feedgrain

feedgrain

(ˈfiːdˌɡreɪn)
n
any cereal grown to feed livestock

feed′grain`

or feed′ grain`,



n.
any cereal grain used as a feed for livestock, poultry, or other animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wheat and rice are the world's food staples, while corn is the feedgrain for livestock and poultry.
Tightening supply of available feeder cattle, drought in the US and surging feedgrain and hay prices are factors which likely contributed to the lower placements, which could come out at the lowest level for September since the new series began in 1996.
The bulk of this increase is in corn and other feedgrain costs, and we believe that the ethanol program is by far the biggest factor in rising feedgrain costs.
Cattlemen can deal with the highs and lows of the grain market, and the nation's renewable fuels policy certainly isn't the only cause of higher feedgrain prices.
Our long-term forecast calls for corn-planted area to be 85 million acres by 2009, an increase of seven percent," said Marty Foreman, Doane's feedgrain economist.
Grains in China; foodgrain, feedgrain, and world trade.
Feedgrain is a big proportion of variable cost in parts of the livestock industry -- perhaps 70% for pigs, for instance, and more for poultry.
Brown and Halweil point out in their article that: "As incomes rise, people are consuming more pork, poultry, beef, and eggs, and feedgrain use is growing.
A: An energy tax would raise the cost of fertilizer, which would raise the cost of feedgrain, which would give farmers an incentive to use less of it.
NCC estimates that higher feedgrain prices due largely to the ethanol program have cost companies in the broiler chicken industry more than $6 billion since October 2006.
is the leading producer and exporter of com, the world's number-one feedgrain.