feast


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feast

 (fēst)
n.
1.
a. A large, elaborately prepared meal, usually for many persons and often accompanied by entertainment; a banquet.
b. A meal that is well prepared and abundantly enjoyed.
2. A periodic religious festival commemorating an event or honoring a god or saint.
3. Something giving great pleasure or satisfaction: a book that is a veritable feast for the mind.
v. feast·ed, feast·ing, feasts
v.tr.
To give a feast for; entertain or feed sumptuously: feasted the guests on venison.
v.intr.
1. To partake of a feast; eat heartily.
2. To experience something with gratification or delight: feasted on the view.
Idiom:
feast (one's) eyes on
To be delighted or gratified by the sight of: We feasted our eyes on the paintings.

[Middle English feste, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *fēsta, from Latin, pl. of fēstum, from fēstus, festive; see dhēs- in Indo-European roots.]

feast′er n.

feast

(fiːst)
n
1. a large and sumptuous meal, usually given as an entertainment for several people
2. a periodic religious celebration
3. something extremely pleasing or sumptuous: a feast for the eyes.
4. movable feast a festival or other event of variable date
vb
5. (intr)
a. to eat a feast
b. (usually foll by on) to enjoy the eating (of), as if feasting: to feast on cakes.
6. (tr) to give a feast to
7. (foll by: on) to take great delight (in): to feast on beautiful paintings.
8. (tr) to regale or delight: to feast one's mind or one's eyes.
[C13: from Old French feste, from Latin festa, neuter plural (later assumed to be feminine singular) of festus joyful; related to Latin fānum temple, fēriae festivals]
ˈfeaster n

feast

(fist)

n.
1. any rich or abundant meal.
2. a sumptuous entertainment or meal for many guests: a wedding feast.
3. something highly agreeable or satisfying.
4. a periodical celebration or time of celebration, usu. of a religious nature, commemorating an event, person, etc.
v.i.
5. to partake of a feast; eat sumptuously.
6. to dwell with gratification or delight, as on a picture or view.
v.t.
7. to provide or entertain with a feast.
Idioms:
feast one's eyes, to gaze with great joy, admiration, or relish.
[1150–1200; Middle English feste < Old French < Latin fēsta]
feast′er, n.
feast′less, adj.

Feast

 the company at a feast, collectively.
Examples: feast of brewers; of quests, 1400.

