fiddle


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fid·dle

 (fĭd′l)
n.
1. A violin, especially one used to play folk or country music.
2. Nautical A guardrail used on a table during rough weather to prevent things from slipping off.
3. Informal Nonsensical, trifling matters: "There are things that are important / beyond all this fiddle" (Marianne Moore).
4. Chiefly British An instance of cheating or swindling; a fraud.
v. fid·dled, fid·dling, fid·dles
v.intr.
1. To play a fiddle.
2. To touch or handle something in a nervous way: fiddled with the collar of his shirt as he spoke.
3. To make unskilled efforts at repairing or improving: fiddled with the broken toaster.
4. To meddle or tamper: a reporter who fiddled with the facts.
5. Chiefly British To commit a fraud, especially to steal from one's employer.
v.tr.
1. To play (a tune) on a fiddle.
2. Chiefly British To alter or falsify for dishonest gain: fiddled the figures in the report.
Phrasal Verbs:
fiddle around
To act foolishly, playfully, or without a clear sense of purpose: Quit fiddling around and get to work!
fiddle away
To waste or squander: fiddled away the morning browsing the Internet.

[Middle English fidle, from Old English fithele.]

fid′dler n.

fiddle

(ˈfɪdəl)
n
1. informal any instrument of the viol or violin family, esp the violin
2. (Instruments) a violin played as a folk instrument
3. time-wasting or trifling behaviour; nonsense; triviality
4. (Nautical Terms) nautical a small railing around the top of a table to prevent objects from falling off it in bad weather
5. informal Brit an illegal or fraudulent transaction or arrangement
6. informal Brit a manually delicate or tricky operation
7. at the fiddle on the fiddle informal engaged in an illegal or fraudulent undertaking
8. face as long as a fiddle informal a dismal or gloomy facial expression
9. fit as a fiddle informal in very good health
10. play second fiddle informal to be subordinate; play a minor part
vb
11. (Music, other) to play (a tune) on the fiddle
12. (often foll by: with) to make restless or aimless movements with the hands
13. informal (when: intr, often foll by about or around) to spend (time) or act in a careless or inconsequential manner; waste (time)
14. (often foll by with) informal to tamper or interfere (with)
15. informal to contrive to do (something) by illicit means or deception: he fiddled his way into a position of trust.
16. (tr) informal to falsify (accounts, etc); swindle
[Old English fithele, probably from Medieval Latin vītula, from Latin vītulārī to celebrate; compare Old High German fidula fiddle; see viola1]

fid•dle

(ˈfɪd l)

n., v. -dled, -dling. n.
1. a musical instrument of the viol family.
2. violin.
3. a barrier to keep dishes, pots, utensils, etc., from sliding off a ship's table.
4. Informal. a swindle; fraud.
v.i.
5. to play the fiddle.
6. to make fussing movements with the hands (often fol. by with).
7. to manipulate something; tinker (often fol. by with).
8. to waste time; dally (often fol. by around).
9. to cheat.
v.t.
10. to play (a tune) on a fiddle.
11. to trifle or waste (usu. used with away): to fiddle time away.
12. Informal.
a. to falsify (accounts).
b. to contrive by cheating.
Idioms:
(as) fit as a fiddle, in perfect health.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English fithele]
fid′dler, n.
violin, fiddle - Violin is from Latin vitula, "stringed instrument"—from Vitula, a Roman goddess of joy and victory; her name also gave us fiddle.
See also related terms for violin.

