fascicle


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fas·ci·cle

 (făs′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. A small bundle.
2. One of the parts of a book published in separate sections. Also called fascicule.
3. Botany A bundle or cluster of stems, flowers, or leaves.

[Latin fasciculus, diminutive of fascis, bundle.]

fas′ci·cled adj.

fascicle

(ˈfæsɪkəl)
n
1. (Botany) a bundle or cluster of branches, leaves, etc
2. (Anatomy) anatomy Also called: fasciculus a small bundle of fibres, esp nerve fibres
3. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing another name for fascicule
4. any small bundle or cluster
[C15: from Latin fasciculus a small bundle, from fascis a bundle]
ˈfascicled adj
fascicular, fasciculate adj
fasˈciculately adv
fasˌcicuˈlation n

fas•ci•cle

(ˈfæs ɪ kəl)

n.
1. a section of a book or set of books being published in installments as separate pamphlets or volumes.
2. a close cluster, as of flowers.
3. a small bundle of nerve or muscle fibers.
[1490–1500; < Latin fasciculus, diminutive of fascis. See fasces, -cle1]

fascicle

an installment of a book or journal that is published in parts.
See also: Books

Fascicle

 small bundle or bunch; a tuft or cluster of leaves, etc.
Examples: fascicle of fibres, 1738; of flowers; of hair, 1792; of leaves [pages of a book]; of roots; of virtues, 1622.

fascicle

(or fasciculus) A bundle of muscle or nerve fibers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fascicle - an installment of a printed work
instalment, installment - a part of a published serial
2.fascicle - a bundle of fibers (especially nerve fibers)fascicle - a bundle of fibers (especially nerve fibers)
trigonum cerebrale, fornix - an arched bundle of white fibers at the base of the brain by which the hippocampus of each hemisphere projects to the contralateral hippocampus and to the thalamus and mamillary bodies
nerve tissue, nervous tissue - tissue composed of neurons
nervous system, systema nervosum - the sensory and control apparatus consisting of a network of nerve cells
nerve, nervus - any bundle of nerve fibers running to various organs and tissues of the body
Translations

fascicle

[ˈfæsɪkl] N fascicule [ˈfæsɪkjuːl] Nfascículo m

fascicle

, fascicule
n
(Bot) → Büschel nt; (Anat) → Bündel nt
(of book)Lieferung f, → Faszikel (old) m

fas·ci·cle

n. fascículo, haz de fibras musculares y nerviosas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also in this fascicle, Gary Macy's detailed study of the meaning of ordinare and ordinationes in the medieval Church illustrate important continuities and discontinuities in the pastoral choices taken by the Church of the West.
Many years later, one of the authors received a telephone call from one of the editors revising the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) Fascicle 27 on the tumors of the gallbladder, extrahepatic bile ducts, and ampulla of Vater.
2007) Electric and electromagnetic Properties of Fiber Fabric Based Filled Epoxy Composites, The Annals of "Dunarea de Jos" University of Galati, Fascicle IX, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Science, XXV (XXX), May 2007, no.
Monophonic Tropes and Conductus of W1: The Tenth Fascicle.
We traced nerve fascicles from branches of human femoral nerves to create fascicle maps.
Those who "recalled" more lures were assumed to be more prone to false memories, and were found to have higher-quality neural connections, called axons, in the superior longitudinal fascicle, known to be associated with gist-based memory.
He described the transfer of a single redundant fascicle from the ulnar nerve directly coapted to the biceps motor fascicle.
It provides the full text in English of variously existing latest in effective Chinese laws, administrative regulations and rules, and departmental regulations and rules for application and approval of establishment registration for foreign investment enterprise, which is associated with the first fascicle of the Guidebook Series for Investing in China Invest in China: A Guidebook for Application and Approval of Establishment Registration for Foreign Investment Enterprises.
Dictionary of Old English: Fascicle A (Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1994).
Emily Dickinson's Fascicle 24: Exploring Poetry Through Manuscript Study.
The Portuguese religious said that she had read "carefully and meditated on the fascicle published by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and confirms everything that is written," the Vatican statement noted.
Another SIMA project is the ongoing publication of the Corpus of Cypriot antiquities, and the 19th fascicle describes Bronze and Iron Age material in New Zealand collections at the Auckland Institute and Museum, the Whanganui Museum, the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in Wellington, the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch and the Otago Museum in Dunedin.