fear


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Related to fear: phobia

fear

 (fîr)
n.
1.
a. A very unpleasant or disturbing feeling caused by the presence or imminence of danger: Our fears intensified as the storm approached.
b. A state or condition marked by this feeling: living in constant fear of attack; saved as much as he could for fear of losing his job.
2. A feeling of disquiet or apprehension: a fear of looking foolish.
3. A reason for dread or apprehension: Being alone is my greatest fear.
4. Extreme reverence or awe, as toward a deity.
v. feared, fear·ing, fears
v.tr.
1. To be afraid or frightened of: a boy who fears spiders.
2. To be uneasy or apprehensive about: We all feared what we would see when the grades were posted.
3. To consider probable; expect: I fear you are wrong. I fear I have bad news for you.
4. To revere or be in awe of (a deity, for example).
v.intr.
1. To be afraid: Your injury is minor. Don't fear.
2. To be uneasy or apprehensive: We fear for the future of the business.

[Middle English fer, from Old English fǣr, danger, sudden calamity; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

fear′er n.
Synonyms: fear, fright, dread, terror, horror, panic, alarm, trepidation, apprehension
These nouns denote the agitation and anxiety caused by the presence or imminence of danger. Fear is the most general term: a morbid fear of snakes; was filled with fear as the car skidded off the road. Fright is sudden, intense, usually momentary fear: "Pulling open the door, she started back in fright at the unknown face before hers" (Donna Morrissey).
Dread is visceral fear, especially in anticipation of something dangerous or unpleasant: felt a mounting dread as the battle approached; approached the oral exam with dread. Terror is intense, overpowering fear: "And now at the dead hour of the night ... so strange a noise as this excited me to uncontrollable terror" (Edgar Allan Poe).
Horror is a combination of fear and aversion or repugnance: reacted with horror to the news of the atrocities. Panic is sudden frantic fear, often affecting many people at the same time: The shoppers fled in panic at the sound of gunshots. Alarm is anxious concern caused by the first realization of danger or a setback: I watched with alarm as the sky darkened. Trepidation and apprehension are more formal terms for dread: "I awaited the X-ray afterward with trepidation" (Atul Gawande). "Now there were just the two of them ... and they were headed for the hospital ... and she was what calmed his apprehension and allowed him to be brave" (Philip Roth).

fear

(fɪə)
n
1. a feeling of distress, apprehension, or alarm caused by impending danger, pain, etc
2. a cause of this feeling
3. awe; reverence: fear of God.
4. concern; anxiety
5. possibility; chance: there is no fear of that happening.
6. for fear of for fear that for fear lest to forestall or avoid
7. no fear certainly not
8. put the fear of God into to frighten
vb
9. to be afraid (to do something) or of (a person or thing); dread
10. (tr) to revere; respect
11. (tr; takes a clause as object) to be sorry: used to lessen the effect of an unpleasant statement: I fear that you have not won.
12. (foll by: for) to feel anxiety about something
13. an archaic word for frighten
[Old English fǣr; related to Old High German fāra, Old Norse fār hostility, Latin perīculum danger]
ˈfearer n
ˈfearless adj
ˈfearlessly adv
ˈfearlessness n

fear

(fɪər)

n.
1. a distressing emotion aroused by impending danger, evil, pain, etc., whether the threat is real or imagined; the feeling or condition of being afraid.
2. a specific instance of or propensity for such a feeling: a fear of heights.
3. concern; solicitude: a fear for someone's safety.
4. reverential awe.
5. something that causes fright or apprehension.
v.t.
6. to regard with fear: to fear flying.
7. to be worried or afraid.
8. to have reverential awe of.
9. Archaic. to experience fear in (oneself).
v.i.
10. to be afraid.
[before 900; Middle English fere, Old English fær sudden attack or danger]

Fear

(fɪər)

n.
Cape, a cape in SE North Carolina at the mouth of Cape Fear River.

