fantastic


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Related to fantastic: Fantastic fiction

fan·tas·tic

 (făn-tăs′tĭk) also fan·tas·ti·cal (-tĭ-kəl)
adj.
1.
a. Based on or existing only in fantasy; unreal: fantastic mythological creatures; the fantastic realms of science fiction.
b. Strange or fanciful in form, conception, or appearance: "The fire assumed fantastic shapes as he watched" (Ward Just).
2.
a. Unrealistic; irrational: "the early jubilant years of the Restoration with their fantastic hopes of a Golden Age and incorruptible power" (Janet Todd).
b. Exceedingly great in size or degree; extravagant: a fantastic sum of money.
3. Wonderful or superb; remarkable: a fantastic trip to Europe.
n.
An eccentric person.

[Middle English fantastik, imagined, from Old French fantastique, from Late Latin phantasticus, imaginary, from Greek phantastikos, able to create mental images, from phantazesthai, to appear; see fantasy.]

fan·tas′ti·cal′i·ty (-tĭ-kăl′ĭ-tē) n.
fan·tas′ti·cal·ly adv.
Synonyms: fantastic, bizarre, grotesque, fanciful, exotic
These adjectives apply to what is very strange or strikingly unusual. Fantastic describes what seems to have slight relation to the real world because of its strangeness or extravagance: fantastic imaginary beasts such as the unicorn. Bizarre stresses oddness that is heightened by striking contrasts and incongruities and that shocks or fascinates: "a bizarre array of bellbottoms, floral shirts, shoes with brass buckles, white belts, orange hot pants, and miniskirts" (James S. Hirsch).
Grotesque refers principally to deformity and distortion, often of a ludicrous or repulsive nature: statues of grotesque, misshapen creatures. Fanciful applies to what is strongly influenced by imagination, caprice, or whimsy: "folksingers telling old tales in fanciful masks, wigs and costumes" (Anchee Min).
Something exotic is unusual and intriguing: painted landscapes in exotic colors.

fantastic

(fænˈtæstɪk)
adj
1. strange, weird, or fanciful in appearance, conception, etc
2. created in the mind; illusory
3. extravagantly fanciful; unrealistic: fantastic plans.
4. incredible or preposterous; absurd: a fantastic verdict.
5. informal very large or extreme; great: a fantastic fortune; he suffered fantastic pain.
6. informal very good; excellent
7. of, given to, or characterized by fantasy
8. not constant; capricious; fitful: given to fantastic moods.
n
archaic a person who dresses or behaves eccentrically
[C14 fantastik imaginary, via Late Latin from Greek phantastikos capable of imagining, from phantazein to make visible]
ˌfantastiˈcality, fanˈtasticalness n

fan•tas•tic

(fænˈtæs tɪk)

also fan•tas′ti•cal,



adj.
1. conceived or seemingly conceived by an unrestrained imagination; odd and remarkable; bizarre; grotesque.
2. fanciful or capricious, as persons or their ideas or actions.
3. not based on reality; imaginary or groundless; irrational: fantastic fears.
4. extravagantly fanciful.
5. extremely great; lavish: to earn a fantastic salary.
6. extraordinarily good.
[1350–1400; Middle English fantastik pertaining to the imaginative faculty < Medieval Latin fantasticus < Greek phantastikós able to present or show (to the mind)]
fan•tas′ti•cal•ly, adv.
fan•tas′ti•cal•ness, fan•tas`ti•cal′i•ty, n.
syn: fantastic, bizarre, grotesque share a sense of deviation from what is normal or expected. fantastic suggests a wild lack of restraint and a fancifulness so extreme as to lose touch with reality: a fantastic new space vehicle. bizarre implies striking or odd elements that surprise and captivate the observer: bizarre costumes for Mardi Gras. grotesque implies shocking distortion or incongruity, sometimes ludicrous, but more often pitiful or tragic: the grotesque gestures of a mime.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fantastic - ludicrously oddfantastic - ludicrously odd; "Hamlet's assumed antic disposition"; "fantastic Halloween costumes"; "a grotesque reflection in the mirror"
strange, unusual - being definitely out of the ordinary and unexpected; slightly odd or even a bit weird; "a strange exaltation that was indefinable"; "a strange fantastical mind"; "what a strange sense of humor she has"
2.fantastic - extraordinarily good or great ; used especially as intensifiers; "a fantastic trip to the Orient"; "the film was fantastic!"; "a howling success"; "a marvelous collection of rare books"; "had a rattling conversation about politics"; "a tremendous achievement"
extraordinary - beyond what is ordinary or usual; highly unusual or exceptional or remarkable; "extraordinary authority"; "an extraordinary achievement"; "her extraordinary beauty"; "enjoyed extraordinary popularity"; "an extraordinary capacity for work"; "an extraordinary session of the legislature"
3.fantastic - fanciful and unrealistic; foolish; "a fantastic idea of his own importance"
unrealistic - not realistic; "unrealistic expectations"; "prices at unrealistic high levels"
4.fantastic - existing in fancy only; "fantastic figures with bulbous heads the circumference of a bushel"- Nathaniel Hawthorne
unreal - lacking in reality or substance or genuineness; not corresponding to acknowledged facts or criteria; "ghosts and other unreal entities"; "unreal propaganda serving as news"
5.fantastic - extravagantly fanciful in design, construction, appearance; "Gaudi's fantastic architecture"
fancy - not plain; decorative or ornamented; "fancy handwriting"; "fancy clothes"

