fiction

(redirected from fictionists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

fic·tion

 (fĭk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The category of literature, drama, film, or other creative work whose content is imagined and is not necessarily based on fact.
b. Works in this category: the fiction of Virginia Woolf.
c. A work within this category: the shorter fictions of Faulkner.
2.
a. Narrative, explanatory material, or belief that is not true or has been imagined or fabricated: The notion that he was at the scene of the crime is pure fiction.
b. A narrative, explanation, or belief that may seem true but is false or fabricated: "Neutrality is a fiction in an unneutral world" (Howard Zinn).
3. Law A verbal contrivance that is in some sense inaccurate but that accomplishes a purpose, as in the treatment of husband and wife as one person or a corporation as an entity.

[Middle English ficcioun, from Old French fiction, from Latin fictiō, fictiōn-, from fictus, past participle of fingere, to form; see dheigh- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

fic′tion·al adj.
fic′tion·al′i·ty (-shə-năl′ĭ-tē) n.
fic′tion·al·ly adv.

fiction

(ˈfɪkʃən)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) literary works invented by the imagination, such as novels or short stories
2. an invented story or explanation; lie
3. the act of inventing a story or explanation
4. (Law) law something assumed to be true for the sake of convenience, though probably false
[C14: from Latin fictiō a fashioning, hence something imaginary, from fingere to shape]
ˈfictional adj
ˈfictionally adv
ˌfictionˈeer, ˈfictionist n

fic•tion

(ˈfɪk ʃən)

n.
1. the class of literature comprising works of imaginative narration, esp. in prose form.
2. works of this class, as novels or short stories.
3. something feigned, invented, or imagined, esp. a made-up story.
4. the act of feigning, inventing, or imagining.
5. an assumption that a fact exists, regardless of the truth of the matter, so that a legal principle can be applied on the basis of the existing facts.
[1375–1425; < Latin fictiō action of shaping, feigning, fiction, derivative of fingere to shape]
fic′tion•al, adj.
fic′tion•al•ly, adv.

fiction

Literature, especially stories, based on invented character and incidents—though fiction may often be set against a background of real events and draw on real-life experience.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fiction - a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on factfiction - a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact
literary composition, literary work - imaginative or creative writing
dystopia - a work of fiction describing an imaginary place where life is extremely bad because of deprivation or oppression or terror
novel - an extended fictional work in prose; usually in the form of a story
fantasy, phantasy - fiction with a large amount of imagination in it; "she made a lot of money writing romantic fantasies"
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
utopia - a work of fiction describing a utopia
2.fiction - a deliberately false or improbable accountfiction - a deliberately false or improbable account
falsehood, untruth, falsity - a false statement
canard - a deliberately misleading fabrication

fiction

noun
1. tale, story, novel, legend, myth, romance, fable, storytelling, narration, creative writing, work of imagination She is a writer of historical fiction.
2. imagination, fancy, fantasy, creativity a story of truth or fiction
3. lie, fancy, fantasy, invention, improvisation, fabrication, concoction, falsehood, untruth, porky (Brit. slang), pork pie (Brit. slang), urban myth, tall story, urban legend, cock and bull story (informal), figment of the imagination Total recycling is a fiction.
Quotations
"'Tis strange - but true; for truth is always strange;"
"Stranger than fiction" [Lord Byron Don Juan]
"Truth may be stranger than fiction, but fiction is truer" [Frederic Raphael Contemporary Novelists]
"Literature is a luxury. Fiction is a necessity" [G.K. Chesterton The Defendant]

fiction

noun
1. An illusory mental image:
2. Any fictitious idea accepted as part of an ideology by an uncritical group; a received idea:
4. A narrative not based on fact:
Translations
beletriefikce
fiktionskønlitteratur
kaunokirjallisuussepitetarufiktio
fikcija
regényirodalom
skáldskapur
フィクション
소설
grožinė literatūraišgalvotas
daiļliteratūraizdomājums
beletria
leposlovje
skönlitteratur
นวนิยาย
hayâl ürünü öykükurgu
tiểu thuyết

fiction

[ˈfɪkʃən] N
1. (Literat) → literatura f de ficción, narrativa f
a work of fictionuna obra de ficción
2. (= untruth) → ficción f, invención f

fiction

[ˈfɪkʃən] n
(= literary work) → fiction f
historical fiction → fiction historique
a work of fiction → une œuvre de fiction
(= invention) → fiction f
Total recycling is a fiction → L'idée de tout recycler relève de la fiction.

fiction

n
no pl (Liter) → Erzähl- or Prosaliteratur f; you’ll find that under fictiondas finden Sie unter Belletristik; work of fictionErzählung f; (longer) → Roman m; light fiction(leichte) Unterhaltungsliteratur; romantic fictionLiebesromane pl
(= invention)(freie) Erfindung, Fiktion f; that’s pure fictiondas ist frei erfunden; total recycling is a fictiondas totale Recycling gibt es nicht

fiction

[ˈfɪkʃn] n
a. (Literature) → narrativa
a work of fiction → un'opera di narrativa
light fiction → narrativa leggera
b. (sth made up) → finzione f

fiction

(ˈfikʃən) noun
stories etc which tell of imagined, not real, characters and events (see also non-fiction). I prefer reading fiction to hearing about real events.
ˈfictional adjective
fictitious (fikˈtiʃəs) adjective
1. not true. a fictitious account.
2. not real or based on fact. All the characters in the book are fictitious.

fiction

قِصَّةٌ خَيَالِيَّة beletrie fiktion Belletristik πεζογραφία ficción kaunokirjallisuus fiction fikcija fiction フィクション 소설 fictie fiksjon fikcja ficção художественная литература skönlitteratur นวนิยาย kurgu tiểu thuyết 小说
References in classic literature ?
Kreis came to Martin one day - Kreis, of the "real dirt"; and Martin turned to him with relief, to receive the glowing details of a scheme sufficiently wild-catty to interest him as a fictionist rather than an investor.
Indeed, the recent minor cyber crisis over the release of Sony's The Interview movie and North Korea's response showed that e-warfare isn't just in the minds of science fictionists and futurists.
but fictionists, strewn with now-you-see-them, now-you-don't
Fictionists share this difficulty with their nonfictionist brethren.
51) After Mustafa Kemal Ataturk's death in 1938, he was invited by Ismet Inonu to take up the gauntlet, and he became one of several fictionists serving as MPs in the Turkish Parliament.
What then about present-day and near-present-day pop fictionists who chose national issues and settings: Arthur Hailey (In High Places), David Walker (Where the High Winds Blow) and Alan Sullivan (Three Came to Ville Marie)?