feast


Past participle: feasted
Gerund: feasting

Imperative
feast
feast
Present
I feast
you feast
he/she/it feasts
we feast
you feast
they feast
Preterite
I feasted
you feasted
he/she/it feasted
we feasted
you feasted
they feasted
Present Continuous
I am feasting
you are feasting
he/she/it is feasting
we are feasting
you are feasting
they are feasting
Present Perfect
I have feasted
you have feasted
he/she/it has feasted
we have feasted
you have feasted
they have feasted
Past Continuous
I was feasting
you were feasting
he/she/it was feasting
we were feasting
you were feasting
they were feasting
Past Perfect
I had feasted
you had feasted
he/she/it had feasted
we had feasted
you had feasted
they had feasted
Future
I will feast
you will feast
he/she/it will feast
we will feast
you will feast
they will feast
Future Perfect
I will have feasted
you will have feasted
he/she/it will have feasted
we will have feasted
you will have feasted
they will have feasted
Future Continuous
I will be feasting
you will be feasting
he/she/it will be feasting
we will be feasting
you will be feasting
they will be feasting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been feasting
you have been feasting
he/she/it has been feasting
we have been feasting
you have been feasting
they have been feasting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been feasting
you will have been feasting
he/she/it will have been feasting
we will have been feasting
you will have been feasting
they will have been feasting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been feasting
you had been feasting
he/she/it had been feasting
we had been feasting
you had been feasting
they had been feasting
Conditional
I would feast
you would feast
he/she/it would feast
we would feast
you would feast
they would feast
Past Conditional
I would have feasted
you would have feasted
he/she/it would have feasted
we would have feasted
you would have feasted
they would have feasted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.feast - a ceremonial dinner party for many peoplefeast - a ceremonial dinner party for many people
dinner party, dinner - a party of people assembled to have dinner together; "guests should never be late to a dinner party"
gaudy - (Britain) a celebratory reunion feast or entertainment held a college
2.feast - something experienced with great delight; "a feast for the eyes"
thing - an event; "a funny thing happened on the way to the..."
3.feast - a meal that is well prepared and greatly enjoyedfeast - a meal that is well prepared and greatly enjoyed; "a banquet for the graduating seniors"; "the Thanksgiving feast"; "they put out quite a spread"
meal, repast - the food served and eaten at one time
4.feast - an elaborate party (often outdoors)feast - an elaborate party (often outdoors)
party - an occasion on which people can assemble for social interaction and entertainment; "he planned a party to celebrate Bastille Day"
luau - an elaborate Hawaiian feast or party (especially one accompanied by traditional foods and entertainment)
potlatch - a ceremonial feast held by some Indians of the northwestern coast of North America (as in celebrating a marriage or a new accession) in which the host gives gifts to tribesmen and others to display his superior wealth (sometimes, formerly, to his own impoverishment)
Verb1.feast - partake in a feast or banquetfeast - partake in a feast or banquet  
eat - eat a meal; take a meal; "We did not eat until 10 P.M. because there were so many phone calls"; "I didn't eat yet, so I gladly accept your invitation"
banquet, feast, junket - provide a feast or banquet for
wine and dine - eat sumptuously; "we wined and dined in Paris"
2.feast - provide a feast or banquet forfeast - provide a feast or banquet for  
feast, banquet, junket - partake in a feast or banquet
host - be the host of or for; "We hosted 4 couples last night"
3.feast - gratify; "feed one's eyes on a gorgeous view"
regale, treat - provide with choice or abundant food or drink; "Don't worry about the expensive wine--I'm treating"; "She treated her houseguests with good food every night"

feast

noun
1. banquet, repast, spread (informal), dinner, entertainment, barbecue, revel, junket, beano (Brit. slang), blowout (slang), carouse, slap-up meal (Brit. informal), beanfeast (Brit. informal), jollification, carousal, festive board, treat Lunch was a feast of meat, vegetables, cheese, and wine.
3. treat, delight, pleasure, enjoyment, gratification, cornucopia Chicago provides a feast for the ears of any music lover.
verb
1. eat your fill, wine and dine, overindulge, eat to your heart's content, stuff yourself, consume, indulge, hoover (informal), gorge, devour, pig out (slang), stuff your face (slang), fare sumptuously, gormandize We feasted on cakes and ice cream.
feast your eyes on something or someone look at with delight, gaze at, devour with your eyes She stood feasting her eyes on the view.

feast

noun
A large meal elaborately prepared or served:
Informal: feed, spread.
phrasal verb
feast on
To be avidly interested in:
Translations
عيدوَليمَه، مأدُبَهيَتَناوَل طَعاما، يَشْتَرِك في مأدُبَه
hostinasvátekhodovat
festmåltidguffe i sighelligdag
herkutella
lakomalakomán részt veszünnepi lakomaünnepnap
gera sér glaîan daghátíîveisla
puotautišventė
dzīresdzīrotmielastsmielotiessvētki
hodovaťhostina
gostija
bayramyiyip içmekyortuziyafet

feast

[fiːst]
A. N
1. (= meal) → banquete m (= big meal) → comilona f, tragadera f (Mex)
it's feast or faminecuando mucho, cuando nada
2. (Rel) → fiesta f
3. (fig) (= treat) the film promises a feast of special effectsla película promete ser un derroche de efectos especiales
B. VT (o.f. or liter) [+ guest] → agasajar
to feast one's eyes on sth/sbregalarse la vista con algo/algn
C. VIdarse un banquete
to feast on sthdarse un banquete con algo
D. CPD feast day N (Rel) → fiesta f, día m festivo

