fascicle


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fas·ci·cle

 (făs′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. A small bundle.
2. One of the parts of a book published in separate sections. Also called fascicule.
3. Botany A bundle or cluster of stems, flowers, or leaves.

[Latin fasciculus, diminutive of fascis, bundle.]

fas′ci·cled adj.

fascicle

(ˈfæsɪkəl)
n
1. (Botany) a bundle or cluster of branches, leaves, etc
2. (Anatomy) anatomy Also called: fasciculus a small bundle of fibres, esp nerve fibres
3. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing another name for fascicule
4. any small bundle or cluster
[C15: from Latin fasciculus a small bundle, from fascis a bundle]
ˈfascicled adj
fascicular, fasciculate adj
fasˈciculately adv
fasˌcicuˈlation n

fas•ci•cle

(ˈfæs ɪ kəl)

n.
1. a section of a book or set of books being published in installments as separate pamphlets or volumes.
2. a close cluster, as of flowers.
3. a small bundle of nerve or muscle fibers.
[1490–1500; < Latin fasciculus, diminutive of fascis. See fasces, -cle1]

fascicle

an installment of a book or journal that is published in parts.
See also: Books

Fascicle

 small bundle or bunch; a tuft or cluster of leaves, etc.
Examples: fascicle of fibres, 1738; of flowers; of hair, 1792; of leaves [pages of a book]; of roots; of virtues, 1622.

fascicle

(or fasciculus) A bundle of muscle or nerve fibers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fascicle - an installment of a printed work
instalment, installment - a part of a published serial
2.fascicle - a bundle of fibers (especially nerve fibers)fascicle - a bundle of fibers (especially nerve fibers)
trigonum cerebrale, fornix - an arched bundle of white fibers at the base of the brain by which the hippocampus of each hemisphere projects to the contralateral hippocampus and to the thalamus and mamillary bodies
nerve tissue, nervous tissue - tissue composed of neurons
nervous system, systema nervosum - the sensory and control apparatus consisting of a network of nerve cells
nerve, nervus - any bundle of nerve fibers running to various organs and tissues of the body
Translations

fascicle

[ˈfæsɪkl] N fascicule [ˈfæsɪkjuːl] Nfascículo m

fascicle

, fascicule
n
(Bot) → Büschel nt; (Anat) → Bündel nt
(of book)Lieferung f, → Faszikel (old) m

fas·ci·cle

n. fascículo, haz de fibras musculares y nerviosas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many years later, one of the authors received a telephone call from one of the editors revising the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) Fascicle 27 on the tumors of the gallbladder, extrahepatic bile ducts, and ampulla of Vater.
The outcome is an enthusiastic seven-chapter study of the interpretive possibilities that arise from reading the poems in their fascicle contexts.
Unclear differentiation into muscular fascicles and inter-fascicle spaces (US, CR) was also noted but was more greatly expressed in the patients having a shortened tibia accompanied by fibular aplasia.
Under the general oversight of Professor Martin Tetz of Bochum and the north Rhine Westfalian Academy based at Dusseldorf, the first fascicle of the so-called dogmatic works contains the complete edition of the momentous letter to the bishops of Egypt and Libya (the latter being significantly assumed to be under Alexandrian jurisdiction, a matter of dispute in 325).
Those not included in the Middle English Dictionary are usefully marked as such and all terms are carefully defined in the glossary to each fascicle, turning them into a reference guide to Middle English medical and technical vocabulary.
Crumbley, Heginbotham and their contributors present 15 essays: DickinsonAEs Fascicles; the word made flesh: DickinsonAEs variants and the life of language; magical transformations: oNecromancy Sweet,o texts, and identity in Fascicle 8; The Precincts of Play: Fascicle 22; oLooking at Death, is Dyingo: Fascicle 16 in a Civil War context; Civil War(s) and Dickinson manuscript book reconstructions, deconstructed; managing multiple contexts: Dickinson, genre, and the circulation of Fascicle 1; manuscript study, fascicle study: appreciating DickinsonAEs prosody; oThisuwas my finallest/Occasionuo: Fascicle 40 and DickinsonAEs aesthetic of intrinsic renown; coda from My Emily Dickinson.
Among the factors that could affect the ability of muscle power generation, muscle architectural characteristic such as fascicle length is an important indicator (Blazevich, 2006).
A Greek and Arabic Lexicon (GALex): Materials for a Dictionary of the Medieval Translations From Greek Into Arabic; Volume II, Fascicle 14
In fact, the strength of his readings, as with a later chapter on Dickinson that rethinks the final poem in Fascicle 24 as an analogy for dead bodies on a Civil War burial ground (160), is his consideration of poems, essays, and other fictional and nonfictional works as distinctly commenting upon the political, historical and social realm, ranging from such diverse events as the eruption of Mount Vesuvius (Dickinson) to the French "Sunday Revolution" of 1848 (Melville).
Neuromuscular plasticity studies (6,24) have suggested an increase in muscle fiber length of muscles subjected chronically to eccentric work, while a reduction (6) or maintenance (24) of fascicle length has been observed in muscles working concentrically.
Furthermore, three fascicles were selected from two regionsbased on their position relative to the scar: one fascicle from the region superficially to the scar, the second fascicle from the region "underneath" the scar closer to the deep aponeurosis and, a third fascicle (referred to as "typical" fascicle) from the deeper region located as far as possible from the scar.
As the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus was dislocated anteriorly, the popliteus tendon might be pulled anteriorly onto the articular surface of the LTP by the fibrous band, which was considered to be the posteroinferior (or third) popliteomeniscal fascicle [15,16].