farther


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

far·ther

 (fär′thər)
adv.A comparative of far
1. To or at a more distant or remote point: ran farther than the others.
2. To or at a more advanced point or stage: I went no farther that day.
3. Usage Problem To a greater extent or degree: carried the idea farther.
adj.A comparative of far
More distant; remoter: the farther shore.

[Middle English, variant (influenced by far, far) of further; see further.]
Usage Note: Many writers since the Middle English period have used farther and further interchangeably. A relatively recent rule, however, states that farther should be reserved for physical distance and further for nonphysical, metaphorical advancement. The Usage Panel has favored this rule for some time. In our 1987 survey, 74 percent of the Usage Panel preferred farther in the sentence If you are planning to drive any farther than Ukiah, you'd better carry chains, while 64 percent preferred further in the sentence We won't be able to answer these questions until we are further along in our research. While the use of both adverbs was acceptable in these examples in our 2009 survey, only 62 percent accepted the use of further in the drive sentence quoted above, and only 58 percent accepted farther in the research example. Approval of usage following the rule was nearly unanimous.

farther

(ˈfɑːðə)
adv
1. to or at a greater distance in space or time
2. in addition
adj
3. more distant or remote in space or time
4. additional
[C13: see far, further]
Usage: Farther, farthest, further, and furthest can all be used to refer to literal distance, but further and furthest are regarded as more correct for figurative senses denoting greater or additional amount, time, etc: further to my letter. Further and furthest are also preferred for figurative distance

far•ther

(ˈfɑr ðər)

adv. compar. of far with farthest as superl.
1. at or to a greater distance: to run farther down the road.
2. at or to a more advanced point: to go no farther in one's graduate studies.
3. at or to a greater degree or extent: The application of the law was extended farther.
adj. compar. offarwithfarthestas superl.
4. more distant or remote than something or some place nearer: the farther side of the mountain.
5. extending or tending to a greater distance: He made a still farther trip.
[1300–50; Middle English ferther; orig. variant of further]
usage: As an adjective meaning “additional,” only further is used: He gave no further trouble.As an adjective designating distance, either literal or metaphoric, both farther and further are used in all varieties of speech and writing: the farther (or further) island; a farther (or further) stretch of the imagination. further is more usual as an adverb indicating degree: Campaign rhetoric further strained relations between the two parties,and further alone functions as a sentence modifier: Further, this translation is closer to the original Greek.As adverbs, both farther and further are used for distance of any kind - spatial, temporal, or metaphorical: Seattle is farther (or further) from Chicago than Cincinnati is. Look no farther (or further): here is the solution. His study of the epic extends farther (or further) than any recent one.

farther

further

Farther and further are both comparative forms of far. Farthest and furthest are the superlative forms. When you are talking about distance, you can use any of these forms.

Birds were able to find food by flying farther and farther.
He must have found a window open further along the balcony.
Gus was in the farthest corner of the room.
The sun is then at its furthest point to the south.

However, when you are talking about the degree or extent of something, you can only use further or furthest.

He needed to develop his reading further.
The furthest you can get on a farm is foreman, and you won't be this until it's nearly time to retire.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.farther - more distant in especially space or time; "they live in the farther house"
far - located at a great distance in time or space or degree; "we come from a far country"; "far corners of the earth"; "the far future"; "a far journey"; "the far side of the road"; "far from the truth"; "far in the future"
2.farther - more distant in especially degree; "nothing could be further from the truth"; "further from our expectations"; "farther from the truth"; "farther from our expectations"
far - located at a great distance in time or space or degree; "we come from a far country"; "far corners of the earth"; "the far future"; "a far journey"; "the far side of the road"; "far from the truth"; "far in the future"
Adv.1.farther - to or at a greater extent or degree or a more advanced stage (`further' is used more often than `farther' in this abstract sense); "further complicated by uncertainty about the future"; "let's not discuss it further"; "nothing could be further from the truth"; "they are further along in their research than we expected"; "the application of the law was extended farther"; "he is going no farther in his studies"
2.farther - to or at a greater distance in time or space (`farther' is used more frequently than `further' in this physical sense); "farther north"; "moved farther away"; "farther down the corridor"; "the practice may go back still farther to the Druids"; "went only three miles further"; "further in the future"

