fieldfare

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field·fare

 (fēld′fâr′)
n.
An Old World thrush (Turdus pilaris) having gray and reddish-brown plumage.

[Middle English feldfare, from Old English feldeware, error for *feldefare : perhaps feld, field; see field + *-fare, goer (from faran, to go; see per- in Indo-European roots).]

fieldfare

(ˈfiːldˌfɛə)
n
(Animals) a large Old World thrush, Turdus pilaris, having a pale grey head and rump, brown wings and back, and a blackish tail
[Old English feldefare; see field, fare]

field•fare

(ˈfildˌfɛər)

n.
a European thrush, Turdus pilaris, having reddish brown plumage with an ashy head.
[before 1100; Middle English feldefare (with two f's by alliterative assimilation), Old English feldeware]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fieldfare - medium-sized Eurasian thrush seen chiefly in winterfieldfare - medium-sized Eurasian thrush seen chiefly in winter
thrush - songbirds characteristically having brownish upper plumage with a spotted breast
genus Turdus, Turdus - type genus of the Turdidae
Translations
KrammetsvogelWacholderdrossel
räkättirastas
kwiczoł

fieldfare

[ˈfiːldfɛəʳ] Nzorzal m real

fieldfare

[ˈfiːldˈfɛəʳ] n (Zool) → viscarda
References in classic literature ?
And David answered, "I see the windmills swinging and three tall poplar trees swaying against the sky, and a flock of fieldfares are flying over the hill; but nought else do I see, good master.
The former, called by the Chilenos "el Turco," is as large as a fieldfare, to which bird it has some alliance; but its legs are much longer, tail shorter, and beak stronger: its colour is a reddish brown.
I was on Holy Island at daybreak in autumn last year and I saw many thousands of migrating starlings, redwings and fieldfares coming out of the darkness straight from the sea and heading inland.
The first Redwing of winter was in a Pen Llyn garden on the 13th, and more were with Fieldfares in Conwy Valley's Caerhun churchyard.
Yes the swallows, swifts and ospreys have all travelled back to Africa and many of our mammals go into hibernation, but in their place we see redwings, fieldfares and waxwings, a plethora of geese, ducks and swans and our native numbers of starlings, blackbirds and robins are swelled.
Meanwhile, the RSPB said species that spend the winter here are still behaving as if it is winter, with waxwings, fieldfares and redwings still in the countryside in large numbers and showing little signs of heading north.
Fieldfares, one of the winter visitors from northern Europe have already been seen in Norfolk.
There were fieldfares, redwings and blackbirds among a flock of about 50 to 60 birds.
The red and orange spread across our gardens and hedges is a welcome sight for Arctic visitors like redwings, fieldfares and even our resident blackbirds and thrushes.
In the spring swallows, martins, warblers and cuckoos cause much excitement and comment, in the autumn redwings and fieldfares much less so.
But the icy weather meant more sightings of fieldfares, redwings and bullfinches as they headed in from the countryside in search of food.
The weather was also responsible for many more sightings of countryside birds like fieldfares, bullfinches and yellowhammers in gardens.