feeler

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Related to feelers: put out feelers

feel·er

 (fē′lər)
n.
1. Something, such as a hint or question, designed to elicit the attitudes or intentions of others.
2. Zoology A sensory or tactile organ, such as an antenna, tentacle, or barbel.

feeler

(ˈfiːlə)
n
1. a person or thing that feels
2. (Zoology) an organ in certain animals, such as an antenna or tentacle, that is sensitive to touch
3. a remark designed to probe the reactions or intentions of other people

feel•er

(ˈfi lər)

n.
1. a person or thing that feels.
2. a proposal, remark, hint, etc., designed to bring out the opinions or purposes of others.
3. an organ of touch, as an antenna or a tentacle.
[1520–30]

feel·er

(fē′lər)
A slender body part used for touching or sensing. The antennae of insects and the barbels of catfish are feelers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.feeler - one of a pair of mobile appendages on the head of e.g. insects and crustaceansfeeler - one of a pair of mobile appendages on the head of e.g. insects and crustaceans; typically sensitive to touch and taste
tentacle - any of various elongated tactile or prehensile flexible organs that occur on the head or near the mouth in many animals; used for feeling or grasping or locomotion
2.feeler - a tentative suggestion designed to elicit the reactions of othersfeeler - a tentative suggestion designed to elicit the reactions of others; "she rejected his advances"
proffer, proposition, suggestion - a proposal offered for acceptance or rejection; "it was a suggestion we couldn't refuse"
3.feeler - sensitivity similar to that of a receptor organ; "he had a special antenna for public relations"
sensitiveness, sensitivity - the ability to respond to affective changes in your interpersonal environment
4.feeler - slender tactile process on the jaws of a fishfeeler - slender tactile process on the jaws of a fish
tentacle - any of various elongated tactile or prehensile flexible organs that occur on the head or near the mouth in many animals; used for feeling or grasping or locomotion

feeler

put out feelers make an approach to, probe, test the water, make overtures, make a trial, launch a trial balloon When vacancies occur, the office puts out feelers to the universities.

feeler

noun
Something, as a remark, used to determine the attitude of another:
Translations
لامِس، مِجَس
tykadlo
følehornfølerføletrådprøveballonantenne
tuntosarvi
csáptapogató
fálmari

feeler

[ˈfiːləʳ] N
1. (Zool) [of insect, snail] → antena f
2. (fig) → sondeo m
to put out feelershacer un sondeo

feeler

[ˈfiːlər] n
[insect] → antenne f
(fig) to put out feelers → tâter le terrain
to put out feelers to sb (= contact) → tâter le terrain auprès de qnfeel-good feelgood [ˈfiːlgʊd] adj [film, romance] → qui réchauffe le cœur feel-good factorfeel-good factor noptimisme m

feeler

n
(Zool) → Fühler m; (of sea animal)Tentakel m or nt
(fig)Fühler m; to put out feelersseine Fühler ausstrecken
feelers pl (also feeler gauge)Fühl(er)lehre f

feeler

[ˈfiːləʳ] n (of insect, snail) → antenna; (of octopus) → tentacolo
to put out feelers (fig) → tastare il terreno

feel

(fiːl) past tense, past participle felt (felt) verb
1. to become aware of (something) by the sense of touch. She felt his hand on her shoulder.
2. to find out the shape, size, texture etc of something by touching, usually with the hands. She felt the parcel carefully.
3. to experience or be aware of (an emotion, sensation etc). He felt a sudden anger.
4. to think (oneself) to be. She feels sick; How does she feel about her work?
5. to believe or consider. She feels that the firm treated her badly.
ˈfeeler noun
(in certain animals, insects etc) an organ for touching, especially one of the two thread-like parts on an insect's head.
ˈfeeling noun
1. power and ability to feel. I have no feeling in my little finger.
2. something that one feels physically. a feeling of great pain.
3. (usually in plural) something that one feels in one's mind. His angry words hurt my feelings; a feeling of happiness.
4. an impression or belief. I have a feeling that the work is too hard.
5. affection. He has no feeling for her now.
6. emotion. He spoke with great feeling.
feel as if / as though
to have the sensation (physical or mental) or feeling that. I feel as if I am going to be sick; She feels as though she has known him for years.
feel like
1. to have the feelings that one would have if one were. I feel like a princess in this beautiful dress; He felt like an idiot (= He felt very foolish).
2. to feel that one would like to (have, do etc). I feel like a drink; Do you feel like going to the cinema?
feel one's way
to find one's way by feeling. I had to feel my way to the door in the dark.
get the feel of
to become accustomed to. to get the feel of a new job.
References in classic literature ?
I made it like those Beth invented, a big butterfly with a fat body, and black and yellow wings, worsted feelers, and bead eyes.
The Wax-moth caressed Melissa with her soft feelers and laid another egg.
We told her so; but she only waved her feelers, and said we could all lay eggs like Queens if we chose.
Another, an eyeless drone with no feelers, said that all brood-cells should be perfect circles, so as not to interfere with the grub or the workers.
They had also eight legs and two feelers -- persistent creatures who are called crabs.
The smaller red champion had fastened himself like a vice to his adversary's front, and through all the tumblings on that field never for an instant ceased to gnaw at one of his feelers near the root, having already caused the other to go by the board; while the stronger black one dashed him from side to side, and, as I saw on looking nearer, had already divested him of several of his members.
They struggled half an hour longer under the tumbler, and when I looked again the black soldier had severed the heads of his foes from their bodies, and the still living heads were hanging on either side of him like ghastly trophies at his saddle-bow, still apparently as firmly fastened as ever, and he was endeavoring with feeble struggles, being without feelers and with only the remnant of a leg, and I know not how many other wounds, to divest himself of them; which at length, after half an hour more, he accomplished.
From somewhere or other, the amazing sense which sometimes gives warning of danger to men of adventure, seemed to have opened its feelers.
Otherwise the angles might inflict on the unwary Feeler irreparable injury.
People had not been after them, inasmuch as they had not heard of them; and Cumnor's fruitless feeler would have been a solitary accident.
Modern life stretched out its steam feeler to this point three or four times a day, touched the native existences, and quickly withdrew its feeler again, as if what it touched had been uncongenial.
replied the prince, smiling at the ingenuousness of this little feeler.