farther

Usage: Farther, farthest, further, and furthest can all be used to refer to literal distance, but further and furthest are used for figurative senses denoting greater or additional amount, time, etc.: further to my letter. Further and furthest are also preferred for figurative distance.
Translations
dálevzdálenější
dalje

farther

[ˈfɑːðəʳ]
A. ADV = further
B. ADJ COMPAR of far she was sitting at the farther end of the barestaba sentada al otro extremo de la barra
on the farther side of the lakeal otro lado del lago, en la otra orilla del lago

farther

[ˈfɑːrðər] of far
adv
(in distance) [move, go, throw] → plus loin
(in time)plus loin
I can't see any farther than the next six months
BUT Je ne peux rien prévoir au-delà des six prochains mois.
(in being accommodating, making concessions)
He went farther than anyone expected → Il est allé plus loin qu'on ne s'y attendait
adj [side, end] → autre

farther

comp of far
adv = further ADV a
adjweiter entfernt, hintere(r, s); at the farther endam anderen Ende

farther

[ˈfɑːðəʳ] comp of far
1. adv
see further 1a
2. adjpiù lontano/a
on the farther side of the street → dall'altra parte della strada

far

(faː) adverb
1. indicating distance, progress etc. How far is it from here to his house?
2. at or to a long way away. She went far away/off.
3. very much. She was a far better swimmer than her friend (was).
adjective
1. distant; a long way away. a far country.
2. more distant (usually of two things). He lives on the far side of the lake.
farther, farthestfurtherˈfaraway adjective
1. distant. faraway places.
2. not paying attention; dreamy. She had a faraway look in her eyes.
ˌfar-ˈfetched adjective
very unlikely. a far-fetched story.
as far as
1. to the place or point mentioned. We walked as far as the lake.
2. (also so far as) as great a distance as. He did not walk as far as his friends.
3. (also so far as) to the extent that. As far as I know she is well.
by far
by a large amount. They have by far the largest family in the village.
far and away
by a very great amount. She is far and away the cleverest girl in the class!
far from
1. not only not, but. Far from liking him, I hate him.
2. not at all. He was far from helpful.
so far
1. until now. So far we have been quite successful.
2. up to a certain point. We can get so far but no further without more help.

further

(ˈfəːðə) adverb
(sometimes ˈfarther (ˈfaː-) ) at or to a great distance or degree. I cannot go any further.
adverb, adjective
more; in addition. I cannot explain further; There is no further news.
verb
to help (something) to proceed or go forward quickly. He furthered our plans.
ˌfurtherˈmore (-ˈmoː) adverb
in addition (to what has been said). Furthermore, I should like to point out.
ˈfurthest adverb
(also ˈfarthest (ˈfaː-) ) at or to the greatest distance or degree. Who lives furthest away?
References in classic literature ?
Amy got no farther, for Jo's hot temper mastered her, and she shook Amy till her teeth chattered in her head, crying in a passion of grief and anger.
It is a queer land with many traces of an ancient civilization, a civilization which I believe dates back farther than some in the far East.
The light air about me told me that the world ended here: only the ground and sun and sky were left, and if one went a little farther there would be only sun and sky, and one would float off into them, like the tawny hawks which sailed over our heads making slow shadows on the grass.
Farther down, before one of the cottages, a lady in black was walking demurely up and down, telling her beads.
Not by birth, though adopted in that tribe; I think his birthplace was farther north, and he is one of those you call a Huron.
We were busily employed in building this fort, until the fourteenth day of June following, without any farther opposition from the Indians; and having finished the works, I returned to my family, on Clench.
For our own part, we allow them just as little credence as to that other fable of the skeleton hand which the lieutenant- governor was said to have seen at the Colonel's throat, but which vanished away, as he advanced farther into the room.