fanatic

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fa·nat·ic

 (fə-năt′ĭk)
n.
A person marked or motivated by an extreme, unreasoning enthusiasm, as for a cause.
adj.
Fanatical.

[Latin fānāticus, inspired by orgiastic rites, pertaining to a temple, from fānum, temple; see dhēs- in Indo-European roots.]

fanatic

(fəˈnætɪk)
n
1. a person whose enthusiasm or zeal for something is extreme or beyond normal limits
2. informal a person devoted to a particular hobby or pastime; fan: a jazz fanatic.
adj
a variant of fanatical
[C16: from Latin fānāticus belonging to a temple, hence, inspired by a god, frenzied, from fānum temple]

fa•nat•ic

(fəˈnæt ɪk)

n.
1. a person with an extreme and uncritical enthusiasm or zeal, as in religion or politics; zealot.
adj.
2. fanatical.
[1515–25; < Latin fānāticus pertaining to a temple, derivative of fānum temple]
syn: fanatic, zealot, devotee refer to persons showing more than ordinary enthusiasm or support for a cause, belief, or activity. fanatic and zealot both suggest extreme or excessive devotion. fanatic further implies unbalanced or obsessive behavior: a wild-eyed fanatic. zealot, slightly less unfavorable in implication, implies single-minded partisanship: a tireless zealot for tax reform. devotee is a milder term, suggesting enthusiasm but not to the exclusion of other interests or possible points of view: a devotee of baseball.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fanatic - a person motivated by irrational enthusiasm (as for a cause)fanatic - a person motivated by irrational enthusiasm (as for a cause); "A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject"--Winston Churchill
enthusiast, partizan, partisan - an ardent and enthusiastic supporter of some person or activity
Adj.1.fanatic - marked by excessive enthusiasm for and intense devotion to a cause or idea; "rabid isolationist"
passionate - having or expressing strong emotions

fanatic

noun extremist, activist, militant, addict, enthusiast, buff (informal), visionary, devotee, bigot, zealot, energumen I am not a religious fanatic but I am a Christian.
Quotations
"A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject" [Winston Churchill]

fanatic

noun
1. One who holds extreme views or advocates extreme measures:
2. One zealously devoted to a religion:
3. A person who is ardently devoted to a particular subject or activity:
Informal: buff, fan, fiend.
Slang: freak, nut.
adjective
Holding especially political views that deviate drastically and fundamentally from conventional or traditional beliefs:
Slang: far-out.
Translations
مُتَعَصِّبمُتَعَصِّب، مُتَحَمِّس
fanatikfanatic
fanatiker
kiihkoilijakiihkomielinenfanaatikkofanaattinenkiihkeä
fanatik
fanatikus
ofstækismaîur, öfgamaîur
熱狂者
광신자
fanatiškaifanatizmas
fanātiķis
fanatikfanatický
fanatisk
ผู้คลั่งไคล้
người cuồng tín

fanatic

[fəˈnætɪk]
A. ADJfanático
B. Nfanático/a m/f

fanatic

[fəˈnætɪk] n
(= enthusiast) → fanatique mf
a football fanatic → un(e) fanatique de football, un(e) fana de qch
(= extremist) → fanatique mf
a religious fanatic → un fanatique religieux

fanatic

nFanatiker(in) m(f)
adj = fanatical

fanatic

[fəˈnætɪk] nfanatico/a

fanatic

(fəˈnӕtik) noun
a person who is (too) enthusiastic about something. a religious fanatic.
faˈnatic(al) adjective
(too) enthusiastic. He is fanatical about physical exercise.
faˈnatically adverb
faˈnaticism (-sizəm) noun
(too) great enthusiasm, especially about religion. Fanaticism is the cause of most religious hatred.

fanatic

مُتَعَصِّب fanatik fanatiker Fanatiker φανατικός fanático kiihkoilija fanatique fanatik fanatico 熱狂者 광신자 fanaticus fanatiker fanatyk fanático фанатик fanatisk ผู้คลั่งไคล้ fanatik người cuồng tín 狂热者

fanatic

, fanatical
a. fanático-a.
References in classic literature ?
Here there are robbers, here vigilance committees, and here guerilla bands ruling patches of exhausted territory, strange federations and brotherhoods form and dissolve, and religious fanaticisms begotten of despair gleam in famine-bright eyes.
Between the mutually perpetuating fanaticisms of the suicide bombers and the militant Israeli right, Jacir hollows a tentative aesthetic space in which it's possible to sense, without feeling obliged to make excuses for the savagery of either side, the bitterness of exile.
One of the book's shortcomings is Berman's argument that the world of Islam and its fanaticisms are really not so exotic or distinct from the intellectual and ideological history of Europe.