fellowship


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fel·low·ship

 (fĕl′ō-shĭp′)
n.
1.
a. The companionship of individuals in a congenial atmosphere and on equal terms: a voracious reader who found fellowship in a book club.
b. Friendship; comradeship: A strong fellowship developed among them.
c. A close association of friends or equals sharing similar interests: a fellowship of photographers.
2.
a. The financial grant made to a fellow in a college or university.
b. The status or position of one who is awarded such a grant.

fellowship

(ˈfɛləʊˌʃɪp)
n
1. the state of sharing mutual interests, experiences, activities, etc
2. a society of people sharing mutual interests, experiences, activities, etc; club
3. companionship; friendship
4. the state or relationship of being a fellow
5. (Ecclesiastical Terms)
a. mutual trust and charitableness between Christians
b. a Church or religious association
6. (Education) education
a. a financed research post providing study facilities, privileges, etc, often in return for teaching services
b. a foundation endowed to support a postgraduate research student
c. an honorary title carrying certain privileges awarded to a postgraduate student
7. (Education) (often capital) the body of fellows in a college, university, etc

fel•low•ship

(ˈfɛl oʊˌʃɪp)

n.
1. the condition or relation of belonging to the same class or group.
2. friendly relationship; companionship; camaraderie: the fellowship among old friends.
3. community of interest, feeling, etc.
4. friendliness.
5. an association of persons having similar interests, occupations, enterprises, etc.
6.
a. the body of fellows in a college or university.
b. the position or stipend of a fellow of a college or university.
c. a foundation for the maintenance of a fellow in a college or university.
[1150–1200]

Fellowship

 a company of equals or friends; a union or association; habitual companions; the crew of a vessel, 1466; members of a corporation or guild; the body of fellows of a college.
Examples: fellowship of the apostles; of friends; of holy men, 1541; of prophets, 1549; of vessels [boats], 1827; of yeomen, 1486.

fellowship

The position of fellow at a college or university, or the money granted to one.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fellowship - an association of people who share common beliefs or activitiesfellowship - an association of people who share common beliefs or activities; "the message was addressed not just to employees but to every member of the company family"; "the church welcomed new members into its fellowship"
association - a formal organization of people or groups of people; "he joined the Modern Language Association"
koinonia - Christian fellowship or communion with God or with fellow Christians; said in particular of the early Christian community
2.fellowship - the state of being with someonefellowship - the state of being with someone; "he missed their company"; "he enjoyed the society of his friends"
freemasonry - a natural or instinctive fellowship between people of similar interests; "he enjoyed the freemasonry of the Press"
friendly relationship, friendship - the state of being friends (or friendly)
3.fellowship - money granted (by a university or foundation or other agency) for advanced study or research
economic aid, financial aid, aid - money to support a worthy person or cause
prize, award - something given for victory or superiority in a contest or competition or for winning a lottery; "the prize was a free trip to Europe"

fellowship

noun
2. camaraderie, intimacy, communion, familiarity, brotherhood, companionship, sociability, amity, kindliness, fraternization, companionability, intercourse a sense of community and fellowship
Quotations
"Fellowship is heaven, and lack of fellowship is hell" [William Morris A Dream of John Ball]

fellowship

noun
1. A pleasant association among people:
2. A group of people united in a relationship and having some interest, activity, or purpose in common:
Translations
صَداقَه، زَمالَه، صُحْبَهمِنْحَه دراسيَّهنادٍ، إتحاد
přátelstvíspolečenstvíspolekstipendiumsvaz
forbundforeningkammeratskabselskabstipendium
félag, félagsskapurvinátta
spolok
arkadaşlıkbilimsel araştırma bursudernek

fellowship

[ˈfeləʊʃɪp] N
1. (= companionship) → compañerismo m
2. (= club, society) → asociación f
3. (Brit) (Univ) (= paid research post) → puesto m de becario (de investigación) (US) (Univ) (= grant) → beca f de investigación

fellowship

[ˈfɛləʊʃɪp] n
(= society) → association f
(= comradeship) → camaraderie f
(UNIVERSITY) (= funding) sorte de bourse universitairefellow traveller n
(= travelling companion) → compagnon de route(compagne)m/f
(= communist sympathizer) → communisant(e) m/ffell-walking [ˈfɛlwɔːkɪŋ] n (British)randonnée f en montagne