Fear

See also phobias.

the raising of the hairs on the skin as a response to cold or fear; goose bumps or goose pimples.
1. a nonspecific fear, a state of general anxiety.
2. an abnormal fear of everything. Also panphobia, pantaphobia, pantophobia. — panophobe, n. — panophobic, adj.
1. an abnormal fear of being af raid; a fear of fear itself.
2. a fear of phobias.
an abnormal fear of many things.

Fear

 

See Also: ANXIETY, EMOTIONS, NERVOUSNESS

  1. Afraid, as children in the dark —Dante Gabriel Rossetti
  2. An air of terrifying finality, like the clap of doom —Herbert Lieberman
  3. (A vague, uncatalogued) apprehension, as cold and disquieting as a first snowflake smudging the window of a warm and complacent room —Derek Lambert
  4. As courage imperils life, fear protects it —Leonardo Da Vinci
  5. As easily daunted as an elephant in the presence of a mouse —Ben Ames Williams
  6. Brute terrors, like the scurrying of rats in a deserted attic, filled the more remote chambers of his brain —Robert Louis Stevenson
  7. Cowardice, like alcoholism, is a lifelong condition —Susan Walton, New York Times/Hers, June 4, 1987

    The cowardice Walton is comparing to alcoholism is that which drives the person who always does what is expected and when.

  8. Cowardly as the hyena —Beryl Markham
  9. His cowardice … fixed him like an invisible cement, or like a nail —Cynthia Ozick
  10. Dreaded (her) like fire —Alexander Pushkin
  11. The dread in his lungs lay heavy as cold mud —Peter Matthiessen
  12. An eddy of fear swirled around her, like dust rising off the floor in some barren drafty place —Cornell Woolrich
  13. Fear … a little like the fear of a lover who realizes that he is falling out of love —May Sarton
  14. Fear … came and went like the throb of a nerve in an open tooth —James Warner Bellah
  15. Fear … clutching at his heart … as if tigers were tearing him —Willa Cather
  16. Fear … compressed me like a vise —Aharon Appelfeld
  17. Fear fell [on crowd] like the shadow of a cloud —John Greenleaf Whittier
  18. Fear … gnaws like pain —Dame Edith Sitwell
  19. Fearing them as much … as a nervous child with memory filled with ghost-stories fears a dark room —W. H. Hudson
  20. Fear is like a cloak which old men huddle about their love, as if to keep it warm —William Wordsworth
  21. Fear … lay on me like a slab of stone —Norman Mailer
  22. (In my body is a) fear like metal —Marilyn Hacker
  23. The fear of failure … blew like a Siberian wind on our unprotected backs —John Le Carré
  24. Fear oozed out (of the woods), as out of a cracked bottle —Dorothy Canfield Fisher
  25. Fear ran through him like a sickness —Brian Moore
  26. Fears … fell from him like dreams from a man waking up in bed —G. K. Chesterton
  27. Fear … sat heavy in the center of his body like a ball of badly digested food —George Garrett
  28. Fears came scurrying out from their hiding places like mice —Paige Mitchell
  29. Fear … seized all his bones like water —Hugh Walpole
  30. Fear shot through me like a jolt of electricity —Sue Grafton
  31. Fear spread like a common chill —Paige Mitchell