fantastic

Informal
adjective
1. wonderful, great, excellent, very good, mean (slang), topping (Brit. slang), cracking (Brit. informal), crucial (slang), smashing (informal), superb, tremendous (informal), magnificent, marvellous, terrific (informal), sensational (informal), mega (slang), awesome (slang), dope (slang), world-class, first-rate, def (slang), brill (informal), out of this world (informal), boffo (slang), the dog's bollocks (taboo slang), jim-dandy (slang), bitchin' (U.S. slang), chillin' (U.S. slang) I have a fantastic social life.
wonderful common, poor, normal, ordinary, typical, everyday
2. (Informal) enormous, great, huge, vast, severe, extreme, overwhelming, tremendous, immense, fuck-off (offensive taboo slang) fantastic amounts of money
4. implausible, unlikely, incredible, absurd, irrational, preposterous, capricious, cock-and-bull (informal), cockamamie (slang, chiefly U.S.), mad He had cooked up some fantastic story about how the ring had come into his possession.

fantastic

adjective
Translations
رائِعغَريب، خَياليهَائِل
skvělýfantastickýneskutečnýbáječný
fantastiskpragtfuld
fantastinenmahtava
fantastičan
fantasztikus
frábær, stórkostlegurstórfurîulegur, ótrúlegur
すばらしい
환상적인
fantastischfabelachtig
čudovit
fantastisk
วิเศษ
tuyệt vời

fantastic

[fænˈtæstɪk] ADJ
1. (= fabulous, terrific) [person, achievement, opportunity, news] → fantástico, estupendo, regio (LAm) , macanudo (S. Cone) , chévere (Col, Ven)
it's fantastic to see you again!¡qué alegría verte de nuevo!
you look fantastic! (= healthy) → ¡qué buen aspecto tienes!; (= attractive) → ¡qué guapo estás!
2. (= huge) [amount, profit, speed] → increíble
3. (= exotic) [creature, world] → fantástico; [shapes, images] → extraño
4. (= improbable) [story, idea] → fantástico

fantastic

[fænˈtæstɪk] adj
(= wonderful) → formidable
(= very large) [sum, amount] → fabuleux/euse

fantastic

[fænˈtæstɪk] fantastical [fænˈtæstɪkəl] adj (= unbelievable, unlikely) [story, legend] → invraisemblable

fantastic

interj (inf)fantastisch!, toll! (inf); you’re pregnant? fantastic!du bist schwanger? (das ist ja) toll! (inf)
adj
(inf: = wonderful) → fantastisch, toll (inf); it was a fantastic successes war ein Riesenerfolg; to look fantasticfantastisch or fabelhaft aussehen; to sound fantasticsich fantastisch anhören
(inf: = terrific, huge) range, profitfantastisch; a fantastic amount of, fantastic amounts ofunwahrscheinlich or wahnsinnig viel (inf); at a fantastic speedunwahrscheinlich or wahnsinnig schnell (inf)
(= fantastical, exotic) creaturefantastisch, phantastisch; fantastic worldFabelwelt f ? trip VT c
(= unbelievable, improbable) storyunwahrscheinlich; truthunglaublich; fantastic though that may seemso unglaublich das auch scheinen mag; it all seems a bit too fantastic to mees kommt mir alles etwas zu unglaublich vor

