fascia

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fas·cia

 (făsh′ə, fä′shə)
n. pl. fas·ci·ae (făsh′ē-ē′, fä′shē-ē′)
1. Anatomy
a. A sheet or band of fibrous connective tissue enveloping, separating, or binding together muscles, organs, and other soft structures of the body.
b. The tissue of which such a sheet or band is composed.
2. Biology A broad and distinct band of color.
3. Architecture
a. A flat horizontal band or member between moldings, especially in a classical entablature.
b. (fā′shə)pl. fas·cias A board covering the ends of rafters on the eaves of a building. Also called fascia board.
4. (fā′shə)pl. fas·cias
a. The shape or styling of the front or rear end of an automobile.
b. Chiefly British The dashboard of a motor vehicle.

[Latin, band.]

fas′ci·al adj.

fascia

(ˈfeɪʃɪə) or

facia

n, pl -ciae (-ʃɪˌiː)
1. (Architecture) the flat surface above a shop window
2. (Architecture) architect a flat band or surface, esp a part of an architrave or cornice
3. (Zoology) fibrous connective tissue occurring in sheets beneath the surface of the skin and between muscles and groups of muscles
4. (Biology) biology a distinctive band of colour, as on an insect or plant
5. (Automotive Engineering) Brit a less common name for dashboard1
6. (Telecommunications) a casing that fits over a mobile phone, with spaces for the buttons
[C16: from Latin: band: related to fascis bundle; see fasces]
ˈfascial, ˈfacial adj

fas•ci•a

(ˈfæʃ i ə for 1, 3–5; ˈfeɪ ʃə for 2 )

n., pl. fas•ci•ae (ˈfæʃ iˌi)
for 1, 3–5; fas•cias (fā′shəz) for 2.
1. Also called fas′cia board`. facia.
2.
a. one of a series of horizontal bands, each projecting beyond the one below to form the architrave in the Ionic and Corinthian orders.
b. any relatively broad, flat horizontal surface on a building, as the outer edge of a cornice.
3.
a. a band or sheath of connective tissue covering, supporting, or connecting the muscles or internal organs of the body.
b. tissue of this kind.
4. Zool., Bot. a distinctly marked band of color.
[1555–65; < Latin: band, bandage; akin to fasces]
fas′ci•al, adj.

fascia

A fibrous layer of connective tissue. Such layers join skin to the tissues beneath and form sheaths around individual muscles.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fascia - a sheet or band of fibrous connective tissue separating or binding together muscles and organs etcfascia - a sheet or band of fibrous connective tissue separating or binding together muscles and organs etc
connective tissue - tissue of mesodermal origin consisting of e.g. collagen fibroblasts and fatty cells; supports organs and fills spaces between them and forms tendons and ligaments
aponeurosis - any of the deeper and thicker fascia that attach muscles to bones; resemble flattened tendons
2.fascia - instrument panel on an automobile or airplane containing dials and controls
control board, control panel, instrument panel, board, panel - electrical device consisting of a flat insulated surface that contains switches and dials and meters for controlling other electrical devices; "he checked the instrument panel"; "suddenly the board lit up like a Christmas tree"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Translations

fascia

[ˈfeɪʃə] (Brit) N
1. (on building) → faja f
2. (for mobile phone) → carcasa f
3. (Brit) (Aut) → tablero m

fascia

[ˈfeɪʃə ˈfeɪʃiə] n
(on car dashboard)tableau m de bord
(for mobile phone)façade f

fascia

n (Brit Aut) → Armaturentafel f

fascia

facia [ˈfeɪʃɪə] n (Aut) → cruscotto

fas·ci·a

n. fascia, tejido fibroso conectivo que envuelve el cuerpo bajo la piel y protege los músculos, los nervios y los vasos sanguíneos;
___, aponeurotic___ aponeurótica, tejido fibroso que sirve de soporte a los músculos;
___, Buck's___ de Buck, tejido fibroso que cubre el pene;
___, Colles'___ de Colles, cubierta interna de la fascia perineal;
___ graftinjerto de una ___;
___, lata___ lata, protectora de los músculos del muslo;
___, tranversalis___ tranversal, localizada entre el peritoneo y el músculo transverso del abdomen.

fascia

n (pl -ciae) fascia
References in periodicals archive ?
FASCIAS and soffits are one of the most important external features of your home, giving protection to your roof and property.
The impact of Bibby's investment in Costcutter was underlined as the retailer unveiled three new fascias and a new "consumer-riendly" website at the anniversary event.
1 per cent in Sports Fascias excluding the then newly acquired Allsports stores for the 13 weeks ended April 29 and saw like for like sales in Fashion Fascias adrift 5.
Front and rear fascias of the 2006 Ford Fusion sedan are injection molded of Sequel 1440 thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO).
Because this is the most competitive automotive segment in the United States, Ford engineers designed an innovative attachment scheme for the bumper fascias that would simplify assembly and help to minimize the total system cost of the fascias.
Providing the right combination of material properties and aesthetic attributes, the Bayflex 180 system is used to mold the modified car's front and rear fascias, left and right rocker panels, rear bumper cover, and spoiler.
In addition to automotive bumpers and fascias, the technology has potential for use in food and medical packaging.
The patented embossed designs solve the problems associated with flat fascias while offering old-fashioned charm.
Most symbol groups now I had second fascias, I Landmark Wholesale MD Martin Williams said.
Sequel 1440 HF thermoplastic polyolefin is said to offer a melt flow rate more than 25% higher than the Sequel 1440 grade, making it ideal for use in bumper fascias of the redesigned Ford Mustang.
Decoma designs, engineers and manufactures automotive exterior components and systems which include fascias (bumpers), front and rear end modules, liftgates and running boards, plastic body panels, roof modules, exterior trim components, sealing and greenhouse systems and lighting components for cars and light trucks (including sport utility vehicles and mini-vans).
Today, IMD technology has progressed to much larger 3D parts such as entire instrument panels, bumpers, fascias, roofs, and even hoods for cars and trucks.