fatidic


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fa·tid·ic

 (fə-tĭd′ĭk) also fa·tid·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
Relating to or characterized by prophecy; prophetic.

[Latin fātidicus : fātum, prophecy, doom; see fate + dīcere, to say; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

fatidic

(feɪˈtɪdɪk) or

fatidical

adj
rare prophetic
[C17: from Latin fātidicus, from fātum fate + dīcere to say]
faˈtidically adv

fa•tid•ic

(feɪˈtɪd ɪk, fə-)

also fa•tid′i•cal,



adj.
prophetic.
[1665–75; < Latin fātidicus]
fa•tid′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

fatidic

adjective
Of or relating to the foretelling of events by or as if by supernatural means:
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
What happened next was telling as a fatidic August 2004 meeting between Hariri and Al Assad sealed the premier's fate and, perhaps, the country's too.
The platonic apprehension to the fatidic power of the poets' statements seems to endure and, ergo, the much-wanted clarification provided by the poet himself has stood unverified for too long a time.
The fatidic accents that restrained Socrates or egged on Joaneta Dare have degenerated with me to the level of something one happens to hear between lifting and clapping down the receiver of a busy party-line telephone.
That fatidic letter is part of the Jewish Museum Berlin's online exhibit, which throughout 2013 is placing a fascinating selection of "On-this-day-in- 1933" documents, photos, and explanatory texts related to the Nazis' drastic first steps in the Holocaust as part of their efforts toward Gleichschaltung, which was the forced alignment of all official aspects of the state with the Nazi Party.
Marti's "passage to war," a fatidic phrase of Marti's, derived from an 1889 letter written to rebut a New York Evening Post portrayal of Cuban men as effeminate and incapable of fighting a winning war against Spain in an earlier revolution, eerily foretells of this 1895 odyssey.
Moreover, the fascination can also be aroused by ugly things, which are only attractive due to their fatidic, perverted features.
If we turn from the sight of that fatidic future, it is possible to describe other processes of the mimetic or creative appropriation of the other, or even project the mode of anthropophagic subjectivation onto the economic and political plane which has been defining Latin American countries.