fey

(redirected from feyer)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

fey

 (fā)
adj.
1.
a. Overrefined, exaggerated, or affected: "She said the word in a deliberately fey and pretentious manner, striking a pose" (Jenefer Shute).
b. Effeminate: "a fey snap of the wrist" (Michael Eric Dyson).
2.
a. Having or displaying an otherworldly, magical, or fairylike aspect or quality: "She's got that fey look as though she's had breakfast with a leprechaun" (Dorothy Burnham).
b. Having visionary power; clairvoyant.
c. Appearing touched or crazy, as if under a spell.
3. Scots
a. Fated to die soon.
b. Full of the sense of approaching death.

[Middle English feie, fated to die, from Old English fǣge.]

fey′ly adv.

fey

(feɪ)
adj
1. interested in or believing in the supernatural
2. attuned to the supernatural; clairvoyant; visionary
3. chiefly Scot fated to die; doomed
4. chiefly Scot in a state of high spirits or unusual excitement, formerly believed to presage death
[Old English fæge marked out for death; related to Old Norse feigr doomed, Old High German feigi]
ˈfeyness n

fey

(feɪ)

adj.
1. whimsical; strange: a fey manner.
2. supernatural; enchanted: elves and other fey creatures.
3. appearing to be under a spell; visionary.
4. Chiefly Scot. doomed.
5. being in an unnaturally excited state of mind, once thought to portend death.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English fǣge doomed to die; c. Old Saxon fēgi, Old High German feigi, Old Norse feigr]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fey - slightly insanefey - slightly insane      
insane - afflicted with or characteristic of mental derangement; "was declared insane"; "insane laughter"
2.fey - suggestive of an elf in strangeness and otherworldliness; "thunderbolts quivered with elfin flares of heat lightning"; "the fey quality was there, the ability to see the moon at midday"- John Mason Brown
supernatural - not existing in nature or subject to explanation according to natural laws; not physical or material; "supernatural forces and occurrences and beings"

fey

adjective
Having, brought about by, or relating to supernatural powers or magic:
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Gombosi's catalogue contains forty-five works, but another work has since been discovered and identified: Die Feyer der Christen auf Golgatha (1786), by Johann Gottfried Schicht (1753-1823), conductor of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra and cantor of the Thomanerchor.
Notably, Feyer, Sacerdote, and Stern (2007) and Blanchard and Katz (1992).
A high-profile item about this was part of the New York Times Insider" piece When Readers Write Back, on p2A March 28: "Since the election, and since the inauguration, the numbers have gone up significantly," said Thomas Feyer, the Times' lead letters editor]
Williamson & Anne-Marie Feyer, Moderate Sleep Deprivation Produces Impairments in Cognitive and Motor Performance Equivalent to Legally Prescribed Levels of Alcohol Intoxication, 57 OCCUPATIONAL & Envtl.
Firth H, Herbison P, Mcbride D, Feyer A, 2002, Low back pain among farmers in southland, NZ.
Thomas Feyer, who edits the Letters to the Editor section of the New York Times, wrote about receiving this query from a sardonic reader when he suggested that letters should be limited to 150 words, or as brief as Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.
or dowel dale dell deal dill dial doll dole dull duel fowl fail fell feel fill file fall foal full fuel or fool fair feyer (more fey) ferfear fir fire for four fur fewer had haid (head, dialect) head heed hid hide hod hoed hud hued mad maid med mead mid mide (Web3) mod mode mud mood pack paik (Web3) peck peek pick pike pock poke puck puke rad raid red reed rid ride rod road rudd rude.
The results of the present study provide clear evidence of the importance of personality factor in predicting academic performance lending support to previous findings by Feyer et al.
Napping on night shift is a strategy used in environments outside of health care to assist workers to cope with shiftwork and improve work performance (Purnell, Feyer, & Herbison, 2002; Signal, Gander, Anderson, & Brash, 2009; Takeyama, Kubo, & Itani, 2005).