fiddle


Past participle: fiddled
Gerund: fiddling

Imperative
fiddle
fiddle
Present
I fiddle
you fiddle
he/she/it fiddles
we fiddle
you fiddle
they fiddle
Preterite
I fiddled
you fiddled
he/she/it fiddled
we fiddled
you fiddled
they fiddled
Present Continuous
I am fiddling
you are fiddling
he/she/it is fiddling
we are fiddling
you are fiddling
they are fiddling
Present Perfect
I have fiddled
you have fiddled
he/she/it has fiddled
we have fiddled
you have fiddled
they have fiddled
Past Continuous
I was fiddling
you were fiddling
he/she/it was fiddling
we were fiddling
you were fiddling
they were fiddling
Past Perfect
I had fiddled
you had fiddled
he/she/it had fiddled
we had fiddled
you had fiddled
they had fiddled
Future
I will fiddle
you will fiddle
he/she/it will fiddle
we will fiddle
you will fiddle
they will fiddle
Future Perfect
I will have fiddled
you will have fiddled
he/she/it will have fiddled
we will have fiddled
you will have fiddled
they will have fiddled
Future Continuous
I will be fiddling
you will be fiddling
he/she/it will be fiddling
we will be fiddling
you will be fiddling
they will be fiddling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been fiddling
you have been fiddling
he/she/it has been fiddling
we have been fiddling
you have been fiddling
they have been fiddling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been fiddling
you will have been fiddling
he/she/it will have been fiddling
we will have been fiddling
you will have been fiddling
they will have been fiddling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been fiddling
you had been fiddling
he/she/it had been fiddling
we had been fiddling
you had been fiddling
they had been fiddling
Conditional
I would fiddle
you would fiddle
he/she/it would fiddle
we would fiddle
you would fiddle
they would fiddle
Past Conditional
I would have fiddled
you would have fiddled
he/she/it would have fiddled
we would have fiddled
you would have fiddled
they would have fiddled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fiddle - bowed stringed instrument that is the highest member of the violin familyfiddle - bowed stringed instrument that is the highest member of the violin family; this instrument has four strings and a hollow body and an unfretted fingerboard and is played with a bow
Amati - a violin made by Nicolo Amati or a member of his family
bowed stringed instrument, string - stringed instruments that are played with a bow; "the strings played superlatively well"
chin rest - a rest on which a violinist can place the chin
fiddlestick, violin bow - a bow used in playing the violin
Guarnerius - a violin made by a member of the Guarneri family
Strad, Stradavarius - a violin made by Antonio Stradivari or a member of his family
Verb1.fiddle - avoid (one's assigned duties); "The derelict soldier shirked his duties"
avoid - refrain from doing something; "She refrains from calling her therapist too often"; "He should avoid publishing his wife's memories"
scrimshank - British military language: avoid work
malinger, skulk - avoid responsibilities and duties, e.g., by pretending to be ill
slack - avoid responsibilities and work, be idle
2.fiddle - commit fraud and steal from one's employer; "We found out that she had been fiddling for years"
defalcate, embezzle, malversate, misappropriate, peculate - appropriate (as property entrusted to one's care) fraudulently to one's own use; "The accountant embezzled thousands of dollars while working for the wealthy family"
3.fiddle - play the violin or fiddle
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
fiddle - play on a violin; "Zuckerman fiddled that song very nicely"
play - perform music on (a musical instrument); "He plays the flute"; "Can you play on this old recorder?"
4.fiddle - play on a violin; "Zuckerman fiddled that song very nicely"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
spiel, play - replay (as a melody); "Play it again, Sam"; "She played the third movement very beautifully"
fiddle - play the violin or fiddle
5.fiddle - manipulate manually or in one's mind or imaginationfiddle - manipulate manually or in one's mind or imagination; "She played nervously with her wedding ring"; "Don't fiddle with the screws"; "He played with the idea of running for the Senate"
manipulate - hold something in one's hands and move it
put out, retire - cause to be out on a fielding play
6.fiddle - play around with or alter or falsify, usually secretively or dishonestlyfiddle - play around with or alter or falsify, usually secretively or dishonestly; "Someone tampered with the documents on my desk"; "The reporter fiddle with the facts"
manipulate - hold something in one's hands and move it
7.fiddle - try to fix or mend; "Can you tinker with the T.V. set--it's not working right"; "She always fiddles with her van on the weekend"
fix, furbish up, mend, repair, bushel, doctor, touch on, restore - restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken; "She repaired her TV set"; "Repair my shoes please"

fiddle

verb
1. (usually with with) fidget, play, finger, toy, tamper, trifle, mess about or around She fiddled with a pen on the desk.
2. (usually with with) tinker, adjust, interfere, mess about or around He fiddled with the radio dial.
3. (Informal) cheat, cook (informal), fix, manoeuvre (informal), graft (informal), diddle (informal), wangle (informal), gerrymander, finagle (informal) Stop fiddling your expenses account.
noun
1. (Brit. informal) fraud, racket, scam (slang), piece of sharp practice, fix, sting (informal), graft (informal), swindle, wangle (informal) legitimate businesses that act as a cover for tax fiddles
2. violin He played the fiddle at local dances.