fellowship

n
no plKameradschaft f; (= company)Gesellschaft f; (Eccl) → Gemeinschaft f; … who lived without the fellowship of other men…, der keinen Umgang mit anderen Menschen hatte; there’s no sense of fellowship herehier herrscht kein kameradschaftlicher Geist
(Univ: = scholarship) → Forschungsstipendium nt; (= job) Position eines Fellow

fellowship

[ˈfɛləʊˌʃɪp] n (companionship) → compagnia; (club, society) → associazione f (Univ) (research post) → incarico come ricercatore/trice

fellow

(ˈfeləu) noun
1. a man. He's quite a nice fellow but I don't like him.
2. (often as part of a word) a companion and equal. She is playing with her schoolfellows.
3. a member of certain academic societies; a member of the governing body or teaching staff of a college.
adjective
belonging to the same group, country etc. a fellow student; a fellow music-lover.
ˈfellowship noun
1. an association (of people with common interests). a youth fellowship (= a club for young people).
2. friendliness.
3. a scholarship given to a graduate student for advanced studies or for research.
ˌfellow-ˈfeeling noun
sympathy (especially for someone in a similar situation, of similar tastes etc). I had a fellow-feeling for the other patient with the broken leg.
References in classic literature ?
The moments glided on, while a feeling of good fellowship passed around the circle like a mystic cord, holding and binding these people together with jest and laughter.
After my fellowship of toil and impracticable schemes with the dreamy brethren of Brook Farm; after living for three years within the subtle influence of an intellect like Emerson's; after those wild, free days on the Assabeth, indulging fantastic speculations, beside our fire of fallen boughs, with Ellery Channing; after talking with Thoreau about pine-trees and Indian relics in his hermitage at Walden; after growing fastidious by sympathy with the classic refinement of Hillard's culture; after becoming imbued with poetic sentiment at Longfellow's hearthstone -- it was time, at length, that I should exercise other faculties of my nature, and nourish myself with food for which I had hitherto had little appetite.
I gave him a friendly greeting by way of good fellowship, but did not ask him any questions.
Behold, then, the candles lighted, the fire stimulated to the burning point in the grate, and our three worthies seated round a table, well spread with all the accessories to good fellowship enumerated before.
I conclude these remarks by copying the following portrait of the religion of the south, (which is, by communion and fellowship, the religion of the north,) which I soberly affirm is "true to the life," and without caricature or the slightest exaggeration.
He is reformed in every respect, apparently: quite a Christian: offering the right hand of fellowship to his enemies all around
If my family are at length sensible of the deprivation to which their own conduct has, in the past, exposed them, and now desire to extend the hand of fellowship, let it not be repulsed.
His life, before he came to Raveloe, had been filled with the movement, the mental activity, and the close fellowship, which, in that day as in this, marked the life of an artisan early incorporated in a narrow religious sect, where the poorest layman has the chance of distinguishing himself by gifts of speech, and has, at the very least, the weight of a silent voter in the government of his community.
Take him now and bury him, for I weary of his fellowship.
Which must be mutual, in proportion due Giv'n and receiv'd; but in disparitie The one intense, the other still remiss Cannot well suite with either, but soon prove Tedious alike: Of fellowship I speak Such as I seek, fit to participate All rational delight, wherein the brute Cannot be human consort; they rejoyce Each with thir kinde, Lion with Lioness; So fitly them in pairs thou hast combin'd; Much less can Bird with Beast, or Fish with Fowle So well converse, nor with the Ox the Ape; Wors then can Man with Beast, and least of all.
No the infidel Templar the licentious De Bracy Ulrica, the foul murdering strumpet the men who aided my enterprises the dog Saxons and accursed Jews, who are my prisoners all, all shall attend me a goodly fellowship as ever took the downward road Ha, ha, ha
At the college there had been good fellowship, fun, rules, and duties which were a source of strength when observed and a source of delicious excitement when violated, freedom from ceremony, toffee making, flights on the banisters, and appreciative audiences for the soldier in the chimney.

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