farmed


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Related to farmed: farmed salmon, Farmed fish, farmed out

farm

 (färm)
n.
1. A tract of land cultivated for the purpose of agricultural production.
2.
a. A tract of land devoted to the raising and breeding of domestic animals.
b. An area of water devoted to the raising, breeding, or production of a specific aquatic animal: a trout farm; an oyster farm.
3.
a. A facility for the generation of energy by converting it from a particular source, usually by means of multiple electric generators: a wind farm.
b. A place where a group of similar devices or storage containers are set up: a tank farm; a server farm.
4. Baseball A minor-league club affiliated with a major-league club for the training of recruits and the maintenance of temporarily unneeded players.
5. Obsolete
a. The system of leasing out the rights of collecting and retaining taxes in a certain district.
b. A district so leased.
v. farmed, farm·ing, farms
v.tr.
1. To cultivate or produce a crop on (land).
2. To cultivate, breed, or raise (plants or animals).
3. To pay a fixed sum in order to have the right to collect and retain profits from (a business, for example).
4. To turn over (a business, for example) to another in return for the payment of a fixed sum.
v.intr.
To engage in farming.
Phrasal Verb:
farm out
1. To send (work, for example) from a central point to be done elsewhere.
2. Baseball To assign (a player) to a minor-league team.

[Middle English, lease, leased property, from Old French ferme, from Medieval Latin firma, fixed payment, from Latin firmāre, to establish, from firmus, firm; see dher- in Indo-European roots.]

farmed

(fɑːmd)
adj
(Agriculture) (of fish and game) reared on a farm rather than caught in the wild
Translations

farmed

[ˈfɑːrmd] adj [venison, turkey] → d'élevage; [fish, salmon] → d'élevage
see also farm, intensively, organically
References in periodicals archive ?
We reported recently that several organic contaminants occurred at elevated concentrations in farmed Atlantic salmon compared with concentrations of the same contaminants in wild Pacific salmon [Hites et al.
A virus now threatening the Mexican farmed sardine stocks has started to spread across the oceans, infecting wild species.
No question, it's been rough seas for farmed salmon lately.
They're helping dismantle our very effective system of family farmed agriculture in favor of a failed Soviet model that replaces state control with corporate-level control.
A land of fertile and loamy river valleys and craggy inhospitable highlands, the people who settled and farmed here were no less shaped by the land than they shaped the land to meet their agricultural needs.
Wilmer Atkinson, a journalist, farmer and Quaker, created the journal as a way to communicate to others who farmed within a day's journey from Philadelphia.
In the first place, it was common: in 1820, 53% of the landholders in Cramahe were tenants; by the 1842 census, 38% of the occupiers of land who farmed were tenants; and by the 1871 census that percentage had declined to 29%.
Earlier studies had already shown that the organically farmed soil had higher levels of organic matter and a larger mass of microorganisms and soil enzymes.
In an analysis of salmon toxicants published 9 January 2004 in Science; a team led by environmental affairs professor Ronald Hites of Indiana University showed that farmed salmon contain significantly higher concentrations of 14 organochlorine contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins than their counterparts caught in the wild.
Although McMurry emphasizes the advantages of the Great Transformation, most notably the reduced labor for women, she too recognizes that under the old system "(t)hey farmed with greater consideration for the land and its productivity and tried to accommodate to natural processes, rather than to overcome them.