feathering


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feath·er·ing

 (fĕth′ər-ĭng)
n.
1. Plumage.
2. The feathers fitted to an arrow.
3. A fringe of hair on an animal's coat, especially on a dog's leg.

feathering

(ˈfɛðərɪŋ)
n
1. (Zoology) the plumage of a bird; feathers
2. (Zoology) another word for feathers2
3. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing
a. an imperfection in print caused by the spreading of ink
b. the use of additional space between lines in typesetting in order to fill the page

feath•er•ing

(ˈfɛð ər ɪŋ)

n.
1. a covering of feathers; plumage.
2. the arrangement of feathers on an arrow.
3. a long fringe of hair, as on the legs of a dog or the legs of a horse; feather.
[1520–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.feathering - turning an oar parallel to the water between pulls
rotary motion, rotation - the act of rotating as if on an axis; "the rotation of the dancer kept time with the music"
rowing, row - the act of rowing as a sport
Translations

feathering

[ˈfeðərɪŋ] Nplumaje m
References in classic literature ?
But these were broken again by the light toes of hundreds of gay fowl softly feathering the sea, alternate with their fitful flight; and like to some flag-staff rising from the painted hull of an argosy, the tall but shattered pole of a recent lance projected from the white whale's back; and at intervals one of the cloud of soft-toed fowls hovering, and to and fro skimming like a canopy over the fish, silently perched and rocked on this pole, the long tail feathers streaming like pennons.
In this way, they hovered round him, feathering him with arrows, as he reared and plunged about, until he was bristled all over like a porcupine.
They were ready for a dance in half a second (Meg and Richard at the top); and the Drum was on the very brink of feathering away with all his power; when a combination of prodigious sounds was heard outside, and a good-humoured comely woman of some fifty years of age, or thereabouts, came running in, attended by a man bearing a stone pitcher of terrific size, and closely followed by the marrow-bones and cleavers, and the bells; not THE Bells, but a portable collection on a frame.