famine


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fam·ine

 (făm′ĭn)
n.
1. A drastic, wide-reaching food shortage.
2. A drastic shortage; a dearth.
3. Severe hunger; starvation.
4. Archaic Extreme appetite.

[Middle English, from Old French, from faim, hunger, from Latin famēs.]

famine

(ˈfæmɪn)
n
1. a severe shortage of food, as through crop failure or overpopulation
2. acute shortage of anything
3. violent hunger
[C14: from Old French, via Vulgar Latin, from Latin famēs hunger]

fam•ine

(ˈfæm ɪn)

n.
1. extreme and general scarcity of food, esp. within a large geographical area.
2. any extreme scarcity.
3. Archaic. starvation.
[1325–75; Middle English < Middle French, derivative of faim hunger (< Latin famēs)]

famine

, famish - Famine and famish come from Latin fames, "hunger."
See also related terms for hunger.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.famine - an acute insufficiencyfamine - an acute insufficiency    
deficiency, lack, want - the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable; "there is a serious lack of insight into the problem"; "water is the critical deficiency in desert regions"; "for want of a nail the shoe was lost"
2.famine - a severe shortage of food (as through crop failure) resulting in violent hunger and starvation and death
calamity, catastrophe, tragedy, disaster, cataclysm - an event resulting in great loss and misfortune; "the whole city was affected by the irremediable calamity"; "the earthquake was a disaster"
the Great Calamity, the Great Hunger, the Great Starvation, the Irish Famine - a famine in Ireland resulting from a potato blight; between 1846 and 1851 a million people starved to death and 1.6 million emigrated (most to America)

famine

noun hunger, want, starvation, deprivation, scarcity, dearth, destitution refugees trapped by war, drought and famine
Quotations
"They that die by famine die by inches" [Matthew Henry Expositions on the Old and New Testament]
Translations
مَجاعَةنَقْص، مَجاعَه، جوع
hladomor
hungersnødsult
nälänhätä
glad
éhínség
hallæri
飢饉
기근
badas
bads
hladomor
lakota
hungersnöd
ความขาดแคลนอาหาร
nạn đói

famine

[ˈfæmɪn]
A. N (= hunger) → hambruna f; (= shortage) → escasez f
B. CPD famine relief Nayuda f contra el hambre

famine

[ˈfæmɪn]
nfamine f
modif
famine relief → aide f aux victimes de la famine
famine victim → victime f de la famine

famine

n (lit)Hungersnot f; (fig)Knappheit f; to die of famineverhungern

famine

[ˈfæmɪn] ncarestia

famine

(ˈfӕmin) noun
(a) great lack or shortage especially of food. Some parts of the world suffer regularly from famine.

famine

مَجاعَة hladomor hungersnød Hungersnot λιμός hambruna nälänhätä famine glad carestia 飢饉 기근 hongersnood hungersnød głód fome, penúria голод hungersnöd ความขาดแคลนอาหาร kıtlık nạn đói 饥荒

famine

n. hambre, carestía.
References in classic literature ?
I recollect only one little flat piece near Port Famine, and another of rather larger extent near Goeree Road.
In the Strait of Magellan looking due southward from Port Famine, the distant channels between the mountains appeared from their gloominess to lead beyond the confines of this world.
They had been accustomed to each other's appearance, and to the gradual operation of hunger and hardship upon their frames, but the change in the looks of these men, since last they parted, was a type of the famine and desolation of the land; and they now began to indulge the horrible presentiment that they would all starve together, or be reduced to the direful alternative of casting lots!
Like most creatures of the Wild, he early experienced famine.
Famine was in every working-class quarter in the world within three weeks of the beginning of the war.
In our dear country, as indeed in the whole of Europe, a famine visits humanity about four times a century, as far as I can remember; once in every twenty-five years.
Besides, there's going to be a famine, and every ounce of grub'll count.
When Captain Bonneville saw his messengers return empty-handed, he ordered an instant move, for there was imminent danger of famine.
If I have encountered pain, famine, and disease in accomplishing the settlement of this rough territory, I have not the misery of failure to add to the grievances.
Before, when population pressed against the means of subsistence, the excess population had been swept away by famine.
He must have been born in some time of general drought and famine, or upon one of those fast days for which his state is famous.
The women cried over Cathy, so did even those stern warriors, the Rocky Mountain Rangers; Shekels was there, and the Cid, and Sardanapalus, and Potter, and Mongrel, and Sour-Mash, Famine, and Pestilence, and Cathy kissed them all and wept; details of the several arms of the garrison were present to represent the rest, and say good-bye and God bless you for all the soldiery; and there was a special squad from the Seventh, with the oldest veteran at its head, to speed the Seventh's Child with grand honors and impressive ceremonies; and the veteran had a touching speech by heart, and put up his hand in salute and tried to say it, but his lips trembled and his voice broke, but Cathy bent down from the saddle and kissed him on the mouth and turned his defeat to victory, and a cheer went up.