fantastic

[fænˈtæstɪk] adj (gen) → fantastico/a; (idea) → assurdo/a

fantasy

(ˈfӕntəsi) plural ˈfantasies noun
an imaginary (especially not realistic) scene, story etc. He was always having fantasies about becoming rich and famous; (also adjective) He lived in a fantasy world.
fantastic (fӕnˈtӕstik) adjective
1. unbelievable and like a fantasy. She told me some fantastic story about her father being a Grand Duke!
2. wonderful; very good. You look fantastic!
fanˈtastically adverb

fantastic

هَائِل skvělý fantastisk fantastisch φανταστικός fantástico fantastinen fantastique fantastičan fantastico すばらしい 환상적인 fantastisch eventyrlig fantastyczny fantástico фантастический fantastisk วิเศษ harika tuyệt vời 奇异的
References in classic literature ?
All beneath the fantastic limbs and ragged tree tops, which were, here and there, dimly painted against the starry zenith, lay alike in shadowed obscurity.
A will, most unlike her own, constrained her to do its grotesque and fantastic bidding.
After my fellowship of toil and impracticable schemes with the dreamy brethren of Brook Farm; after living for three years within the subtle influence of an intellect like Emerson's; after those wild, free days on the Assabeth, indulging fantastic speculations, beside our fire of fallen boughs, with Ellery Channing; after talking with Thoreau about pine-trees and Indian relics in his hermitage at Walden; after growing fastidious by sympathy with the classic refinement of Hillard's culture; after becoming imbued with poetic sentiment at Longfellow's hearthstone -- it was time, at length, that I should exercise other faculties of my nature, and nourish myself with food for which I had hitherto had little appetite.
Its limbs were gnarled and fantastic, large enough to form trunks for ordinary trees, twisting down almost to the earth, and rising again into the air.
They harassed me so that sometimes, at odd moments, I shut myself up audibly to rehearse--it was at once a fantastic relief and a renewed despair--the manner in which I might come to the point.
In bony, ribby regions of the earth, where at the base of high broken cliffs masses of rock lie strewn in fantastic groupings upon the plain, you will often discover images as of the petrified forms of the Leviathan partly merged in grass, which of a windy day breaks against them in a surf of green surges.
Every year there were scandals and investigations in this institution, the newspapers charging that doctors were allowed to try fantastic experiments upon the patients; but Jurgis knew nothing of this--his only complaint was that they used to feed him upon tinned meat, which no man who had ever worked in Packingtown would feed to his dog.
The black, glassy eyes glittered with a kind of wicked drollery, and the thing struck up, in a clear shrill voice, an odd negro melody, to which she kept time with her hands and feet, spinning round, clapping her hands, knocking her knees together, in a wild, fantastic sort of time, and producing in her throat all those odd guttural sounds which distinguish the native music of her race; and finally, turning a summerset or two, and giving a prolonged closing note, as odd and unearthly as that of a steam-whistle, she came suddenly down on the carpet, and stood with her hands folded, and a most sanctimonious expression of meekness and solemnity over her face, only broken by the cunning glances which she shot askance from the corners of her eyes.
And she -- she was no more startled at his fantastic make-up than if she was used to his like every day of her life.
She had caught sight of her new Sunday gown-- a cheap curtain-calico thing, a conflagration of gaudy colors and fantastic figures.
The field for the exhibition of her creative instinct was painfully small, and the only use she had made of it as yet was to leave eggs out of the corn bread one day and milk another, to see how it would turn out; to part Fanny's hair sometimes in the middle, sometimes on the right, and sometimes on the left side; and to play all sorts of fantastic pranks with the children, occasionally bringing them to the table as fictitious or historical characters found in her favorite books.
That a greater fool than Jane Eyre had never breathed the breath of life; that a more fantastic idiot had never surfeited herself on sweet lies, and swallowed poison as if it were nectar.