fictitious

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fic·ti·tious

 (fĭk-tĭsh′əs)
adj.
1. Concocted or fabricated, especially in order to deceive or mislead; make up: a fictitious name; fictitious transactions.
2. Of or relating to the characters, settings, or plots that are created for a work of fiction: a book in which fictitious characters interact with historical figures.

[From Latin fictīcius, from fictus, past participle of fingere, to form; see fiction.]

fic·ti′tious·ly adv.
fic·ti′tious·ness n.

fictitious

(fɪkˈtɪʃəs)
adj
1. not genuine or authentic; assumed; false: to give a fictitious address.
2. of, relating to, or characteristic of fiction; created by the imagination
ficˈtitiously adv
ficˈtitiousness n

fic•ti•tious

(fɪkˈtɪʃ əs)

adj.
1. created, taken, or assumed for the sake of concealment; not genuine; false.
2. of, pertaining to, or consisting of fiction; created by the imagination.
[1605–15; < Latin fictīcius artificial]
fic•ti′tious•ly, adv.
fic•ti′tious•ness, n.

fictional

fictitious
1. 'fictional'

A fictional character, thing, or event occurs in a story, play, or film, and has never actually existed or happened.

I had to put myself into the position of lots of fictional characters.
...a musical about a fictional composer called Moony Shapiro.

Fictional also means 'relating to fiction and the telling of stories'.

James Joyce's final fictional experiment was a novel composed entirely of mathematical equations.
2. 'fictitious'

Something that is fictitious is false and is intended to deceive people.

They bought the materials under fictitious names.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fictitious - formed or conceived by the imagination; "a fabricated excuse for his absence"; "a fancied wrong"; "a fictional character"
unreal - lacking in reality or substance or genuineness; not corresponding to acknowledged facts or criteria; "ghosts and other unreal entities"; "unreal propaganda serving as news"
2.fictitious - adopted in order to deceive; "an assumed name"; "an assumed cheerfulness"; "a fictitious address"; "fictive sympathy"; "a pretended interest"; "a put-on childish voice"; "sham modesty"
counterfeit, imitative - not genuine; imitating something superior; "counterfeit emotion"; "counterfeit money"; "counterfeit works of art"; "a counterfeit prince"

fictitious

adjective
1. false, made-up, bogus, untrue, non-existent, fabricated, counterfeit, feigned, spurious, apocryphal a source of fictitious rumours
false real, true, actual, genuine, legitimate, authentic, truthful, veritable, dinkum (Austral & N.Z. informal), veracious
2. imaginary, imagined, made-up, assumed, invented, artificial, improvised, mythical, unreal, fanciful, make-believe Persons portrayed in this production are fictitious.

fictitious

adjective
Consisting or suggestive of fiction:
Translations
صُوَري، وَهْمي، غير حَقيقيمُخْتَلَق، غير حَقيقي
fiktivnísmyšlenývymyšlený
fiktiv
keksitty
fiktívkitalált
skáldaîur, ekki raunverulegurskáldaîur, ímyndaîur
fiktivfiktivt
izmišljenneresničen
gerçek olmayanhayâlî

fictitious

[fɪkˈtɪʃəs] ADJ
2. (= false) → falso

fictitious

[fɪkˈtɪʃəs] adj
(= invented) [character, event] → fictif/ive, imaginaire
(= untrue) → faux(fausse)

fictitious

adj
(= false, nonexistent) name, addressfalsch; loan, casefingiert; the job in the advertisement turned out to be fictitiouses stellte sich heraus, dass es die ausgeschriebene Stelle gar nicht gab
(Liter: = imaginary) character, setting, story, eventerfunden; all characters in this film are (entirely) fictitiousalle Gestalten in diesem Film sind (frei) erfunden

fictitious

[fɪkˈtɪʃəs] adj
b. (false) → falso/a, fittizio/a

fiction

(ˈfikʃən) noun
stories etc which tell of imagined, not real, characters and events (see also non-fiction). I prefer reading fiction to hearing about real events.
ˈfictional adjective
fictitious (fikˈtiʃəs) adjective
1. not true. a fictitious account.
2. not real or based on fact. All the characters in the book are fictitious.

fictitious

a. ficticio-a, falso-a.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abundant details--carefully designed fictive accoutrements, sleek in their form and with surfaces impeccably finished to fetishistic standards, as well as the calculated tension in the aligned connecting cables--contribute to the fictitiousness of the ise-en-scne.
This comic stock character of seventeenth-century Spanish drama exhibits the fictitiousness of the mythological universe in various ways, ranging from his scenic ubication (in the margins of the scene or perhaps even in the stalls, (43) crossing over into the space inhabited by the spectator, addressing him, and thus oscillating between intra- and extra-dramatic perspectives), (44) to his plot function (burlesque mirror image or countertype of the noble characters), (45) and witty and coarse manner of discourse (debasing the hero's tragic stature and jeopardizing the elevated status and credibility of the mythical universe.
The effect of these notes, and the intrusion of an often anonymous, disinterested commentator, is to further emphasize the novel's fictitiousness.
In fact it is in its fictitiousness that the story of Waheed's Nowgam village could well be anywhere in Kashmir.
The author himself, however, dismisses all doubts about the fictitiousness of the story at the beginning, stating in the very first sentence that the following sheets contain the "unaccountable Facts," supported by "the Affidavits of several Persons of undoubted Credit.