feat


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feat 1

 (fēt)
n.
1. An act or accomplishment of great courage, skill, or imagination; an achievement.
2. Obsolete A specialized skill; a knack.

[Middle English fet, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin factum, from neuter past participle of facere, to make, do; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: feat1, achievement, exploit, masterstroke
These nouns denote an extraordinary deed or action: feats of bravery; achievements of diplomacy; military exploits; a masterstroke of entrepreneurship.

feat 2

 (fēt)
adj. feat·er, feat·est Archaic
1. Adroit; dexterous.
2. Neat; trim.

[Middle English fet, suitable, from Old French fait, from Latin factus, done, made; see feature.]

feat′ly adv.

feat

(fiːt)
n
a remarkable, skilful, or daring action; exploit; achievement: feats of strength.
[C14: from Anglo-French fait, from Latin factum deed; see fact]

feat

(fiːt)
adj
1. another word for skilful
2. another word for neat1, suitable
[C14: from Old French fet, from Latin factus made, from facere to make]

feat1

(fit)

n.
a noteworthy or extraordinary act or achievement, usu. displaying boldness, skill, etc.: an athletic feat; a feat of heroism.
[1300–50; Middle English fet, fait < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin factum; see fact]

feat2

(fit)

adj. -er, -est. Archaic.
1. apt; skillful; dexterous.
2. suitable.
3. neat.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French fait made (to fit) < Latin factus, past participle of facere to make, do]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.feat - a notable achievementfeat - a notable achievement; "he performed a great feat"; "the book was her finest effort"
accomplishment, achievement - the action of accomplishing something
derring-do - brave and heroic feats
hit - (baseball) a successful stroke in an athletic contest (especially in baseball); "he came all the way around on Williams' hit"
rally, rallying - the feat of mustering strength for a renewed effort; "he singled to start a rally in the 9th inning"; "he feared the rallying of their troops for a counterattack"
stunt - a difficult or unusual or dangerous feat; usually done to gain attention
tour de force - a masterly or brilliant feat

feat

feat

noun
1. A great or heroic deed:
2. Something completed or attained successfully:
3. A clever, dexterous act:
Translations
مَفْخَرَه، عَمَل بُطولي، مأثَرَه
činvýkonkousek
præstationbedrift
saavutus
sasniegumsvarondarbs
skutok
junaško dejanjemojstrsko dejanje
cesaret ve ustalık isteyen bir iş

feat

[fiːt] Nhazaña f, proeza f

feat

[ˈfiːt] nexploit m, prouesse f
a brilliant feat of engineering (= process) → une formidable prouesse technologique (= thing created) → un chef d'œuvre de technologie

feat

nLeistung f; (heroic, courageous etc) → Heldentat f; (skilful) → Kunststück nt, → Meisterleistung f; a feat of courage/daringeine mutige/wagemutige Tat

feat

[fiːt] nimpresa, prodezza
a feat of engineering → un trionfo dell'ingegneria
that was quite a feat → è stata un'impresa non da poco

feat

(fiːt) noun
an impressive act or achievement. Building the pyramids was a brilliant feat of engineering.
References in classic literature ?
But it is no such marvelous feat to exhibit the feats of so dull a beast; though, for that matter, too, a bear may be overacted.
As he still nervously retained the two hands he had grasped, this would have been a difficult feat, even had he not endeavored at the same moment, by a backward furtive kick, to propel the hat out of the window, at which she laughingly broke from his grasp and flew to the rescue.
Now, the beheading of the Sperm Whale is a scientific anatomical feat, upon which experienced whale surgeons very much pride themselves; and not without reason.
It was quite like the feat of a prestidigitator--for the woman worked so fast that the eye could literally not follow her, and there was only a mist of motion, and tangle after tangle of sausages appearing.
I ordered Harris to make the ascent, so I could put the thrill and horror of it in my book, and he accomplished the feat successfully, though a subagent, for three francs, which I paid.
My favourite seat was a smooth and broad stone, rising white and dry from the very middle of the beck, and only to be got at by wading through the water; a feat I accomplished barefoot.
Crupp consented to achieve this feat, on condition that I dined from home for a fortnight afterwards.
He remembered having crossed the road and seen the finger-post only a little while before Wildfire broke down; so, buttoning his coat, twisting the lash of his hunting-whip compactly round the handle, and rapping the tops of his boots with a self-possessed air, as if to assure himself that he was not at all taken by surprise, he set off with the sense that he was undertaking a remarkable feat of bodily exertion, which somehow and at some time he should be able to dress up and magnify to the admiration of a select circle at the Rainbow.
This feat of horsemanship again attracted the applause of the multitude.
This special despatch of the Globe has been transmitted by telephone in the presence of twenty people, who have thus been witnesses to a feat never before attempted--the sending of news over the space of sixteen miles by the human voice.
Sir," answered Don Quixote, "that cannot be on any account omitted, and the knight-errant would be disgraced who acted otherwise: for it is usual and customary in knight-errantry that the knight-errant, who on engaging in any great feat of arms has his lady before him, should turn his eyes towards her softly and lovingly, as though with them entreating her to favour and protect him in the hazardous venture he is about to undertake, and even though no one hear him, he is bound to say certain words between his teeth, commending himself to her with all his heart, and of this we have innumerable instances in the histories.
Little John from his hiding-place saw the feat, and could hardly restrain a long whistle.