featherhead


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feath·er·head

 (fĕth′ər-hĕd′)
n.
A featherbrain.

feath′er·head′ed adj.

feath•er•brain

(ˈfɛð ərˌbreɪn)

n.
a foolish or giddy person; scatterbrain.
[1830–40]
feath′er•brained`, adj.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
I said as much to Clarence; but this mock- ing featherhead only said:
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Brown of Cinnamon Lane in Featherhead, Warrington, had previously pleaded guilty to speeding by letter but he was asked to attend, so that a disqualification could be considered.
Macarena": The Macarena is the imbecile's dance/It gives the morons and idiots a chance,/To show the talents of which they have none/Except to show off and have some fun//It was invented by a featherhead,/Who got up and left his brains in bed.
in the Prado the dwarves the lamp-jawed Infantes the featherhead Counts
Alex, a 23-year-old African gray parrot, won't be taking the SATs, but he's no featherhead, says his owner, University of Arizona scientist Irene Pepperberg.
The performance of the Featherheads showcased the exotic heritage of the Tangkhul community, whereas the Nagaland Chamber Choir and various other homegrown artists presented songs on the occasion.
She used her newly acquired skills to write Featherheads, which tells how the lives of an elderly couple were affected by Alzheimer's disease.
If Oprah Winfrey can get huge numbers of women usually dismissed as romance-reading featherheads to tackle challenging novels by Toni Morrison and Ursula Hegi by talking her audience through them in a warm, enthusiastic, unscary, we're-all-in-this-together way, think what the government could do if it was willing to spend a little money to enlarge our minds and broaden our tastes a bit.
I was thinking: oh, these women, these dimwits, these featherheads, but never to such a degree