fastidious


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fas·tid·i·ous

 (fă-stĭd′ē-əs, fə-)
adj.
1. Showing or acting with careful attention to detail: a fastidious scholar; fastidious research.
2. Difficult to please; exacting: "The club is also becoming far more fastidious about what constitutes a breed standard" (Janet Burroway).
3. Excessively scrupulous or sensitive, as in taste, propriety, or neatness: "He was a fastidious man who hated to dirty his hands, in particular with food" (Michael Chabon). See Synonyms at meticulous.
4. Microbiology Having complex nutritional requirements.

[Middle English, squeamish, particular, haughty, from Old French fastidieux, from Latin fastīdiōsus, from fastīdium, squeamishness, haughtiness, probably from fastus, disdain.]

fas·tid′i·ous·ly adv.
fas·tid′i·ous·ness n.

fastidious

(fæˈstɪdɪəs)
adj
1. very critical; hard to please
2. excessively particular about details
3. exceedingly delicate; easily disgusted
[C15: from Latin fastīdiōsus scornful, from fastīdium loathing, from fastus pride + taedium weariness]
fasˈtidiously adv
fasˈtidiousness n

fas•tid•i•ous

(fæˈstɪd i əs, fə-)

adj.
1. particular; hard to please.
2. painstaking.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin fastīdiōsus squeamish, derivative of fastidium lack of appetite, disgust]
fas•tid′i•ous•ly, adv.
fas•tid′i•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fastidious - giving careful attention to detail; hard to please; excessively concerned with cleanliness; "a fastidious and incisive intellect"; "fastidious about personal cleanliness"
refined - (used of persons and their behavior) cultivated and genteel; "she was delicate and refined and unused to hardship"; "refined people with refined taste"
tidy - marked by order and cleanliness in appearance or habits; "a tidy person"; "a tidy house"; "a tidy mind"
unfastidious - marked by an absence of due or proper care or attention to detail; not concerned with cleanliness; "unfastidious in her dress"
2.fastidious - having complicated nutritional requirements; especially growing only in special artificial cultures; "fastidious microorganisms"; "certain highly specialized xerophytes are extremely exacting in their requirements"
microbiology - the branch of biology that studies microorganisms and their effects on humans
unfastidious - not exacting in nutritional requirements

fastidious

fastidious

adjective
1. Showing or marked by attentiveness to all aspects or details:
2. Very difficult to please:
Informal: picky.
Translations
náročnývybíravý
sirlig
fastidiöswählerisch
aîfinnslusamur; vandfÿsinn; matvandur
išrankiaiišrankumasišrankus
izlepisizsmalcinātsizvēlīgs

fastidious

[fæsˈtɪdɪəs] ADJ [person] (about cleanliness etc) → escrupuloso; (= touchy) → quisquilloso; [taste] → fino

fastidious

[fæˈstɪdiəs] adj
[person] (= meticulous) → méticuleux/euse, minutieux/euse
to be fastidious about sth [+ hygiene, one's appearance] → être extrêmement soucieux/euse de qch
(= easily disgusted) → délicat(e)

fastidious

adjgenau (→ about in Bezug auf +acc); (pej)pingelig (inf) (→ about in Bezug auf +acc)

fastidious

[fæˈstɪdɪəs] adj (person, about cleanliness) → pignolo/a; (in taste) → difficile, esigente

fastidious

(fəˈstidiəs) , ((American) fa-) adjective
very critical and difficult to please. She is so fastidious about her food that she will not eat in a restaurant.
faˈstidiously adverb
faˈstidiousness noun

fas·tid·i·ous

a. fastidioso-a, en bacteriología rel. a demandas nutricionales complejas.
References in classic literature ?
My sister Beth is a very fastidious girl, when she likes to be," said Amy, well pleased at Beth's success.
He was so fastidious and prim about his place that a boy would go to a good deal of trouble to throw a dead cat into his back yard, or to dump a sackful of tin cans in his alley.
At length his accurate and fastidious eye seemed satisfied, and, throwing out his left arm on the barrel, he was slowly elevating the muzzle, when an exclamation from Uncas, who sat in the bow, once more caused him to suspend the shot.
Consequently, when Christie and Jessie Carr proposed a ride through the adjacent canyon on the second morning, they had no difficulty in finding horses in the well- furnished stables of their opulent entertainers, nor cavaliers among the other guests, who were too happy to find favor in the eyes of the two pretty girls who were supposed to be abnormally fastidious and refined.
All the antique fashions of the street were dear to him; even such as were characterized by a rudeness that would naturally have annoyed his fastidious senses.
After my fellowship of toil and impracticable schemes with the dreamy brethren of Brook Farm; after living for three years within the subtle influence of an intellect like Emerson's; after those wild, free days on the Assabeth, indulging fantastic speculations, beside our fire of fallen boughs, with Ellery Channing; after talking with Thoreau about pine-trees and Indian relics in his hermitage at Walden; after growing fastidious by sympathy with the classic refinement of Hillard's culture; after becoming imbued with poetic sentiment at Longfellow's hearthstone -- it was time, at length, that I should exercise other faculties of my nature, and nourish myself with food for which I had hitherto had little appetite.
Wherefore, it seems to me you had best not be too fastidious in your curiosity touching this Leviathan.
In all the wide world, there was nothing that seemed to remind him so much of Eva; and he would insist on keeping him constantly about him, and, fastidious and unapproachable as he was with regard to his deeper feelings, he almost thought aloud to Tom.
She was a pretty creature, and she and her willow bough made a very pretty picture, and one which could not offend the modesty of the most fastidious spectator.
And he was really a very pleasing young man, a young man whom any woman not fastidious might like.
He is fastidious and will have an affectation of his own.
Their numbers were small; their stations in life obscure; the object of their enterprise unostentatious; the theatre of their exploits remote; how could they possibly be favorites of worldly Fame--that common crier, whose existence is only known by the assemblage of multitudes; that pander of wealth and greatness, so eager to haunt the palaces of fortune, and so fastidious to the houseless dignity of virtue; that parasite of pride, ever scornful to meekness, and ever obsequious to insolent power; that heedless trumpeter, whose ears are deaf to modest merit, and whose eyes are blind to bloodless, distant excellence?