feast

[ˈfiːst]
n
(= meal) → festin m, banquet m wedding feast, midnight feast
(fig)
a feast of special effects → un bouquet d'effets spéciaux
We are giving the viewers a feast of football → Nous offrons aux téléspectateurs une véritable fête du football.
We have a veritable feast of video entertainment to be won → Nous vous offrons une multitude de cassettes vidéo à gagner.
(also feast day) (= religious festival) → fête f moveable feast
vi
(= eat) → festoyer
to feast on sth [+ food] → se régaler de qch
vt
to feast one's eyes on sth/sb → se délecter à la vue de qch/qn

feast

n
(= banquet)Festmahl nt, → Festessen nt; a wedding feastein Hochzeitsmahl nt (geh); a feast for the eyeseine Augenweide; a feast of entertainmenterstklassige Unterhaltung; it’s feast or famine (fig)alles oder nichts
(Eccl, Rel) → Fest nt; feast dayFesttag m, → Feiertag m; movable/immovable feastbeweglicher/unbeweglicher Feiertag
vi (lit)Festgelage pl/ein Festgelage halten; to feast on somethingsich an etw (dat)gütlich tun; (person also)in etw (dat)schwelgen; (fig)sich an etw (dat)weiden
vt
guestfestlich bewirten; to feast oneselfsich gütlich tun (→ on an +dat); (person also)schwelgen (→ on in +dat)
to feast one’s eyes on somebody/somethingseine Augen an jdm/etw weiden

feast

[fiːst]
1. n (meal) → pranzo, banchetto (Rel) (fig) → festa
feast day → festa, festività f inv
2. vt to feast one's eyes on sth/sbdeliziarsi alla vista di qc/qn
3. vibanchettare
to feast on sth → banchettare a qc

feast

(fiːst) noun
1. a large and rich meal, usually eaten to celebrate some occasion. The king invited them to a feast in the palace.
2. (sometimes with capital) a particular day on which some (especially religious) person or event is remembered and celebrated. Today is the feast of St Stephen.
verb
to eat (as if) at a feast. We feasted all day.
References in classic literature ?
I could not refuse, and so you have a little feast at night to make up for the bread-and-milk breakfast.
There was a feast and a sort of celebration in camp that night.
He exaggerated every detail, making it appear a veritable Lucullean feast.
True, lad, true," interrupted the impatient old man; "you were about opening your mind more fully on that matter the day you got in, but I did not think it becoming in an old soldier to be talking of nuptial blessings and wedding jokes when the enemies of his king were likely to be unbidden guests at the feast.
The crumbs and discoloration of the cannibal feast, as yet hardly consummated, were exceedingly visible about his mouth.
The people of his island of Rokovoko, it seems, at their wedding feasts express the fragrant water of young cocoanuts into a large stained calabash like a punchbowl; and this punchbowl always forms the great central ornament on the braided mat where the feast is held.
But who can tell --he muttered -- whether these sharks swim to feast on the whale or on ahab?
This information is definite and suited to the matter of fact; but how pitifully inadequate it would have seemed to one who understood that it was also the supreme hour of ecstasy in the life of one of God's gentlest creatures, the scene of the wedding feast and the joy-transfiguration of little Ona Lukoszaite!
The poor soul had expended all her little energies on this farewell feast,--had killed and dressed her choicest chicken, and prepared her corn-cake with scrupulous exactness, just to her husband's taste, and brought out certain mysterious jars on the mantel-piece, some preserves that were never produced except on extreme occasions.
From time to time I dipped into old Sir Thomas Malory's enchanting book, and fed at its rich feast of prodigies and adventures, breathed in the fragrance of its obsolete names, and dreamed again.
A few steps cut in the WHOOPJAMBOREEHOO enabled us to walk completely under this, and feast our eyes upon one of the loveliest objects in creation.
They had a famous fried-egg feast that night, and another on Friday morning.