fearmonger


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fearmonger

(ˈfɪəˌmʌŋɡə)
n
a person who spreads fear
ˈfearˌmongering n
References in periodicals archive ?
Kris Kobach of Kansas: The torchbearer for the anti-immigration movement, Kobach, who is also running for governor next year, serves as vice chairman of Trump's election integrity commission, allowing him to fearmonger about voter fraud and push for restrictive voting laws at the national level.
We cannot sacrifice community safety, environmental health or our public lands for a false sense of security that uses debunked myths to fearmonger and ignite hateful actions.
Natural Resources Minister Donna Cansfield says she doesn't intend to be a fearmonger.
In song she is murky, creepily inviting and frightening, both fearmonger and soothsayer.
I'm used to being called a fearmonger when I warn that all the progress we've made can be rolled back, but consider the laws that have been passed recently.
This professional fearmonger switched from studying butterflies to doomsaying in 1968, when he published The Population Bomb (Ballantine Books).
In ninety minutes, Gore slammed Perot as greedy and corrupt, an isolationist, and a fearmonger.
Joseph McCarthy as a fearmonger, simply for the money.
I run into veteran fearmonger Don McAlvany, part of the Brooks Brothers faction of the militia movement.
The complexity of the world is difficult to summarise in two words, unlike the "us" and "them" discourse of fearmongers and would-be wall builders.
Fearmongers talk up the threat of a spike in terrorism.
General Mattis engages in the standard military operating procedure of threat-inflation on a regular basis, which does not distinguish him from two generations of other official military and executive branch fearmongers scaring us with apparent North Korean intentions, even while driving those intentions with real, constant American threatening.