fervent


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fer·vent

 (fûr′vənt)
adj.
1. Having or showing great emotion or zeal; ardent: fervent protests; a fervent admirer.
2. Extremely hot; glowing.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin fervēns, fervent-, present participle of fervēre, to boil; see bhreu- in Indo-European roots.]

fer′vent·ly adv.
fer′vent·ness n.

fervent

(ˈfɜːvənt) or

fervid

adj
1. intensely passionate; ardent: a fervent desire to change society.
2. archaic or poetic boiling, burning, or glowing: fervent heat.
[C14: from Latin fervēre to boil, glow]
ˈfervently, ˈfervidly adv
ˈferventness, ˈfervidness n

fer•vent

(ˈfɜr vənt)

adj.
1. having or showing very warm or intense spirit, feeling, enthusiasm, etc.; ardent; passionate: a fervent admirer; a fervent plea.
2. burning.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin to boil]
fer′vent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fervent - characterized by intense emotion; "ardent love"; "an ardent lover"; "a fervent desire to change society"; "a fervent admirer"; "fiery oratory"; "an impassioned appeal"; "a torrid love affair"
passionate - having or expressing strong emotions
2.fervent - extremely hot; "the fervent heat...merely communicated a genial warmth to their half-torpid systems"- Nathaniel Hawthorne; "set out...when the fervid heat subsides"- Frances Trollope
hot - used of physical heat; having a high or higher than desirable temperature or giving off heat or feeling or causing a sensation of heat or burning; "hot stove"; "hot water"; "a hot August day"; "a hot stuffy room"; "she's hot and tired"; "a hot forehead"

fervent

adjective ardent, earnest, enthusiastic, fervid, passionate, warm, excited, emotional, intense, flaming, eager, animated, fiery, ecstatic, devout, heartfelt, impassioned, zealous, vehement, perfervid (literary) a fervent admirer of her work
cold, cool, detached, apathetic, frigid, dispassionate, impassive, unfeeling, unimpassioned
Usage: Care should be taken when using fervid as an alternative to fervent. Although both come from the same root and share the meaning `intense, ardent', the first has largely positive connotations, and is associated with hopes, wishes, and beliefs or admirers, supporters, and fans. The second, apart from being used less often than the first, is chiefly negative: in the fervid politics of New York city. A fervent kiss from an admirer would probably be welcome; a fervid one would not.

fervent

adjective
2. Showing or having enthusiasm:
Informal: crazy.
Slang: gung ho, nuts.
Translations
vroucížhavý
glødendelidenskabelig
innilegur, einlægur
iš visos širdies
dedzīgskvēls
ateşli

fervent

[ˈfɜːvənt] ADJ [prayer] → ferviente; [desire] → ardiente; [belief] → firme; [supporter] → acérrimo, ferviente; [denial] → enfático
he is a fervent believer in neoliberalismes un acérrimo or ferviente partidario del neoliberalismo
it is my fervent hope thatespero fervientemente que ...

fervent

[ˈfɜːrvənt] adj [admirer] → fervent(e), ardent(e); [hope] → ardent(e)

fervent

adj supporter, belief, advocate, nationalist, socialistleidenschaftlich; admirerglühend; hope, prayer, wish, desireinbrünstig (geh); she is a fervent believer in free tradesie glaubt leidenschaftlich an den freien Handel

fervent

[ˈfɜːvnt] fervid [ˈfɜːvɪd] adj (believer, supporter) → fervente; (desire) → ardente, fervido/a

fervent

(ˈfəːvənt) adjective
enthusiastic and very sincere. fervent hope.
ˈfervently adverb
References in classic literature ?
The clocks were striking midnight and the rooms were very still as a figure glided quietly from bed to bed, smoothing a coverlet here, settling a pillow there, and pausing to look long and tenderly at each unconscious face, to kiss each with lips that mutely blessed, and to pray the fervent prayers which only mothers utter.
Their thanksgivings were deep and silent; the offerings of their gentle spirits burning brightest and purest on the secret altars of their hearts; and their renovated and more earthly feelings exhibiting themselves in long and fervent though speechless caresses.
In his last extremity, the expiring breath stealing faintly through Clifford's lips, he would doubtless press Hepzibah's hand, in fervent recognition of all her lavished love, and close his eyes, --but not so much to die, as to be constrained to look no longer on her face
It was pleasant in the summer forenoons -- when the fervent heat, that almost liquefied the rest of the human family, merely communicated a genial warmth to their half torpid systems -- it was pleasant to hear them chatting in the back entry, a row of them all tipped against the wall, as usual; while the frozen witticisms of past generations were thawed out, and came bubbling with laughter from their lips.
Further on, from the bright red windows of the Sword-Fish Inn, there came such fervent rays, that it seemed to have melted the packed snow and ice from before the house, for everywhere else the congealed frost lay ten inches thick in a hard, asphaltic pavement, --rather weary for me, when I struck my foot against the flinty projections, because from hard, remorseless service the soles of my boots were in a most miserable plight.
Sam's vein of piety was always uncommonly fervent in his mistress' presence; and he made great capital of scriptural figures and images.
Her's, for me, was, I believe, fervent as the attachment of your sister to Mr.
Could you tell her so for me, with my fervent acknowledgments?
And it is not so much the embrace she gave me, that lives in my mind, though it was as fervent as could be, as what followed the embrace.
I consented, and he was fervent, and then sat down again.
A less truthful man than he might have been tempted into the subsequent creation of a vision in the form of resurgent memory; a less sane man might have believed in such a creation; but Silas was both sane and honest, though, as with many honest and fervent men, culture had not defined any channels for his sense of mystery, and so it spread itself over the proper pathway of inquiry and knowledge.
So spake the fervent Angel, but his zeale None seconded, as out of season judg'd, Or singular and rash, whereat rejoic'd Th' Apostat, and more haughty thus repli'd.