fiddler


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fid·dle

 (fĭd′l)
n.
1. A violin, especially one used to play folk or country music.
2. Nautical A guardrail used on a table during rough weather to prevent things from slipping off.
3. Informal Nonsensical, trifling matters: "There are things that are important / beyond all this fiddle" (Marianne Moore).
4. Chiefly British An instance of cheating or swindling; a fraud.
v. fid·dled, fid·dling, fid·dles
v.intr.
1. To play a fiddle.
2. To touch or handle something in a nervous way: fiddled with the collar of his shirt as he spoke.
3. To make unskilled efforts at repairing or improving: fiddled with the broken toaster.
4. To meddle or tamper: a reporter who fiddled with the facts.
5. Chiefly British To commit a fraud, especially to steal from one's employer.
v.tr.
1. To play (a tune) on a fiddle.
2. Chiefly British To alter or falsify for dishonest gain: fiddled the figures in the report.
Phrasal Verbs:
fiddle around
To act foolishly, playfully, or without a clear sense of purpose: Quit fiddling around and get to work!
fiddle away
To waste or squander: fiddled away the morning browsing the internet.

[Middle English fidle, from Old English fithele.]

fid′dler n.

fiddler

(ˈfɪdlə)
n
1. (Music, other) a person who plays the fiddle, esp in folk music
2. (Animals) See fiddler crab
3. a person who wastes time or acts aimlessly
4. informal a cheat or petty rogue
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fiddler - a musician who plays the violinfiddler - a musician who plays the violin  
instrumentalist, musician, player - someone who plays a musical instrument (as a profession)
2.fiddler - someone who manipulates in a nervous or unconscious manner
manipulator - a person who handles things manually
3.fiddler - an unskilled person who tries to fix or mend
unskilled person - a person who lacks technical training
Translations
عازِف الكَمان
houslistapodfukář
fidusmagerspillemandsvindlerviolinspiller
hegedûs
fiîlari; fitlari; svindlari
muzikant

fiddler

[ˈfɪdləʳ] N
1. (Mus) → violinista mf
2. (esp Brit) (= cheat) → tramposo/a m/f

fiddler

n
(Mus inf) → Geiger(in) m(f)
(inf: = cheat) → Schwindler(in) m(f), → Betrüger(in) m(f)

fiddler

[ˈfɪdləʳ] n
a. (Mus) → violinista m/f
b. (fam) (cheat) → imbroglione/a

fiddle

(ˈfidl) noun
1. a violin. She played the fiddle.
2. a dishonest business arrangement. He's working a fiddle over his taxes.
verb
1. to play a violin. He fiddled while they danced.
2. (with with) to make restless, aimless movements. Stop fiddling with your pencil!
3. to manage (money, accounts etc) dishonestly. She has been fiddling the accounts for years.
ˈfiddler noun
fiddler crab
a small crab, the male of which has an enlarged claw.
on the fiddle
dishonest. He's always on the fiddle.
References in classic literature ?
Then they tucked the old man into a beauti- ful room, which was the spare room, and in the night some time he got powerful thirsty and clumb out on to the porch-roof and slid down a stanchion and traded his new coat for a jug of forty-rod, and clumb back again and had a good old time; and towards daylight he crawled out again, drunk as a fiddler, and rolled off the porch and broke his left arm in two places, and was most froze to death when somebody found him after sun-up.
It is my opinion the fiddler David must have been an insipid sort of fellow; I like black Bothwell better: to my mind a man is nothing without a spice of the devil in him; and history may say what it will of James Hepburn, but I have a notion, he was just the sort of wild, fierce, bandit hero whom I could have consented to gift with my hand.
In came a fiddler with a music-book, and went up to the lofty desk, and made an orchestra of it, and tuned like fifty stomach-aches.
To be sure," he said, following up the landlord's conciliatory view, "we're fond of our old clerk; it's nat'ral, and him used to be such a singer, and got a brother as is known for the first fiddler in this country-side.
Not a fiddler throughout the length and breadth of Scandinavia played as he did.
Two days after there came by a travelling fiddler, who began to play under the window and beg alms; and when the king heard him, he said,
By this time the music had stopped, and the musicians-a fiddler, and the young lady who played the harmonium on Sundays-were hastily refreshing themselves at one corner of the supper-table which aligned its devastated pie-dishes and ice-cream saucers on the platform at the end of the hall.
That in addition, it suits us not that any fiddler, barber, or any soldier varlet should be clad like a prince, in velvet, cloth of silk, and rings of gold.
The Casaubon cuttle-fish fluid to begin with, and then a rebellious Polish fiddler or dancing-master, was it?
And when the fiddler, peering into the front room, remarked to the pianist, "It's Burning Daylight," the waltz-time perceptibly quickened, and the dancers, catching the contagion, began to whirl about as if they really enjoyed it.
The corpulent black fiddler, and his friend who plays the tambourine, stamp upon the boarding of the small raised orchestra in which they sit, and play a lively measure.
A fiddler who was present, and who appeared to act as the appointed minstrel of the company, forthwith struck up a Scotch reel; and that in tones so invigorating, that Hugh and his friend (who had both been drinking before) rose from their seats as by previous concert, and, to the great admiration of the assembled guests, performed an extemporaneous No-Popery Dance.