fetter


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fet·ter

 (fĕt′ər)
n.
1. A device, usually one of a pair of rings connected to a chain, that is attached to the ankles or feet to restrict movement.
2. often fetters Something that serves to restrict; a restraint: the fetters of tyranny.
tr.v. fet·tered, fet·ter·ing, fet·ters
1. To put fetters on; shackle.
2. To restrict or restrain: thinking that is fettered by prejudice. See Synonyms at hobble.

[Middle English feter, from Old English; see ped- in Indo-European roots.]

fetter

(ˈfɛtə)
n
1. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) (often plural) a chain or bond fastened round the ankle; shackle
2. (usually plural) a check or restraint: the fetters of social convention.
vb (tr)
3. to restrict or confine
4. to bind in fetters
[Old English fetor; related to Old Norse fjöturr fetter, Old High German fezzera, Latin pedica fetter, impedīre to hinder]
ˈfetterer n
ˈfetterless adj

fet•ter

(ˈfɛt ər)

n.
1. a chain or shackle placed on the feet.
2. Usu., fetters. anything that confines or restrains.
v.t.
3. to put fetters upon.
4. to confine; restrain.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English feter; c. Old High German fezzera, Old Norse fjǫturr; akin to foot]
fet′ter•er, n.

fetter


Past participle: fettered
Gerund: fettering

Imperative
fetter
fetter
Present
I fetter
you fetter
he/she/it fetters
we fetter
you fetter
they fetter
Preterite
I fettered
you fettered
he/she/it fettered
we fettered
you fettered
they fettered
Present Continuous
I am fettering
you are fettering
he/she/it is fettering
we are fettering
you are fettering
they are fettering
Present Perfect
I have fettered
you have fettered
he/she/it has fettered
we have fettered
you have fettered
they have fettered
Past Continuous
I was fettering
you were fettering
he/she/it was fettering
we were fettering
you were fettering
they were fettering
Past Perfect
I had fettered
you had fettered
he/she/it had fettered
we had fettered
you had fettered
they had fettered
Future
I will fetter
you will fetter
he/she/it will fetter
we will fetter
you will fetter
they will fetter
Future Perfect
I will have fettered
you will have fettered
he/she/it will have fettered
we will have fettered
you will have fettered
they will have fettered
Future Continuous
I will be fettering
you will be fettering
he/she/it will be fettering
we will be fettering
you will be fettering
they will be fettering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been fettering
you have been fettering
he/she/it has been fettering
we have been fettering
you have been fettering
they have been fettering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been fettering
you will have been fettering
he/she/it will have been fettering
we will have been fettering
you will have been fettering
they will have been fettering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been fettering
you had been fettering
he/she/it had been fettering
we had been fettering
you had been fettering
they had been fettering
Conditional
I would fetter
you would fetter
he/she/it would fetter
we would fetter
you would fetter
they would fetter
Past Conditional
I would have fettered
you would have fettered
he/she/it would have fettered
we would have fettered
you would have fettered
they would have fettered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fetter - a shackle for the ankles or feetfetter - a shackle for the ankles or feet  
hamper, shackle, trammel, bond - a restraint that confines or restricts freedom (especially something used to tie down or restrain a prisoner)
Verb1.fetter - restrain with fetters
handcuff, manacle, cuff - confine or restrain with or as if with manacles or handcuffs; "The police handcuffed the suspect at the scene of the crime"
restrain, confine, hold - to close within bounds, limit or hold back from movement; "This holds the local until the express passengers change trains"; "About a dozen animals were held inside the stockade"; "The illegal immigrants were held at a detention center"; "The terrorists held the journalists for ransom"

fetter

verb
1. restrict, bind, confine, curb, restrain, hamstring, hamper, encumber, clip someone's wings, trammel, straiten He would not be fettered by bureaucracy.
2. chain, tie, tie up, shackle, hobble, hold captive, manacle, gyve (archaic), put a straitjacket on My foes fettered me hand and foot.
plural noun
1. restraints, checks, curbs, constraints, captivity, obstructions, bondage, hindrances without the fetters of restrictive rules
2. chains, bonds, irons, shackles, manacles, leg irons, gyves (archaic), bilboes He saw a boy in fetters in the dungeon.

fetter

noun
Something that physically confines the legs or arms:
bond, chain (used in plural), handcuff (often used in plural), hobble, iron (used in plural), manacle, restraint, shackle.
Archaic: gyve.
verb
To restrict the activity or free movement of:
Informal: hog-tie.
Translations
قُيود، أغْلاليُقَيِّد، يُكَبِّل
poutopřipoutatřetězsvázat
bindelænke
FesselfesselnFußschellen
kahleet
lábbilincsláncbéklyóbéklyózbilincs
fjötra, hlekkjahlekkir, fótajárn
pančiotipantis
iekalt važāspineklissapītvalgivažas
ayak zinciriprangazincire vurmak

fetter

[ˈfetəʳ] VT [+ person] → encadenar, poner grilletes a; [+ horse] → trabar (fig) → poner trabas a

fetter

[ˈfɛtər] vt (= hamper) → entraver

fetter

vt prisonerfesseln; goatanpflocken; (fig)in Fesseln legen
n fetters pl(Fuß)fesseln pl; (fig)Fesseln pl; to put a prisoner in fetterseinen Gefangenen in Fesseln legen

fetter

[ˈfɛtəʳ] vt (person) → incatenare (fig) → ostacolare

fetter

(ˈfetə) noun
a chain that holds the foot or feet of a prisoner, animal etc to prevent running away. The prisoner was in fetters.
verb
to fasten with a fetter. She fettered the horse.
References in classic literature ?
And now a dream of resistance haunts him, hope battling with fear; until suddenly he stirs, and a fetter snaps--and a thrill shoots through him, to the farthest ends of his huge body, and in a flash the dream becomes an act
No way but to fetter 'em; got legs,--they'll use 'em,--no mistake.
But where is the use of going on," I asked, "when you are probably preparing some iron blow of contradiction, or forging a fresh chain to fetter your heart?
The last I saw of him, his head was bent over his knee and he was working hard at his fetter, muttering impatient imprecations at it and at his leg.
We will go to Palestine, where Conrade, Marquis of Montserrat, is my friend a friend free as myself from the doting scruples which fetter our free-born reason rather with Saladin will we league ourselves, than endure the scorn of the bigots whom we contemn.
I removed from the Old Jewry to Fetter Lane, and from thence to Wapping, hoping to get business among the sailors; but it would not turn to account.
No qualification of wealth, of birth, of religious faith, or of civil profession is permitted to fetter the judgement or disappoint the inclination of the people.
You know a distribution of labor is the source of all civilization--that trade is an exchange of equivalents--that custom-houses fetter these equivalents--that nothing which is fettered is free--"
are thirty-five years to his full strength, and through thirty-five Rains the ringed elephant befriended the younger, and all the while the fetter ate into the flesh.
All do not, like the fabled phoenix, warble sweet melodies in their agony; sometimes they spit venom--venom you must breathe whether you will or no, for you cannot seal their mouths, though you may fetter their limbs.
It was more than a chain, more than a fetter, more than a ring of iron, it was a living pair of pincers endowed with intelligence, which emerged from the wall.
He felt it as a fetter, an encumbrance, something which made them both, but him in particular, ridiculous.