fancied


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fan·cy

 (făn′sē)
adj. fan·ci·er, fan·ci·est
1.
a. Highly decorated: a fancy hat.
b. Complex or intricate: the fancy footwork of a figure skater.
2.
a. Elegantly fashionable or sophisticated: a fancy restaurant; a fancy way of asking for a loan.
b. Of superior grade; fine: fancy preserves.
3. Excessive or exorbitant: paid a fancy price for the car.
4. Bred for unusual qualities or special points.
n. pl. fan·cies
1. The mental faculty through which whims, visions, and fantasies are summoned up; imagination, especially of a whimsical or fantastic nature.
2. Something imagined or invented by the mind: "As the fancies that kept crowding in upon him only made him more excited, he got out of bed and tried to think." (Sherwood Anderson).
3.
a. A capricious liking or inclination: I have a fancy for a glass of wine.
b. A romantic liking or interest: She's taken a fancy to you.
4.
a. The enthusiasts or fans of a sport or pursuit considered as a group.
b. The sport or pursuit, such as boxing, engaging the interest of such a group.
tr.v. fan·cied, fan·cy·ing, fan·cies
1.
a. To have a liking or enthusiasm for: fancies sports cars.
b. To have a desire or inclination for: Would you fancy a cup of coffee?
c. To take a romantic interest in (someone): Do you think he fancies her?
2. To imagine or suppose: "I fancy she is an exceedingly proud woman" (Jane Austen).

[From Middle English fantsy, imagination, fantasy, from fantasie; see fantasy.]

fan′ci·ly adv.
fan′ci·ness n.

fancied

(ˈfænsɪd)
adj
1. imaginary; unreal
2. thought likely to win or succeed: a fancied runner.

fan•cied

(ˈfæn sid)

adj.
unreal; imaginary.
[1560–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fancied - formed or conceived by the imagination; "a fabricated excuse for his absence"; "a fancied wrong"; "a fictional character"
unreal - lacking in reality or substance or genuineness; not corresponding to acknowledged facts or criteria; "ghosts and other unreal entities"; "unreal propaganda serving as news"
Translations

fancied

[ˈfænsɪd] ADJ
1. (= imaginary) → imaginario, ficticio
2. (Sport) [horse, runner] → favorito

fancied

[ˈfænsid] adj
(= expected to do well) (in competition, race) [horse, rider, team] → favori(te)
(= imagined) → imaginaire

fancied

adj (= imaginary)eingebildet

fancied

[ˈfænsɪd] adj
a. (imaginary) → immaginario/a
b. (horse, candidate) → favorito/a
References in classic literature ?
It pursues him through his dreams, gnaws at the heart of all his fancied pleasures, robs the banquet of its taste, music of its sweetness, makes happiness itself unhappy, and yet is no bodily sensation, but a phantom without shape, or form, or visible presence; pervading everything, but having no existence; recognisable everywhere, but nowhere seen, or touched, or met with face to face, until the sleep is past, and waking agony returns.
I climbed the barren mountain, And my gaze swept far and wide For the red-lit eaves of my father's home, And I fancied that he sighed: My son has gone for a soldier, For a soldier night and day; But my son is wise, and may yet return, When the drums have died away.
I climbed the topmost summit, And my gaze swept far and wide For the garden roof where my brother stood, And I fancied that he sighed: My brother serves as a soldier With his comrades night and day; But my brother is wise, and may yet return, Though the dead lie far away.
He only wanted to aggrandise and enrich himself; and if Miss Woodhouse of Hartfield, the heiress of thirty thousand pounds, were not quite so easily obtained as he had fancied, he would soon try for Miss Somebody else with twenty, or with ten.
But he had fancied her in love with him; that evidently must have been his dependence; and after raving a little about the seeming incongruity of gentle manners and a conceited head, Emma was obliged in common honesty to stop and admit that her own behaviour to him had been so complaisant and obliging, so full of courtesy and attention, as (supposing her real motive unperceived) might warrant a man of ordinary observation and delicacy, like Mr.
In short, his wits being quite gone, he hit upon the strangest notion that ever madman in this world hit upon, and that was that he fancied it was right and requisite, as well for the support of his own honour as for the service of his country, that he should make a knight-errant of himself, roaming the world over in full armour and on horseback in quest of adventures, and putting in practice himself all that he had read of as being the usual practices of knights-errant; righting every kind of wrong, and exposing himself to peril and danger from which, in the issue, he was to reap eternal renown and fame.
I could not distinguish countenances from the drawer, but I fancied young Shoreham to be a handsome youth, the governess to be pale and slightly ugly, though very agreeable in manner, and Julia excessively embarrassed, but determined to defend her purchase, should it become necessary.
Beyond the sphere of their body and this earth they now fancied themselves transported, these ungrateful ones.
Bennet, who fancied she had gained a complete victory over him, continued her triumph.
Once or twice Wingrave fancied that his companion hung a little heavily upon his arm.
She had been made to break an accepted social law, but no law know to the environment in which she fancied herself such an anomaly.
She, pleased and happy after her conversation with her daughter, had gone to the prince to say good-night as usual, and though she had no intention of telling him of Levin's offer and Kitty's refusal, still she hinted to her husband that she fancied things were practically settled with Vronsky, and that he would declare himself so soon as his mother arrived.