    See Also: SPREADING

  32. The fear [of death]… stood silent behind them like an inflexible and cold-eyed taskmaster —Joseph Conrad
  33. Fear stuck in his throat like a cotton hook —Charles Johnson
  34. Fear swelled like some terrible travail —Heinrich Böll
  35. Fear tangled his legs like a barricade —Harris Downey
  36. Fear tastes like a rusty knife —John Cheever
  37. Fear trills like an alarm bell you cannot shut off —John Updike
  38. Fear worked like yeast in my thoughts, and the fermentation brought to the surface, in great gobs of scum, the images of disaster —Evelyn Waugh
  39. Fear wrapped itself around his chest like a wide leather strap tightened by a maniac —François Camoin
  40. Feeling as if an ice pick had been plunged into his liver —Peter Benchley
  41. (I had) a feeling in my knees like a steering wheel with a shimmy —Rex Stout
  42. Feel like clammy fingers were poking at my very heart —Borden Deal
  43. Feel like a tight-rope walk high over hell —Kenneth Fearing
  44. Feels fear, like a water bubble in his throat —Jessie Schell
  45. Felt a chill … like swimming into a cold pocket in a lake —Tobias Wolff
  46. Felt a driblet of fear … like a glug of water backing up the momentarily opened drain and polluting the bath with a dead spider, three lice, a rat turd, and things he couldn’t stand to name or look at —Bernard Malamud
  47. Felt like a deer stepping out before the rifle of the hunter —Piers Anthony
  48. Felt like a nightmare that had yet to be dreamt —Stanislaw J. Lem
  49. Felt (the beginning of) panic, like a giant hand squeezing my heart —Frank Conroy
  50. Felt panicky, like he was in a bad dream where he did and said all the wrong things and couldn’t stop —Dan Wakefield
  51. Felt the chill of mortality … like a toddler gifted with some scraping edge of adult comprehension —Penelope Gilliatt

    See Also: DEATH

  52. Felt the sick, oppressive crush of dread, like pinpoint ashes —Sylvia Berkman
  53. A foreboding, dusky and cold like the room, crept to her side —Hugh Walpole
  54. Frightened as Macbeth before the ghost of Banquo —Louis Veuillot
  55. Frightened as though he had suddenly found himself at the edge of a precipice —Honore dé Balzac
  56. Frightened … like a man who is told he has a mortal illness, yet can cure it by jumping off a fifty-foot cliff into the water. “No,” he says, “I’ll stay in bed. I’d rather die.” —Norman Mailer
  57. Frightening … like one of those films where ghostly hands suddenly reach in and switch off all the lights —Robert E. Sherwood
  58. Fright stabbed his stomach like a sliver of glass —Arthur Miller
  59. Full of dread and timidness as conscripts to a firing squad doing —Richard Ford
  60. Gives me the creeps … like petting snakes —Raymond Chandler
  61. Glances round him like a lamb at a convocation of wolves —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  62. (Mildred’s) heart leapt with relief like a bird in her breast —Noël Coward
  63. A hiss of terror, like air whistling out of a punctured tire —Cornell Woolrich
  64. Horror should rise up like a clot of blood in the throat —Dylan Thomas
  65. [A group of children] huddled in a corner … like so many wide-eyed, trembling mice —Gregory McDonald
  66. I carry a scared silence with me like my smell —W. D. Snodgrass
  67. I pretend that my right foot is like a bottle. I pour my fears down into the toes and cork the whole thing at the ankle, so none of my fears can escape into the rest of me —Dorothy B. Francis
  68. My heart begins to pound like a thief s with the police after him —Isaac Bashevis Singer
  69. My heart in my throat like a wad of sour grease —George Garrett
  70. Panic, like a rabbit in front of the dogs —Peter Meinke
  71. Panic rose as thick as honey in my throat —R. Wright Campbell
  72. Panic shook her … as awful as if she had been tottering on a cliff in a roaring wind —Belva Plain
  73. Panic that was like asphyxiation —Penelope Gilliatt
  74. Ran terror-stricken, as if death were pursuing me —Aharon Megged
  75. Scared as a piss ant —Anon
  76. Scared … like a rabbit that spies a dog —Shelby Hearon
  77. Shivered with fear like a thin dog in the cold —Stephen Vincent Benét
  78. Take fear for granted like a drunken uncle —George Garrett
  79. Terrifying, like a Samurai sword in motion —Robert Silverberg
  80. Terrifying … like fingers clamped upon your throat —Beryl Markham
  81. Terror ebbed like water from a basin —Julia O’Faolain
  82. Terror … filled me as the sound of an explosion would fill a room —Scott Spencer
  83. The terror inside him acted like radar —James Mitchell
  84. Terror [of some hard to accomplish task] mocked, like some distant mountain peak —John Fowles
  85. Terrors that brushed her like a curtain windblown against her back —Andre Dubus
  86. (They) trail their fear behind them like a heavy shadow —Heinrich Böll

