fantastication

fan·tas·ti·cate

 (făn-tăs′tĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. fan·tas·ti·cat·ed, fan·tas·ti·cat·ing, fan·tas·ti·cates
To make fantastic: "[his] splendidly baroque style adorns and fantasticates his thought" (New York Times).

fan·tas′ti·ca′tion n.

fantastication

(fænˈtæstɪˌkeɪʃən)
n
the act of making fantastic
References in periodicals archive ?
Very few poets could get away with the word that Nightingale coins in the concluding line but he at least comes very close: "The sand / Bears a legend because you learned to see / By fantastication of heart sunlight's surety.
Very few poets could get away with the word that Nightingale coins in the concluding line, but he at least comes very close: "The sand / Bears a legend, because you learned to see / By fantastication of heart, sunlight's surety.