fibular

(redirected from fibular nerve)
Also found in: Medical.
Related to fibular nerve: tibial nerve, Peroneal nerve
Translations

fib·u·lar

a. fibular, rel. al peroné;
___ arteryarteria ___;
___ veinsvenas ___.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its branches to both heads of the gastrocnemius and the posterior soleus muscle were suggested to be used as donors, to restore the function of the deep fibular nerve in cases of high sciatic nerve injury (Flores, 2009).
The smaller fibular nerve supplies the craniolateral crus and pes musculature, which are vital to tarsal flexion and digital extension while the larger tibial nerve innervates the extensors of the tarsus and digital flexors.
Specifically, there are five signs and symptoms that can be noted before a hands-on examination is performed, including mechanism of injury, location of pain, involvement of the common fibular nerve, complaints of knee instability, and abnormal gait.
However, the motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) of bilateral tibial nerves and left common peroneal nerve, and the sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV) of right sural nerve and superficial fibular nerve were all slow, with normal amplitude.
However, the fabella may also be involved in or affected by several pathological conditions, including osteoarthritis of the knee involving the fabella, isolated fabellofemoral osteoarthritis, fabella syndrome, common fibular nerve impingement, fabella dislocation, and fractures [5].
Common fibular nerve (formerly known as common peroneal nerve) entrapment at the fibular head is the most common entrapment neuropathy in the lower extremities.
It's usually unilateral and associated with fibular nerve palsy due to fibular head mechanical compression (2).
The lateral sural cutaneous (LSC) and sural communicating branch nerves also originate from the common fibular nerve and have a sensory function that can elicit reflex activity.
Surgical anatomy of the sural and superficial fibular nerve whit an emphasis on the approach to the lateral malleolus.
There is however a body of literature reporting on manual therapy for the treatment of a number of peripheral nerve entrapments including cubital tunnel syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, thoracic outlet syndrome, superficial fibular nerve entrapment and femoral nerve entrapment.