Fear

 

(See also ANXIETY.)

have one’s heart in one’s mouth To be frightened or scared, fearful or afraid, anxious or tense. The allusion is to the supposed leaping of the heart into the mouth upon experiencing a sudden jolt or start.

Having their heart at their very mouth for fear, they did not believe that it was Jesus. (Nicholas Udall, Erasmus upon the New Testament, translated 1548)

make the hair stand on end To terrify, to scare or frighten, to fill with fear. The allusion is to the way an animal’s hair, especially that on the back of the neck, involuntarily stiffens and becomes erect in the face of danger.

As for the particulars, I’m sure they’d make your hair stand on end to hear them. (Frances Burney, Evelina, 1778)

shake in one’s shoes To be petrified, terrified, panic-stricken; to be scared out of one’s wits. The expression is often applied figuratively to corporate as well as individual bodies.

It had set the whole Liberal party “shaking in its shoes.” (Punch, March 15, 1873)

Variations are quake or shake in one’s boots.

shake like an aspen leaf To tremble, quake; to shiver, quiver. This metaphor derives from the aspen tree with its delicate leaves perched atop long flexible stems that flutter even in the slightest breeze. The expression was used as early as 1386 by Chaucer in his Canterbury Tales.

fear

Fear can be a noun or a verb.

1. used as a noun

Fear is an unpleasant feeling that you have when you think you are in danger.

They huddled together, quaking with fear.
She was brought up with no fear of animals.

You do not say that someone 'feels fear'. You say that they are afraid or are frightened.

They were afraid of you. They knew you had killed many men.
Everyone here is frightened of the volcano.
2. used as a verb

If you fear someone or something, you are afraid of them.

...a woman whom he disliked and feared.
He fears nothing.

