farce


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Related to farce: farce comedy

farce

 (färs)
n.
1.
a. A light dramatic work in which highly improbable plot situations, exaggerated characters, and often slapstick elements are used for humorous effect.
b. The branch of literature constituting such works.
c. The broad or spirited humor characteristic of such works.
2. A ludicrous, empty show; a mockery: The fixed election was a farce.
3. A seasoned stuffing, as for roasted turkey.
tr.v. farced, farc·ing, farc·es
1. To pad (a speech, for example) with jokes or witticisms.
2. To stuff, as for roasting.

[Middle English farse, stuffing, from Old French farce, stuffing, interpolation, interlude, from Vulgar Latin *farsa, from feminine of Latin farsus, variant of fartus, past participle of farcīre, to stuff.]

farce

(fɑːs)
n
1. (Theatre) a broadly humorous play based on the exploitation of improbable situations
2. (Theatre) the genre of comedy represented by works of this kind
3. a ludicrous situation or action
4. (Cookery) Also: farcemeat another name for forcemeat
vb (tr)
5. to enliven (a speech, etc) with jokes
6. (Cookery) to stuff (meat, fowl, etc) with forcemeat
[C14 (in the sense: stuffing): from Old French, from Latin farcīre to stuff, interpolate passages (in the mass, in religious plays, etc)]

farce

(fɑrs)

n., v. farced, farc•ing. n.
1. a comedy based on unlikely situations and exaggerated effects.
2. humor of the type displayed in such works.
3. a foolish or meaningless show; ridiculous sham; mockery.
4. a stuffing; forcemeat.
v.t.
5. to enliven (a speech or composition), esp. with witty material.
6. to stuff; cram.
[1300–50; Middle English fars stuffing < Middle French farce < Vulgar Latin *farsa, n. use of feminine of Latin. farsus stuffed, past participle of farcīre to stuff]

farce

- First meant forcemeat stuffing and came to be used metaphorically when a humorous play was "stuffed" in between two more serious acts of the main theatrical presentation—or for interludes of impromptu buffoonery in a dramatic presentation.
See also related terms for metaphor.

forcemeat, farce - A highly seasoned mixture containing chopped meat, forcemeat is an alteration of farcemeat, "stuffing," and has a synonym—farce.
See also related terms for stuffing.

farce


Past participle: farced
Gerund: farcing

Imperative
farce
farce
Present
I farce
you farce
he/she/it farces
we farce
you farce
they farce
Preterite
I farced
you farced
he/she/it farced
we farced
you farced
they farced
Present Continuous
I am farcing
you are farcing
he/she/it is farcing
we are farcing
you are farcing
they are farcing
Present Perfect
I have farced
you have farced
he/she/it has farced
we have farced
you have farced
they have farced
Past Continuous
I was farcing
you were farcing
he/she/it was farcing
we were farcing
you were farcing
they were farcing
Past Perfect
I had farced
you had farced
he/she/it had farced
we had farced
you had farced
they had farced
Future
I will farce
you will farce
he/she/it will farce
we will farce
you will farce
they will farce
Future Perfect
I will have farced
you will have farced
he/she/it will have farced
we will have farced
you will have farced
they will have farced
Future Continuous
I will be farcing
you will be farcing
he/she/it will be farcing
we will be farcing
you will be farcing
they will be farcing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been farcing
you have been farcing
he/she/it has been farcing
we have been farcing
you have been farcing
they have been farcing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been farcing
you will have been farcing
he/she/it will have been farcing
we will have been farcing
you will have been farcing
they will have been farcing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been farcing
you had been farcing
he/she/it had been farcing
we had been farcing
you had been farcing
they had been farcing
Conditional
I would farce
you would farce
he/she/it would farce
we would farce
you would farce
they would farce
Past Conditional
I would have farced
you would have farced
he/she/it would have farced
we would have farced
you would have farced
they would have farced

