were always followed by the grasshoppers, that pest of Abyssinia, which carried famine and destruction over all the country; that he, seeing no grasshoppers following us when we passed by their village, began to doubt of the reality of what the priests had so confidently asserted, and was now convinced that the representation they made of us was calumny and imposture.
Under every species of discouragement, they undertook the voyage; they performed it in spite of numerous and almost insuperable obstacles; they arrived upon a wilderness bound with frost and hoary with snow, without the boundaries of their charter, outcasts from all human society, and coasted five weeks together, in the dead of winter, on this tempestuous shore, exposed at once to the fury of the elements, to the arrows of the native savage, and to the impending horrors of famine.
The distress of seeing the sky turn brazen, and withhold its needful moisture from the earth, is not felt by the servant but by the master, who in time of scarcity and famine must support him who has served him in times of plenty and abundance.