fear


Past participle: feared
Gerund: fearing

Imperative
fear
fear
Present
I fear
you fear
he/she/it fears
we fear
you fear
they fear
Preterite
I feared
you feared
he/she/it feared
we feared
you feared
they feared
Present Continuous
I am fearing
you are fearing
he/she/it is fearing
we are fearing
you are fearing
they are fearing
Present Perfect
I have feared
you have feared
he/she/it has feared
we have feared
you have feared
they have feared
Past Continuous
I was fearing
you were fearing
he/she/it was fearing
we were fearing
you were fearing
they were fearing
Past Perfect
I had feared
you had feared
he/she/it had feared
we had feared
you had feared
they had feared
Future
I will fear
you will fear
he/she/it will fear
we will fear
you will fear
they will fear
Future Perfect
I will have feared
you will have feared
he/she/it will have feared
we will have feared
you will have feared
they will have feared
Future Continuous
I will be fearing
you will be fearing
he/she/it will be fearing
we will be fearing
you will be fearing
they will be fearing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been fearing
you have been fearing
he/she/it has been fearing
we have been fearing
you have been fearing
they have been fearing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been fearing
you will have been fearing
he/she/it will have been fearing
we will have been fearing
you will have been fearing
they will have been fearing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been fearing
you had been fearing
he/she/it had been fearing
we had been fearing
you had been fearing
they had been fearing
Conditional
I would fear
you would fear
he/she/it would fear
we would fear
you would fear
they would fear
Past Conditional
I would have feared
you would have feared
he/she/it would have feared
we would have feared
you would have feared
they would have feared
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fear - an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)fear - an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)
emotion - any strong feeling
alarm, consternation, dismay - fear resulting from the awareness of danger
creeps - a feeling of fear and revulsion; "he gives me the creeps"
frisson, quiver, shudder, tingle, chill, thrill, shiver - an almost pleasurable sensation of fright; "a frisson of surprise shot through him"
horror - intense and profound fear
hysteria - excessive or uncontrollable fear
affright, panic, terror - an overwhelming feeling of fear and anxiety
panic attack, scare - a sudden attack of fear
stage fright - fear that affects a person about to face an audience
apprehension, apprehensiveness, dread - fearful expectation or anticipation; "the student looked around the examination room with apprehension"
timidity, timidness, timorousness - fear of the unknown or unfamiliar or fear of making decisions
intimidation - the feeling of being intimidated; being made to feel afraid or timid
cold sweat - the physical condition of concurrent perspiration and chill; associated with fear
fearlessness, bravery - feeling no fear
2.fear - an anxious feeling; "care had aged him"; "they hushed it up out of fear of public reaction"
anxiety - a vague unpleasant emotion that is experienced in anticipation of some (usually ill-defined) misfortune
3.fear - a feeling of profound respect for someone or somethingfear - a feeling of profound respect for someone or something; "the fear of God"; "the Chinese reverence for the dead"; "the French treat food with gentle reverence"; "his respect for the law bordered on veneration"
emotion - any strong feeling
Verb1.fear - be afraid or feel anxious or apprehensive about a possible or probable situation or event; "I fear she might get aggressive"
worry - be worried, concerned, anxious, troubled, or uneasy; "I worry about my job"
2.fear - be afraid or scared offear - be afraid or scared of; be frightened of; "I fear the winters in Moscow"; "We should not fear the Communists!"
panic - be overcome by a sudden fear; "The students panicked when told that final exams were less than a week away"
3.fear - be sorry; used to introduce an unpleasant statement; "I fear I won't make it to your wedding party"
regret - express with regret; "I regret to say that you did not gain admission to Harvard"
4.fear - be uneasy or apprehensive about; "I fear the results of the final exams"
5.fear - regard with feelings of respect and reverencefear - regard with feelings of respect and reverence; consider hallowed or exalted or be in awe of; "Fear God as your father"; "We venerate genius"
esteem, respect, value, prise, prize - regard highly; think much of; "I respect his judgement"; "We prize his creativity"
saint, enshrine - hold sacred
worship - show devotion to (a deity); "Many Hindus worship Shiva"

fear

noun
1. dread, horror, panic, terror, dismay, awe, fright, tremors, qualms, consternation, alarm, trepidation, timidity, fearfulness, blue funk (informal), apprehensiveness, cravenness I shivered with fear at the sound of gunfire.
2. bugbear, bête noire, horror, nightmare, anxiety, terror, dread, spectre, phobia, bogey, thing (informal) Flying was his greatest fear.
3. anxiety, concern, worry, doubt, nerves (informal), distress, suspicion, willies (informal), creeps (informal), butterflies (informal), funk (informal), angst, unease, apprehension, misgiving(s), nervousness, agitation, foreboding(s), uneasiness, solicitude, blue funk (informal), heebie-jeebies (informal), collywobbles (informal), disquietude His fear might be groundless.
4. possibility, likelihood There was no fear of her weeping.
5. awe, wonder, respect, worship, dread, reverence, veneration There is no fear of God before their eyes.
verb
1. be afraid of, dread, be scared of, be frightened of, shudder at, be fearful of, be apprehensive about, tremble at, be terrified by, have a horror of, take fright at, have a phobia about, have qualms about, live in dread of, be in a blue funk about (informal), have butterflies in your stomach about (informal), shake in your shoes about If people fear you they respect you.
2. worry, suspect, anticipate, be afraid, expect, foresee, apprehend She feared she was coming down with flu.
3. revere, respect, reverence, venerate, stand in awe of They feared God in a way which most modern men can hardly imagine.
4. regret, feel, suspect, have a feeling, have a hunch, have a sneaking suspicion, have a funny feeling I fear that a land war now looks probable.
fear for something or or someone worry about, be concerned about, be anxious about, tremble for, be distressed about, feel concern for, be disquieted over He fled, saying he feared for his life.
Related words
fear phobophobia
Quotations
"Let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself" [Franklin D. Roosevelt Inaugural Address]
"I cannot do this. This is too much for me. I shall ruin myself if I take this risk. I cannot take the leap, it's impossible. All of me will be gone if I do this and I cling to myself" [J.N. Figgis]
"Perfect love casteth out fear" Bible: 1 John
"Perfect fear casteth out love" [Cyril Connolly]

