fiend


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fiend

 (fēnd)
n.
1.
a. An evil spirit; a demon.
b. The Devil; Satan.
c. A diabolically evil or wicked person.
2. Informal One who is addicted to something: a dope fiend.
3. Informal One who is completely absorbed in or obsessed with a given job or pastime: a crossword-puzzle fiend.
4. Informal One who is particularly adept at something: a fiend with computers.
v. fiend·ed, fiend·ing, fiends Slang
v.tr.
To crave (a drug, for example): fiended cocaine.
v.intr.
To have an intense desire for something: fiended for the band's new release.

[Middle English, from Old English fēond; see pē(i)- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

fiend

(fiːnd)
n
1. an evil spirit; demon; devil
2. a person who is extremely wicked, esp in being very cruel or brutal
3. informal
a. a person who is intensely interested in or fond of something: a fresh-air fiend; he is a fiend for cards.
b. an addict: a drug fiend.
4. (informal) a mischievous or spiteful person, esp a child
[Old English fēond; related to Old Norse fjāndi enemy, Gothic fijands, Old High German fīant]
ˈfiendˌlike adj

Fiend

(fiːnd)
n
(Bible) the Fiend the devil; Satan

fiend

(find)

n.
1. Satan.
2. a demon.
3. a diabolically cruel or wicked person.
4. Informal.
a. buff; fan: a baseball fiend.
b. addict: dope fiends.
5. Informal. a person who is outstandingly skilled at something; whiz.
[before 900; Middle English feend, Old English fēond; c. Old Saxon fīond, Old High German fīant, Old Norse fjandr, Gothic fijands foe]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fiend - a cruel wicked and inhuman personfiend - a cruel wicked and inhuman person  
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
demoniac - someone who acts as if possessed by a demon
2.fiend - an evil supernatural beingfiend - an evil supernatural being    
evil spirit - a spirit tending to cause harm
incubus - a male demon believed to lie on sleeping persons and to have sexual intercourse with sleeping women
succuba, succubus - a female demon believed to have sexual intercourse with sleeping men
dibbuk, dybbuk - (Jewish folklore) a demon that enters the body of a living person and controls that body's behavior
3.fiend - a person motivated by irrational enthusiasm (as for a cause)fiend - a person motivated by irrational enthusiasm (as for a cause); "A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject"--Winston Churchill
enthusiast, partizan, partisan - an ardent and enthusiastic supporter of some person or activity

fiend

noun
1. brute, monster, savage, beast, degenerate, barbarian, ogre, ghoul a saint to his parents and a fiend to his children
2. (Informal) enthusiast, fan, addict, freak (informal), fanatic, maniac, energumen a strong-tea fiend
3. demon, devil, evil spirit, hellhound She is a fiend incarnate, leading these people to eternal damnation.

fiend

noun
1. A perversely bad, cruel, or wicked person:
2. Informal. A person who is ardently devoted to a particular subject or activity:
Informal: buff, fan.
Slang: freak, nut.
Translations
إنسان شِرّيرإنسان مولَع بِشَيءشَيْطان، إبْليس
ďábelnadšenec
=-dyrker=-fandjævelsatan
megszállottja
fíkill, sem er óîur í e-îfjandi, púki, djöfullillmenni
šėtonasšėtoniškaišėtoniškasvelnioniškaivelnioniškas
entuziastsļaundarissātanstīrais velnsvelns
…狂…迷恶毒的人魔鬼

fiend

[fiːnd] N
1. (= devil) → demonio m, diablo m
2. (= person) → malvado/a m/f
3. (= addict) drugs fienddrogadicto/a m/f
sex fiendmaníaco m sexual

fiend

[ˈfiːnd] ndémon m

fiend

n
(= evil spirit)Teufel m, → Dämon m; (= person)Teufel m; the Fiendder böse Feind; “sex fiend strikes again”„Sexbestie schlägt wieder zu“
(inf: = addict) → Fanatiker(in) m(f); tennis fiendTennisnarr m; she’s a fresh-air fiendsie ist Frischluftfanatikerin

fiend

[fiːnd] ndemonio
you little fiend! (fam) → piccolo delinquente!
a tennis fiend → un fanatico or patito del tennis

fiend

(fiːnd) noun
1. a devil. the fiends of hell.
2. a wicked or cruel person. She's an absolute fiend when she's angry.
3. a person who is very enthusiastic about something. a fresh air fiend; a fiend for work.
ˈfiendish adjective
1. wicked or devilish. a fiendish temper.
2. very difficult, clever etc. a fiendish plan.
ˈfiendishly adverb
1. wickedly.
2. very. fiendishly difficult.
References in classic literature ?
In the incident now to be sketched, there was a touching recognition, on Clifford's part, of God's care and love towards him,--towards this poor, forsaken man, who, if any mortal could, might have been pardoned for regarding himself as thrown aside, forgotten, and left to be the sport of some fiend, whose playfulness was an ecstasy of mischief.
O Fiend, whose talisman was that fatal symbol, wouldst thou leave nothing, whether in youth or age, for this poor sinner to revere?
Now what cozening fiend it was, gentlemen, that possessed Radney to meddle with such a man in that corporeally exasperated state, I know not; but so it happened.
Yet she did not hear him--she was still in the grip of the fiend.
They offered eighteen hundred dollars to redeem her; and some there were who offered to give, that would not have much left after the gift; but the fiend of a slave-trader was inexorable.
Now were the fickle monks tempted of the Fiend, and they wrought with their abbot un- ceasingly by beggings and beseechings that he would construct a bath; and when he was become aweary and might not resist more, he said have ye your will, then, and granted that they asked.
I've had the will back only three months, and am already deep in debt again, and moving heaven and earth to save myself from exposure and destruction, with a reasonably fair show of getting the thing covered up if I'm let alone, and now this fiend has gone and found me out somehow or other.
The mortgage was depicted as a cross between a fiend and an ogre, and held an axe uplifted in his red right hand.
The fiend pinning down the thief's pack behind him, I passed over quickly: it was an object of terror.
If the little fiend had got in at the window, she probably would have strangled me
It was an inconsistent and ubiquitous fiend too, for, while it was making the whole night behind him dreadful, he darted out into the roadway to avoid dark alleys, fearful of its coming hopping out of them like a dropsical boy's-Kite without tail and wings.
When I was very small and timid, he gave me to understand that the Devil lived in a black corner of the forge, and that he knew the fiend very well: also that it was necessary to make up the fire, once in seven years, with a live boy, and that I might consider myself fuel.