fiendish


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fiend·ish

 (fēn′dĭsh)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or suggestive of a fiend; diabolical.
2. Extremely wicked or cruel.
3. Extremely bad, disagreeable, or difficult: a fiendish blizzard; a fiendish problem.

fiend′ish·ly adv.
fiend′ish·ness n.

fiendish

(ˈfiːndɪʃ)
adj
1. of or like a fiend
2. diabolically wicked or cruel
3. informal extremely difficult or unpleasant: a fiendish problem.
ˈfiendishly adv
ˈfiendishness n

fiend•ish

(ˈfin dɪʃ)

adj.
diabolically cruel, wicked, or difficult.
[1520–30]
fiend′ish•ly, adv.
fiend′ish•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fiendish - extremely evil or cruelfiendish - extremely evil or cruel; expressive of cruelty or befitting hell; "something demonic in him--something that could be cruel"; "fires lit up a diabolic scene"; "diabolical sorcerers under the influence of devils"; "a fiendish despot"; "hellish torture"; "infernal instruments of war"; "satanic cruelty"; "unholy grimaces"
evil - morally bad or wrong; "evil purposes"; "an evil influence"; "evil deeds"

fiendish

fiendish

adjective
Perversely bad, cruel, or wicked:
Translations
شَيْطانيصَعْب جِدا، ذَكي جِدا
ďábelskýzlomyslný
djævelskhelvedesnederdrægtig
paholaismainenpirullinen
ördögien gonosz
bráîsnjalldjöfullegur
악마
démonický

fiendish

[ˈfiːndɪʃ] ADJ (= fierce) → feroz; (= mildly wicked) → muy travieso; (= clever and wicked) → diabólico (= difficult and unpleasant) → dificilísimo

fiendish

[ˈfiːndɪʃ] adj
(= very clever) [plan, action, device] → diabolique
(= very difficult) [problem, task] → infernal(e)
(= cruel) [person] → diabolique

fiendish

adj
(= cruel) person, act, lookteuflisch; delight, glee, laughterhämisch; he took a fiendish delight in doing ites machte ihm eine höllische Freude, es zu tun
(inf: = cunning) plan, device, gadgethöllisch raffiniert or clever (inf)
(inf: = very difficult) problemverzwickt (inf), → höllisch schwer (inf)

fiendish

[ˈfiːndɪʃ] adj (cruelty, smile, plot) → diabolico/a (fam) (difficult and unpleasant) → tremendo/a
I had a fiendish time trying to ... → è stato un lavoraccio tentare di...

fiend

(fiːnd) noun
1. a devil. the fiends of hell.
2. a wicked or cruel person. She's an absolute fiend when she's angry.
3. a person who is very enthusiastic about something. a fresh air fiend; a fiend for work.
ˈfiendish adjective
1. wicked or devilish. a fiendish temper.
2. very difficult, clever etc. a fiendish plan.
ˈfiendishly adverb
1. wickedly.
2. very. fiendishly difficult.
References in classic literature ?
He knew, too, that they seldom lost much time before consummating the fiendish purpose of their captures.
laughed both the sooty wretches; and the diabolical sounds seemed, in truth, a not unapt expression of the fiendish character which Legree gave them.
In conformation it was similar to a cat--a huge cat, exaggerated colossal cat, with fiendish eyes and the most devilish cast of countenance, as it wrinkled its bristling snout and bared its great yellow fangs.
Philip had a fiendish instinct for discovering other people's raw spots, and was able to say things that rankled because they were true.
As I backed along the ledge I soon was past the mouth of the cave, where I no longer could see those fearful flaming eyes, but an instant later I caught sight of the fiendish face of a Sagoth as it warily advanced beyond the cliff's turn on the far side of the cave's mouth.
Slowly but surely was Norman of Torn cutting Peter of Colfax to pieces; little by little, and with such fiendish care that except for loss of blood, the man was in no way crippled; nor did the outlaw touch his victim's face with his gleaming sword; that he was saving for the fulfillment of his design.
Simon Nishikanta was fiendish in his descriptions of whatever miscreant had done the deed and of how he should be made to suffer for it, while Grimshaw clenched and repeatedly clenched his great hands as if throttling some throat.
Dan and Peter pursued them down the lane with a fiendish din of bells and pans, much to Felicity's wrath.
He seemed to take pleasure in manifesting his fiendish barbarity.
I was positive now that the trailers were Apaches and that they wished to capture Powell alive for the fiendish pleasure of the torture, so I urged my horse onward at a most dangerous pace, hoping against hope that I would catch up with the red rascals before they attacked him.
In his primitive brain revolved various fiendish plans for a revenge that he would not have the courage to put into effect when the test came and he stood face to face with one of the dominant race.
As they saw us a fiendish shout of triumph rose from their ranks.