fear

noun
Great agitation and anxiety caused by the expectation or the realization of danger:
Slang: cold feet.
Idiom: fear and trembling.
verb
To be afraid of:
Idiom: have one's heart in one's mouth.
Translations
خَوْفيَأْسَفيَخافيَخافُخاف
respectartémer
strachbát seobávat sebát
frygtfrygteangstbære bange forbange for
timi
hirmkartmakartus
pelätäpelkokammo
strahbojati se
aggódik vkiértfélfélelem
hræîast; óttast umhræîsla, ótti, skelfingvera hræddur um
恐れる恐怖不安怖る恐れ
두려움두려워하다
baimingaibaimingasbe baimėsbebaimisbijodamas
baidītiesbailesbaiļotiesbažīties
fobiefricăteamăteme
báť sa
strahbati sebojazen
fruktarädasrädslaskräckvara rädd för
กลัวความกลัว
nỗi sợsợ

fear

[fɪəʳ]
A. N
1. (= terror) → miedo m
he has overcome his fear of dogsha superado su miedo a los perros
to be in fear of or for one's lifetemer por su propia vida
workers at the plant frequently went in fear of their livesa menudo los trabajadores de la fábrica temían por su vida
to live in fear of sth/sbvivir atemorizado por algo/algn
she lives in fear of being found outvive atemorizada de que la descubran
to have no fearno tener ningún miedo
have no fear! (archaic) (= don't be afraid) → ¡pierde cuidado!
fear of heightsmiedo m a las alturas
fear of flyingmiedo m a volar
in fear and tremblingtemblando de miedo
she was trembling with fearestaba temblando de miedo
without fear or favourcon imparcialidad, imparcialmente
to put the fear of God into sbmeter el miedo en el cuerpo a algn
2. (= worry) → temor m
his worst fears were confirmedsus mayores temores se vieron confirmados
there are fears thatse teme que + subjun
there are fears that he may be deadse teme que esté muerto
there were fears that he would raise taxesse temía que subiera los impuestos
I didn't go in for fear of disturbing themno entré por temor or miedo a molestarles
she never goes out for fear that it will happen againnunca sale por temor or miedo a que suceda de nuevo
there are grave fears for their safetyse teme enormemente por su seguridad
have no fear! (freq hum) (= don't worry) → ¡no se preocupe!
you need have no fear on that scoreno tenga miedo en ese sentido
3. (= chance) → posibilidad f; (= danger) → peligro m
there's not much fear of his comingno hay muchas posibilidades de que venga
there's no fear of that!¡no hay peligro de eso!
no fear!¡ni hablar!
B. VT
1. (= be afraid of) → temer, tener miedo a
I do not fear deathno temo a la muerte, no tengo miedo a la muerte
he was feared and hated by his subjectssus súbditos le temían y odiaban
to fear thattemer que + subjun
we feared that he would escapetemíamos que se escapara
they began to fear that he was dangerousempezaron a temer que fuera peligroso
two people are missing and feared deadhay dos personas desaparecidas y se teme que hayan muerto
to fear the worsttemer(se) lo peor
2. (= think regretfully) → temerse
to fear thattemerse que
I fear that he won't comeme temo que no vendrá
I fear that you are rightme temo que tiene razón
I fear you may be rightme temo que tenga razón
I fear so/notme temo que sí/no
3. (= respect) [+ God] → temer
C. VItemer
to fear for sth/sbtemer por algo/algn
she feared for her lifetemía por su vida
I fear for himtemo por él, tengo miedo por él
never fearno hay cuidado