fiddle

verb
1. To move one's fingers or hands in a nervous or aimless fashion:
2. To handle something idly, ignorantly, or destructively:
Informal: monkey.
phrasal verb
fiddle away
To pass (time) without working or in avoiding work:
dawdle (away), idle (away), kill, trifle away, waste, while (away), wile (away).
Translations
تَحايُل، غِشكَمان، رَبابَهيَتَلاعَب في الحِساباتيَعْبَثُ بِيَعْزِف على الكَمان
houslehrát na houslehrát sipodfukšvindlovat
fupnummerfuskelegesvindelsvindle
hegedülmanipulál
draga sér féfiîlafitla, fiktaleika á fiîlusvindl
krabassmuikassmuikininkassmuikuotisukčiauti
blēdībablēdītiesblēņotieskrāpšanakrāpties
hrať na husliachšvindľovať
igračkati seviolina
kemankeman çalmakoynayıp durmakpara sızdırmaksahtekârlık

fiddle

[ˈfɪdl]
A. N
1. (= violin) → violín m
to play second fiddledesempeñar un papel secundario
to play second fiddle to sbestar a la sombra de algn
he's fed up with playing second fiddle to his older brotherestá harto de estar a la sombra de su hermano mayor
2. (esp Brit) (= cheat) → trampa f, superchería f
it's a fiddleaquí hay trampa
tax fiddleevasión f fiscal
to work a fiddlehacer trampa
to be on the fiddlededicarse a hacer chanchullos
B. VI
1. (Mus) → tocar el violín
to fiddle while Rome burnsperder el tiempo con nimiedades e ignorar el verdadero problema
2. (= fidget) → enredar
do stop fiddling!¡deja ya de enredar!
to fiddle (about or around) with sthenredar or juguetear con algo
someone has been fiddling (about or around) with italguien lo ha estropeado, alguien ha estado enredando con él
3. (esp Brit) (= cheat) → hacer trampas
C. VT (esp Brit) [+ accounts, results, expenses claim etc] → manipular
to fiddle one's income taxdefraudar impuestos
fiddle about fiddle around VI + ADVperder el tiempo

fiddle

[ˈfɪdəl]
n
(= instrument) → violon m
to play the fiddle → jouer du violon
to be as fit as a fiddle [person] → être en pleine forme
to play second fiddle to sb → jouer les seconds rôles à côté de qn
(= cheating) → combine f, escroquerie f
tax fiddle → fraude f fiscale
to be on the fiddle (British) (= cheat) → traficoter
to work a fiddle → traficoter
vt (British) [+ accounts] → falsifier, truquer
vi (= play violin) → jouer du violon
to be fiddling while Rome burns → se perdre en futilités au lieu d'agir
fiddle with
vt fustripoter

fiddle

n
(Mus inf) → Fiedel f (inf), → Geige f; to play second fiddledie zweite Geige spielen; to play second fiddle to somebody (fig)in jds Schatten (dat)stehen; he refuses to play second fiddle (fig)er will immer die erste Geige spielen; as fit as a fiddlekerngesund
(Brit inf: = cheat, swindle) → Manipulation f, → Schiebung f; (with money) → faule Geschäfte pl (inf); it’s a fiddledas ist Schiebung!; there are so many fiddles going ones wird so viel getrickst (inf)or manipuliert; the accountants were well aware there had been some sort of fiddledie Buchprüfer wussten ganz genau, dass da irgendetwas manipuliert or frisiert (inf)worden war; tax fiddleSteuermanipulation f; to be on the fiddlefaule Geschäfte or krumme Dinger machen (inf)
it’s a bit of a fiddle (Brit: = quite tricky) → es ist eine ziemliche Fummelei (inf)
vi
(Mus inf) → fiedeln (inf), → geigen
(= fidget, play around)herumspielen; don’t fiddle with the engine if you don’t know what you’re doingspiel nicht am Motor herum, wenn du dich damit nicht auskennst; he sat there nervously fiddling with his tie/cigarette lighterer saß da und spielte nervös an seinem Schlips herum/spielte mit seinem Feuerzeug herum; put that thing down and stop fiddling!leg das Ding weg und hör endlich mit der Fummelei auf! (inf)
(= split hairs, be overprecise etc)Haare spalten, pingelig sein (inf)
vt
(Brit inf) accounts, resultsfrisieren (inf); electionmanipulieren; he fiddled it so that …er hat es so hingebogen or getrickst (inf), → dass …
tunefiedeln (inf), → geigen
interjach du liebe Zeit, ach du liebes Lottchen (hum inf)

