feedgrain

feedgrain

(ˈfiːdˌɡreɪn)
n
any cereal grown to feed livestock

feed′grain`

or feed′ grain`,



n.
any cereal grain used as a feed for livestock, poultry, or other animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Propionic acid keeps feedgrain fresh for a long time because it prevents molding.
Tightening supply of available feeder cattle, drought in the US and surging feedgrain and hay prices are factors which likely contributed to the lower placements, which could come out at the lowest level for September since the new series began in 1996.
The Northeast and North Central feedgrain and cow/calf farms have an average debt to asset ratio of 64% compared to an average of 20% for the nine existing Missouri feedgrain and cow/calf farms.
The bulk of this increase is in corn and other feedgrain costs, and we believe that the ethanol program is by far the biggest factor in rising feedgrain costs.
While the vast majority of our Kansas corn growers raise field corn, which is a feedgrain, this research is valuable because it helps us understand how vegetable farmers also rely on atrazine, according to Jere White, Executive Director of the Kansas Corn Growers Association.
Cattlemen can deal with the highs and lows of the grain market, and the nation's renewable fuels policy certainly isn't the only cause of higher feedgrain prices.
Our long-term forecast calls for corn-planted area to be 85 million acres by 2009, an increase of seven percent," said Marty Foreman, Doane's feedgrain economist.
Grains in China; foodgrain, feedgrain, and world trade.
Feedgrain is a big proportion of variable cost in parts of the livestock industry -- perhaps 70% for pigs, for instance, and more for poultry.
Research supported in part by the Louisiana Soybean and Feedgrain Research and Promotion Board.
Brown and Halweil point out in their article that: "As incomes rise, people are consuming more pork, poultry, beef, and eggs, and feedgrain use is growing.