farce

A humorous play whose structure consists of character stereotypes, mishaps, coinincidences, innuendo and embarrassing disclosures.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Switch to new thesaurus
Noun1.farce - a comedy characterized by broad satire and improbable situationsfarce - a comedy characterized by broad satire and improbable situations
comedy - light and humorous drama with a happy ending
2.farce - mixture of ground raw chicken and mushrooms with pistachios and truffles and onions and parsley and lots of butter and bound with eggs
stuffing, dressing - a mixture of seasoned ingredients used to stuff meats and vegetables
Verb1.farce - fill with a stuffing while cooking; "Have you stuffed the turkey yet?"
cookery, cooking, preparation - the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"
stuff - fill tightly with a material; "stuff a pillow with feathers"
fill, fill up, make full - make full, also in a metaphorical sense; "fill a container"; "fill the child with pride"

farce

noun
1. comedy, satire, slapstick, burlesque, buffoonery, broad comedy The plot often borders on farce.
2. mockery, joke, nonsense, parody, shambles, sham, absurdity, travesty, ridiculousness The election was a farce, as only 22% of voters cast their ballots.

farce

noun
A false, derisive, or impudent imitation of something:
Translations

farce

[fɑːs] N
1. (Theat) → farsa f
2. (fig) → absurdo m
this is a farceesto es absurdo
what a farce this is!¡qué follón!
the trial was a farceel proceso fue una farsa

farce

[ˈfɑːrs] n
(= ridiculous situation) to be a farce → tourner à la farce
(THEATRE) (= play) → farce f

farce

n (Theat, fig) → Farce f; the election campaign degenerated into farceder Wahlkampf wurde zur Farce

farce

[fɑːs] n (Theatre) (fig) → farsa

farce

(faːs) noun
1. a (kind of) comic play in which both the characters and the events shown are improbable and ridiculous. The play is a classic farce.
2. any funny or stupid situation in real life. The meeting was an absolute farce.
farcical (ˈfaːsikəl) adjective
completely ridiculous, and therefore usually humorous. The whole idea was farcical.
References in classic literature ?
It would be well if all our lives were a divine tragedy even, instead of this trivial comedy or farce.
Well, there are times when one would like to hang the whole human race and finish the farce.
The world in general looks upon the college duels as very farcical affairs: true, but considering that the college duel is fought by boys; that the swords are real swords; and that the head and face are exposed, it seems to me that it is a farce which had quite a grave side to it.
I had a sufficiently hard time with that tale, because it changed itself from a farce to a tragedy while I was going along with it--a most embarrassing circumstance.
For Agatha, prompt to ridicule sentimentality in her companions, and gifted with an infectious spirit of farce, secretly turned for imaginative luxury to visions of despair and death; and often endured the mortification of the successful clown who believes, whilst the public roar with laughter at him, that he was born a tragedian.
If they were allowed their own way, every comedy would have a tragic ending, and every tragedy would culminate in a farce.
And, indeed, it's a mere farce my being here for poor Maria,' she continued; 'but your father takes her ailments to heart, and I cannot always be refusing him.
It wouldn't take me much trouble to persuade Chad Cranage and half a dozen other bull-headed fellows that they would be doing an acceptable service to the Church by hunting Will Maskery out of the village with rope-ends and pitchforks; and then, when I had furnished them with half a sovereign to get gloriously drunk after their exertions, I should have put the climax to as pretty a farce as any of my brother clergy have set going in their parishes for the last thirty years.
As to mind, deplorably ignorant and ill-informed: incapable of writing or speaking correctly even German, her native tongue, a dunce in French, and her attempts at learning English a mere farce, yet she has been at school twelve years; but as she invariably gets her exercises, of every description, done by a fellow pupil, and reads her lessons off a book; concealed in her lap, it is not wonderful that her progress has been so snail-like.
A general pause ensued, and I began to hope that the farce was at an end.
I really believe," said he, "I could be fool enough at this moment to undertake any character that ever was written, from Shylock or Richard III down to the singing hero of a farce in his scarlet coat and cocked hat.
Babcock's tender conscience seemed to him a capital farce, and his traveling back to Milan only to get into a deeper muddle appeared, as the reward of his pedantry, exquisitely and ludicrously just.