fiddle

[ˈfɪdl]
1. n
a. (violin) → violino
to play second fiddle to sb (fig) → avere un ruolo di secondo piano rispetto a qn
b. (fam) (cheating) → imbroglio, truffa
it's a fiddle → è un imbroglio
tax fiddle → frode f fiscale
to work a fiddle → fare un imbroglio
to be on the fiddle → imbrogliare
2. vi (fidget) → giocherellare, gingillarsi
do stop fiddling! → stai fermo!
to fiddle (about) with sth → giocherellare/gingillarsi con qc
3. vt (Brit) (fam) (accounts, results) → falsificare, alterare
fiddle about fiddle around vt + advgingillarsi, giocherellare

fiddle

(ˈfidl) noun
1. a violin. She played the fiddle.
2. a dishonest business arrangement. He's working a fiddle over his taxes.
verb
1. to play a violin. He fiddled while they danced.
2. (with with) to make restless, aimless movements. Stop fiddling with your pencil!
3. to manage (money, accounts etc) dishonestly. She has been fiddling the accounts for years.
ˈfiddler noun
fiddler crab
a small crab, the male of which has an enlarged claw.
on the fiddle
dishonest. He's always on the fiddle.
References in classic literature ?
Ain't it a relishin' sight to see her settin' there as fine as a fiddle, anch a happy procession as filed away into the little dining room
He had brought his fiddle with him, which wouldn't be of much use here, though he used to pick up money by it at home.
It would be an ugly business, indeed, if Judge Pyncheon (who would not have cared a fig for Paganini's fiddle in his most harmonious mood) should make his appearance at the door, with a bloody shirt-bosom, and a grim frown on his swarthily white visage, and motion the foreign vagabond away
His fiddle is out of tune, and there is no rosin on his bow, but still he is an inspired man--the hands of the muses have been laid upon him.
Here they are fed full daily; and, because some incline to pine, a fiddle is kept commonly going among them, and they are made to dance daily; and he who refuses to be merry--in whose soul thoughts of wife, or child, or home, are too strong for him to be gay--is marked as sullen and dangerous, and subjected to all the evils which the ill will of an utterly irresponsible and hardened man can inflict upon him.
Hindley named a fiddle, and then he asked Miss Cathy; she was hardly six years old, but she could ride any horse in the stable, and she chose a whip.
He made many attempts to induce me to consent to an exchange; at one time coming out with a fishing-rod, at another with a fiddle, at another with a cocked hat, at another with a flute.
There was a buzz of voices through the house, as Miss Nancy entered, mingled with the scrape of a fiddle preluding in the kitchen; but the Lammeters were guests whose arrival had evidently been thought of so much that it had been watched for from the windows, for Mrs.
At the time of the "pardons," or Breton pilgrimages, the village festival and dances, he went off with his fiddle, as in the old days, and was allowed to take his daughter with him for a week.
It says--`The cat and the fiddle,'" he gasped, and forthwith he became a convert to telephony.
Nicholson was ambitious for his family (in which, and the Disruption Principles, he entirely lived), and he hated to see a son of his play second fiddle to an idler.
To say nothing of Joshua Rann's fiddle, which, by an act of generous forethought, he had provided himself with, in case any one should be of sufficiently pure taste to prefer dancing to a solo on that instrument.