fictitious


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fic·ti·tious

 (fĭk-tĭsh′əs)
adj.
1. Concocted or fabricated, especially in order to deceive or mislead; make up: a fictitious name; fictitious transactions.
2. Of or relating to the characters, settings, or plots that are created for a work of fiction: a book in which fictitious characters interact with historical figures.

[From Latin fictīcius, from fictus, past participle of fingere, to form; see fiction.]

fic·ti′tious·ly adv.
fic·ti′tious·ness n.

fictitious

(fɪkˈtɪʃəs)
adj
1. not genuine or authentic; assumed; false: to give a fictitious address.
2. of, relating to, or characteristic of fiction; created by the imagination
ficˈtitiously adv
ficˈtitiousness n

fic•ti•tious

(fɪkˈtɪʃ əs)

adj.
1. created, taken, or assumed for the sake of concealment; not genuine; false.
2. of, pertaining to, or consisting of fiction; created by the imagination.
[1605–15; < Latin fictīcius artificial]
fic•ti′tious•ly, adv.
fic•ti′tious•ness, n.

fictional

fictitious
1. 'fictional'

A fictional character, thing, or event occurs in a story, play, or film, and has never actually existed or happened.

I had to put myself into the position of lots of fictional characters.
...a musical about a fictional composer called Moony Shapiro.

Fictional also means 'relating to fiction and the telling of stories'.

James Joyce's final fictional experiment was a novel composed entirely of mathematical equations.
2. 'fictitious'

Something that is fictitious is false and is intended to deceive people.

They bought the materials under fictitious names.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fictitious - formed or conceived by the imagination; "a fabricated excuse for his absence"; "a fancied wrong"; "a fictional character"
unreal - lacking in reality or substance or genuineness; not corresponding to acknowledged facts or criteria; "ghosts and other unreal entities"; "unreal propaganda serving as news"
2.fictitious - adopted in order to deceive; "an assumed name"; "an assumed cheerfulness"; "a fictitious address"; "fictive sympathy"; "a pretended interest"; "a put-on childish voice"; "sham modesty"
counterfeit, imitative - not genuine; imitating something superior; "counterfeit emotion"; "counterfeit money"; "counterfeit works of art"; "a counterfeit prince"

fictitious

adjective
1. false, made-up, bogus, untrue, non-existent, fabricated, counterfeit, feigned, spurious, apocryphal a source of fictitious rumours
false real, true, actual, genuine, legitimate, authentic, truthful, veritable, dinkum (Austral & N.Z. informal), veracious
2. imaginary, imagined, made-up, assumed, invented, artificial, improvised, mythical, unreal, fanciful, make-believe Persons portrayed in this production are fictitious.

fictitious

adjective
Consisting or suggestive of fiction:
Translations
صُوَري، وَهْمي، غير حَقيقيمُخْتَلَق، غير حَقيقي
fiktivnísmyšlenývymyšlený
fiktiv
keksitty
fiktívkitalált
skáldaîur, ekki raunverulegurskáldaîur, ímyndaîur
fiktivfiktivt
izmišljenneresničen
gerçek olmayanhayâlî

fictitious

[fɪkˈtɪʃəs] ADJ
2. (= false) → falso

fictitious

[fɪkˈtɪʃəs] adj
(= invented) [character, event] → fictif/ive, imaginaire
(= untrue) → faux(fausse)

fictitious

adj
(= false, nonexistent) name, addressfalsch; loan, casefingiert; the job in the advertisement turned out to be fictitiouses stellte sich heraus, dass es die ausgeschriebene Stelle gar nicht gab
(Liter: = imaginary) character, setting, story, eventerfunden; all characters in this film are (entirely) fictitiousalle Gestalten in diesem Film sind (frei) erfunden

fictitious

[fɪkˈtɪʃəs] adj
b. (false) → falso/a, fittizio/a

fiction

(ˈfikʃən) noun
stories etc which tell of imagined, not real, characters and events (see also non-fiction). I prefer reading fiction to hearing about real events.
ˈfictional adjective
fictitious (fikˈtiʃəs) adjective
1. not true. a fictitious account.
2. not real or based on fact. All the characters in the book are fictitious.

fictitious

a. ficticio-a, falso-a.
References in classic literature ?
Still there are even some tragedies in which there are only one or two well known names, the rest being fictitious.
The mode of locomotion is, of course, purely imaginary, and the incidents and adventures fictitious.
It will contain, like the Tale, a short but real narrative; it will seek, like the Parable, to convey a hidden meaning, and that not so much by the use of language, as by the skilful introduction of fictitious characters; and yet unlike to either Tale or Parable, it will ever keep in view, as its high prerogative, and inseparable attribute, the great purpose of instruction, and will necessarily seek to inculcate some moral maxim, social duty, or political truth.
But perhaps it is always so, that men form their conceptions from fictitious, conventional types, and then--all the combinaisons made--they are tired of the fictitious figures and begin to invent more natural, true figures.
Actions described in novels are judged by a romantic system of morals as fictitious as the actions themselves.
Besides, fictitious narratives lead us to imagine the possibility of many events that are impossible; and even the most faithful histories, if they do not wholly misrepresent matters, or exaggerate their importance to render the account of them more worthy of perusal, omit, at least, almost always the meanest and least striking of the attendant circumstances; hence it happens that the remainder does not represent the truth, and that such as regulate their conduct by examples drawn from this source, are apt to fall into the extravagances of the knight-errants of romance, and to entertain projects that exceed their powers.
To the question of what causes historic events another answer presents itself, namely, that the course of human events is predetermined from on high- depends on the coincidence of the wills of all who take part in the events, and that a Napoleon's influence on the course of these events is purely external and fictitious.
As to whether the name be real or fictitious, it cannot greatly signify to those who know him only by his works.
The curate and the others thanked him and added their entreaties, and he finding himself so pressed said there was no occasion ask, where a command had such weight, and added, "If your worships will give me your attention you will hear a true story which, perhaps, fictitious ones constructed with ingenious and studied art cannot come up to.
At first, indeed, I pretended that I was describing the imaginary experiences of a fictitious person; but my enthusiasm soon forced me to throw off all disguise, and finally, in a fervent peroration, I exhorted all my hearers to divest themselves of prejudice and to become believers in the Third Dimension.
We can only guess why the great design was abandoned; perhaps because Plato became sensible of some incongruity in a fictitious history, or because he had lost his interest in it, or because advancing years forbade the completion of it; and we may please ourselves with the fancy that had this imaginary narrative ever been finished, we should have found Plato himself sympathizing with the struggle for Hellenic independence, singing a hymn of triumph over Marathon and Salamis, perhaps making the reflection of Herodotus where he contemplates the growth of the Athenian empire--"How brave a thing is freedom of speech, which has made the Athenians so far exceed every other state of Hellas in greatness
Foretel me that some tender maid, whose grandmother is yet unborn, hereafter, when, under the fictitious name of Sophia, she reads the real worth which once existed in my Charlotte, shall from her sympathetic breast send forth the heaving sigh.