fear

[ˈfɪər]
n
(= fright) → peur f (= apprehension) (of something that may happen)crainte f
to shake with fear → trembler de peur
to live without fear → vivre sans crainte
her worst fears were realized → ses pires craintes devinrent réalité
my greatest fear is that ... → ce que je redoute par-dessus tout, c'est que ...
fear of the dark → peur du noir
fear of spiders → peur des araignées
fear of heights → vertige m
fear of failure → peur de l'échec, crainte de l'échec
to be in fear of sth/sb → avoir peur de qch/qn, craindre qch/qn
to be in fear of one's life → craindre pour sa vie
fears are growing that ... → on craint de plus en plus que ...
for fear of → de peur de + infin, de peur que + subj
They did not mention it for fear of annoying him → Ils n'en ont pas parlé de peur de le contrarier., Ils n'en ont pas parlé de peur qu'il ne se contrarie.
(= risk, chance) there's no fear of that → ça ne risque pas d'arriver
no fear! → il n'y a pas de danger!
vt
[+ person, thing] → craindre
You have nothing to fear → Vous n'avez rien à craindre.
a woman whom he disliked and feared → une femme qu'il n'aimait pas et qu'il craignait, une femme qu'il n'aimait pas et dont il avait peur
An epidemic of plague was feared
BUT On redoutait une épidémie de peste.
More than two million refugees have fled the area, fearing attack
BUT Plus de 2 millions de réfugiés ont fui la région, dans la crainte d'une attaque.
to be feared dead
Twenty people are feared dead after the explosion → Vingt personnes auraient perdu la vie dans l'explosion.
to fear (that) ... → craindre que ...
vi
to fear for [+ person] → craindre pour; [+ one's future, one's safety] → craindre pour
to fear for one's life → craindre pour sa vie
fear not! (= don't worry) → n'ayez crainte!
never fear! (= don't worry) → ne craignez rien!

fear

n
Angst f, → Furcht f (→ for vor +dat); fears for the futureZukunftsängste pl; fear of death/failureTodes-/Versagensangst f; fear of flyingFlugangst f, → Angst fvorm Fliegen; fear of heightsHöhenangst f; he has fears for his sister’s safetyer fürchtet für or um die Sicherheit seiner Schwester; there are fears that …es wird befürchtet, dass …; have no fear (old, hum)fürchte dich nicht (old, hum); with fear and tremblingmit schlotternden Knien; to be in fear of somebody/somethingAngst vor jdm/etw haben; to go or live in fear of somebody/somethingin (ständiger) Angst vor jdm/etw leben; he lived in fear of being discovereder lebte in ständiger Angst davor, entdeckt zu werden; to be in fear of one’s lifeum sein Leben bangen; for fear that …aus Angst, dass …; she talked quietly for fear of waking the babysie sprach leise, um das Baby nicht aufzuwecken; without fear or favour (Brit) or favor (US) → ganz gerecht
no pl (= risk, likelihood) no fear! (inf)nie im Leben! (inf); there’s no fear of that happening againkeine Angst, das passiert so leicht nicht wieder; there’s not much fear of his comingwir brauchen kaum Angst zu haben, dass er kommt
(= awe: of God) → Scheu f, → Ehrfurcht f; to put the fear of God into somebody (inf)jdm gewaltig Angst einjagen (inf)
vt
(= be afraid of)(be)fürchten; I fear the worstich befürchte das Schlimmste; he’s a man to be feareder ist ein Mann, den man fürchten muss; many women fear to go out at nightviele Frauen haben Angst davor, abends auszugehen
(= feel awe for) GodEhrfurcht haben vor (+dat)
vi to fear forfürchten für or um; never fear!keine Angst!

