feuilleton

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Related to feuilletonistic: Roman feuilleton

feuil·le·ton

 (fœ′yə-tôN′)
n.
1.
a. The part of a European newspaper devoted to light fiction, reviews, and articles of general entertainment.
b. An article appearing in such a section.
2.
a. A novel published in installments.
b. A light, popular work of fiction.
3. A short literary essay or sketch.

[French, from feuillet, sheet of paper, little leaf, diminutive of feuille, leaf, from Old French foille, from Latin folium; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

feuil′le·ton′ism (-tôn′ĭz′əm, -tôN′nĭz′-) n.
feuil′le·ton′ist n.

feuilleton

(ˈfʊɪˌtɒn; French fœjtɔ̃)
n
1. (Journalism & Publishing) the part of a European newspaper carrying reviews, serialized fiction, etc
2. (Journalism & Publishing) such a review or article
[C19: from French, from feuillet sheet of paper, diminutive of feuille leaf, from Latin folium]
ˈfeuilletonism n
ˈfeuilletonist n
ˌfeuilletonˈistic adj

feuil•le•ton

(ˈfɔɪ ɪ tn; Fr. fœyəˈtɔ̃)

n., pl. -tons (-tnz; Fr. -ˈtɔ̃)
1. a part of a European newspaper devoted to light literature, fiction, criticism, etc.
2. an item printed in the feuilleton.
[1835–45; < French]
feuil′le•ton•ism, n.
feuil′le•ton•ist, n.
feuil`le•ton•is′tic, adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like a lot of shows today, this one seemed to be inviting a questioning of art's purpose at a time when its objects often serve as props for a feuilletonistic moral drama that purports, via the medium of the exhibition, that the display of a known problem is sufficient unto itself; in many such cases, an ethical gray area simply adds frisson.
In limiting her discussion of Austrian women's artist leagues to the prewar period, Johnson focuses on feuilletonistic reactions to the 1910 "Art of the Woman" show, implying that the leagues ran out of creative gas after World War I.
10) To be sure, in "Heine and the Consequences" Kraus does seem to be making a critical statement about German Jews and the feuilletonistic writing that Heine helped forge.
She is a keen observer, and the result is feuilletonistic criticism of the highest degree; one can hardly fault her for including it here.