female suffrage

female suffrage

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) chiefly US another name for women's suffrage
References in periodicals archive ?
Meryl Streep plays Emmeline Pankhurst, who, after years of fruitless peaceful campaigning for female suffrage, founded the Women's Social and Political Union in 1903, an organisation dedicated to "deeds, not words".
AS I watch the Labour Party conference on my TV there are many tributes to Keir Hardie, the Labour Party's first leader who died 100 years ago, and as delegates argue for women to play a more active role we should remember that Hardie was a supporter of female suffrage, not just to vote, but to become active in politics and members of parliament.
Who, in 1903, created the Women's Social and Political Union to fight for female suffrage in Great Britain?
There's an enjoyable historical skit on the all-male politicos holding back the forces of female suffrage, a knowing discussion on the ruling classes where the protagonists try to differentiate between the 'posh fella' and the 'dead Posh fella', and a Pythonesque world door-knocking championships.
Even after 1920, when female suffrage became the law of the land, Massachusetts women did relatively poorly as candidates for public office.
One of the most vividly described histories in this collection is Susan Magarey's account of two crucial moments in the history of women's progress towards full citizenship: the achievement of female suffrage in 1894 and the prohibition of discrimination against women on the grounds of their sex in 1975.
Eliza," she says, "was a woman far ahead of her time" who possessed "strong values of right and wrong"; an "idealistic pioneer woman" who campaigned for abolition and female suffrage while defying convention to shed two husbands prior to marrying, in 1865, the also twice-married Luther, a man to whom she was drawn, in part, by their shared embrace of Spiritualism.
The struggle for female suffrage in Europe; voting to become citizens.
After educated women in America helped fight for the abolition of slavery, they put female suffrage on the agenda.
The banner was carried by female suffrage campaigner Dr Ethel Williams, on "votes for women" demonstrations in Newcastle and London between 1908 and 1914.