felony


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

fel·o·ny

 (fĕl′ə-nē)
n. pl. fel·o·nies Law
1. One of several serious crimes, such as murder, rape, or robbery, punishable by a more stringent sentence than that given for a misdemeanor.
2. Any of several crimes in early English law that were punishable by forfeiture of land or goods and by capital or other serious punishment.

felony

(ˈfɛlənɪ)
n, pl -nies
(Law) (formerly) a serious crime, such as murder or arson. All distinctions between felony and misdemeanour were abolished in England and Wales in 1967

fel•o•ny

(ˈfɛl ə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
1. an offense of graver character than a misdemeanor and usu. punished by imprisonment for more than one year.
2. Early Eng. Law. any crime punishable by death or mutilation and forfeiture of goods.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French]

felony

A serious crime, such as murder or rape. Compare misdemeanor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.felony - a serious crime (such as murder or arson)
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
seizure, capture - the act of taking of a person by force
racketeering - engaging in a racket
bribery, graft - the practice of offering something (usually money) in order to gain an illicit advantage
larceny, stealing, theft, thievery, thieving - the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International"
extortion - the felonious act of extorting money (as by threats of violence)
burglary - entering a building unlawfully with intent to commit a felony or to steal valuable property

felony

noun crime, offence, misdemeanour, transgression, job (informal), wrong, fault, outrage, atrocity, violation, trespass, misdeed, unlawful act, malfeasance He pleaded guilty to six felonies.

felony

noun
Law. A serious breaking of the public law:
Translations
جِنايَه، جَريمَه كُبْرى
težký zločin
forbrydelse
fõbenjáró bûn
glæpur
ağır suç

felony

[ˈfelənɪ] N (Jur) → crimen m, delito m grave

felony

[ˈfɛləni] ncrime m, forfait m

felony

n(schweres) Verbrechen

felony

[ˈfɛlənɪ] n (Law) → reato, crimine m

felon

(ˈfelən) noun
a person who is guilty of a serious crime.
ˈfelonyplural ˈfelonies noun
a serious crime. He committed a felony.
References in classic literature ?
Felony is a term of loose signification, even in the common law of England; and of various import in the statute law of that kingdom.
They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in any other Place.
I do further admit that I did, deliberately and shamelessly, compound my wife's felony.
but all would not do, they were over-ruled by the rest; the two wenches swore home to the fact, and the jury found the bill against me for robbery and house-breaking, that is, for felony and burglary.
And by two other Acts of the same reign such a celebration of marriage is made a felony on the part of the priest.
Seein' you believe what you believe, then you'd be for compoundin' the felony," Daughtry retorted, the habitual obstinate tightening of his brows showing which way his will set.
These two brothers had been brought up together in a school at Exeter; and, being accustomed to go home once a week, had often heard, from their mother's lips, long accounts of their father's sufferings in his days of poverty, and of their deceased uncle's importance in his days of affluence: which recitals produced a very different impression on the two: for, while the younger, who was of a timid and retiring disposition, gleaned from thence nothing but forewarnings to shun the great world and attach himself to the quiet routine of a country life, Ralph, the elder, deduced from the often- repeated tale the two great morals that riches are the only true source of happiness and power, and that it is lawful and just to compass their acquisition by all means short of felony.
In matters of high importance, particularly in cases relating to the game, the justice was not always attentive to these admonitions of his clerk; for, indeed, in executing the laws under that head, many justices of peace suppose they have a large discretionary power, by virtue of which, under the notion of searching for and taking away engines for the destruction of the game, they often commit trespasses, and sometimes felony, at their pleasure.
Do you know,' said I, as we walked along the passage, 'what felony was Number Twenty Seven's last "folly"?
Jaggers made not me alone intensely melancholy, because, after he was gone, Herbert said of himself, with his eyes fixed on the fire, that he thought he must have committed a felony and forgotten the details of it, he felt so dejected and guilty.
We'll indict the blackguards for felony, and get 'em shipped off to penal settlements.
They laughed, and talked of his success in doing this; and Monks, talking on about the boy, and getting very wild, said that though he had got the young devil's money safely know, he'd rather have had it the other way; for, what a game it would have been to have brought down the boast of the father's will, by driving him through every jail in town, and then hauling him up for some capital felony which Fagin could easily manage, after having made a good profit of him besides.