fermentation


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Related to fermentation: Alcoholic fermentation, Lactic acid fermentation

fer·men·ta·tion

 (fûr′mən-tā′shən, -mĕn-)
n.
1. Any of a group of chemical reactions induced by microorganisms or enzymes that split complex organic compounds into relatively simple substances, especially the anaerobic conversion of sugar to carbon dioxide and alcohol by yeast.
2. Unrest; agitation.

fermentation

(ˌfɜːmɛnˈteɪʃən)
n
(Biochemistry) a chemical reaction in which a ferment causes an organic molecule to split into simpler substances, esp the anaerobic conversion of sugar to ethyl alcohol by yeast. Also called: ferment
ferˈmentative adj
ferˈmentatively adv
ferˈmentativeness n

fer•men•ta•tion

(ˌfɜr mɛnˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or process of fermenting.
2. a chemical change brought about by a ferment, as the conversion of grape sugar into ethyl alcohol by yeast enzymes.
3. agitation; excitement.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin]

fer·men·ta·tion

(fûr′mĕn-tā′shən)
The process by which complex organic compounds, such as glucose, are broken down by the action of enzymes into simpler compounds when no oxygen is present. Fermentation, which results in the production of energy, occurs in the cells of the body, especially muscle cells, and in plants and some bacteria. Yeasts can convert sugars to alcohol and carbon dioxide by fermentation.

Fermentation

See also alcohol; beer; wine.

the branch of biochemistry that studies enzym es. Also called zymology.enzymologist, n.
zymology.
the process in which a zymogen becomes an enzyme, as in the fermentation process. — zymogenic, zymogenous, adj.
the branch of biochemistry that studies fermentation. Also called zymetology.
1. the fermentative action of enzymes.
2. fermentation and its resulting changes. — zymolytic, adj.
a device for determining degrees of fermentation.
fermentation. See also disease and illness. — zymotic adj.
the application of the principles of fermentation. Also zymotechny. — zymotechnic, adj.
1. caused by or causing fermentation.
2. causing or referring to infectious diseases.
a branch of applied chemistry that studies fermentation processes, as in brewing.

fermentation

The breakdown of carbohydrates by anaerobic respiration.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fermentation - a state of agitation or turbulent change or developmentfermentation - a state of agitation or turbulent change or development; "the political ferment produced new leadership"; "social unrest"
Sturm und Drang, upheaval, turbulence - a state of violent disturbance and disorder (as in politics or social conditions generally); "the industrial revolution was a period of great turbulence"
2.fermentation - a process in which an agent causes an organic substance to break down into simpler substancesfermentation - a process in which an agent causes an organic substance to break down into simpler substances; especially, the anaerobic breakdown of sugar into alcohol
bottom fermentation - a slow kind of alcoholic fermentation at a temperature low enough that the yeast cells can sink to the bottom of the fermenting liquid; used in the production of lager
chemical action, chemical change, chemical process - (chemistry) any process determined by the atomic and molecular composition and structure of the substances involved
top fermentation - a violent kind of alcoholic fermentation at a temperature high enough to carry the yeast cells to the top of the fermenting liquid; used in the production of ale; "top fermentation uses a yeast that ferments at higher temperatures than that used for bottom fermentation"
vinification - the process whereby fermentation changes grape juice into wine

fermentation

noun
Related words
adjective zymotic
Translations
تَخَمُّر، إخْتِمار
kvašení
gæringfermentering
erjedés
gerjun
vrenje
fermenteringjäsning
mayala ma

fermentation

[ˌfɜːmenˈteɪʃən] Nfermentación f

fermentation

[ˌfɜːrmɛnˈteɪʃən] nfermentation f

fermentation

n
Gärung f; (fig, of plan etc) → Ausreifen nt
(fig, = excitement) → Aufregung f, → Unruhe f

fermentation

[ˌfɜːmɛnˈteɪʃn] nfermentazione f

ferment

(fəˈment) verb
1. to (make something) go through a particular chemical change (as when yeast is added to dough in the making of bread). Grape juice must be fermented before it becomes wine.
2. to excite or be excited. He is the kind of person to ferment trouble.
(ˈfəːment) noun
a state of excitement. The whole city was in a ferment.
ˌfermenˈtation (fəːmen-) noun
the chemical change occurring when something ferments or is fermented.

fer·men·ta·tion

n. fermentación, descomposición de sustancias complejas por la acción de enzimas o fermentos.
References in classic literature ?
Du Bousquier rubbed his cotton night-cap to the top of his head with a rotatory motion, which plainly indicated the tremendous fermentation of his ideas.
Passepartout wandered for several hours in the midst of this motley crowd, looking in at the windows of the rich and curious shops, the jewellery establishments glittering with quaint Japanese ornaments, the restaurants decked with streamers and banners, the tea-houses, where the odorous beverage was being drunk with saki, a liquor concocted from the fermentation of rice, and the comfortable smoking-houses, where they were puffing, not opium, which is almost unknown in Japan, but a very fine, stringy tobacco.
Decaying vegetation may occasionally smoulder with the heat of its fermentation, but this rarely results in flame.
He bought the spoiled acreage of his neighbors, which he cut up for the silo--as yet the only one in the county--adding water to help fermentation.
It was in vain urged by the housewife that God made yeast, as well as dough, and loves fermentation just as dearly as he loves vegetation; that fermentation develops the saccharine element in the grain, and makes it more palatable and more digestible.
No step of the progressive fermentation which had shown itself at the report of his arrest escaped him.
What is wished for just now is the accentuation of the unrest - of the fermentation which undoubtedly exists - "
As part of its ongoing expansion strategy in nutrition and health, Lesaffre, a global company in the field of yeast and fermentation, has obtained a majority participation in Gnosis, an Italian company specializing in the development, production and sale of fermentation ingredients for the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, cosmetic and veterinary industries.
It contains a material, called lignin, which is so tough it resists the action of fermentation microbes used to convert plant matter to ethanol.
Mutation of the pstG gene results in increased production of succinate in fermentation of glucose by Escherichia coli.
After fermentation, the beer is stored at cold temperatures for periods ranging from a few days for an ale to a few weeks for a lager, Finally, the beer is filtered, further carbonated, and packaged.
This lineup is a clear indication of our competitive edge in fermentation technologies.