fear

[fɪəʳ]
1. npaura, timore m
there are fears that ... → si teme che...
grave fears have arisen for ... → si nutrono seri timori per...
for fear of sb/of doing sth → per paura di qn/di fare qc
for fear that → per paura di (or che + sub)
to live in fear of sb/sth/doing sth → vivere con la paura di qn/qc/fare qc
to go in fear of one's life/of being discovered → temere per la propria vita/di essere scoperto/a
fear of heights → vertigini fpl
fear of enclosed spaces → claustrofobia
have no fear! → non temere!
in fear and trembling → tremante di paura
to put the fear of God into sb (fam) → far venire una paura del diavolo a qn
without fear nor favour → imparzialmente
no fear! (fam) → neanche per sogno!
there's no fear of that! → neanche per sogno!
there's not much fear of his coming → non c'è pericolo che venga
2. vt (person, God) → temere, avere paura di
to fear the worst → temere il peggio
to fear that → temere di (or che +sub), avere paura di (or che +sub)
I fear I/he may be late → temo di essere in ritardo/che sia in ritardo
I fear so/not → temo di sì/di no, ho paura di sì/di no
3. vi to fear fortemere per, essere in ansia per

fear

(fiə) noun
(a) feeling of great worry or anxiety caused by the knowledge of danger. The soldier tried not to show his fear; fear of water.
verb
1. to feel fear because of (something). She feared her father when he was angry; I fear for my father's safety (= I am worried because I think he is in danger).
2. to regret. I fear you will not be able to see him today.
ˈfearful adjective
1. afraid. a fearful look.
2. terrible. The lion gave a fearful roar.
3. very bad. a fearful mistake!
ˈfearfully adverb
ˈfearless adjective
without fear; brave. a fearless soldier.
ˈfearlessly adverb
for fear of
so as not to. She would not go swimming for fear of catching a cold.
in fear of
in a state of being afraid of. He lived in fear of his mother.

fear

خَوْف, يَخافُ bát se, strach frygt, frygte Angst, fürchten φοβάμαι, φόβος miedo, temer pelätä, pelko craindre, peur bojati se, strah paura, temere 不安, 恐れる 두려움, 두려워하다 angst, bang zijn frykt, frykte bać się, obawa medo, temer бояться, страх rädsla, vara rädd för กลัว, ความกลัว korkmak, korku nỗi sợ, sợ 害怕

fear

n. temor, miedo, aprehensión;
v. temer, tener miedo.

fear

n miedo, temor m; fear of needles..miedo a las agujas
References in classic literature ?
was more suggestive of pins being run into her than of fear and anguish.
For a moment he stood thus, rubbing his hands together and looking up and down the road, and then, fear overcoming him, ran back to walk again upon the porch on his own house.
His hands have something to do with his fear of me and of everyone.
But we have no sickness, we have no fear, because we carry that blood and that body of Christ, and it preserve us.
I fear they made more impression on me than I made on them.
A friend recently took a job, only to quit one week later because fear in the department was oppressive, placing a dark cloud over the workplace.
The subject of fear is what the play Fear Industry, which was performed on Monday and will play again on Thursday in Nicosia, is all about.
I have also heard about a very strange and funny fear and would like to share with you all.
com) reveal the majority of Americans struggle with all sorts of irrational and unnecessary fears - from fear of public speaking to fear of death.
A new study in mice, published online today in Neuron, reports that exposure therapy remodels an inhibitory junction in the amygdala, a brain region important for fear in mice and humans.
AGMENOPHOBIA The fear that the queue you join will be slower than the other one.
Fear Survey Schedule For Children--Revised (FSSC-R) questionnaire was administered and school children are asked to indicate their level of fear to various stimuli and situations on a 3-point scale: 'none', 'some', 'a lot'.