fifth disease


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fifth disease

n.
A usually mild disease, primarily of children, that is caused by a parvovirus and is characterized by fever, a prominent, often bright red rash on the cheeks that may spread to the trunk and limbs, and swollen, painful joints. Also called erythema infectiosum.

[From its being fifth in frequency of rash-producing childhood diseases.]

fifth disease

n
(Pathology) a mild infectious disease of childhood, caused by a virus, characterized by fever and a red rash spreading from the cheeks to the limbs and trunk. Also called: slapped-cheek disease Technical name: erythema infectiosum
[C20: from its being among the five most common childhood infections]
References in periodicals archive ?
Slapped cheek syndrome, sometimes called fifth disease due to a mild viral infection which can be confused with scarlet fever and German measles in children.
20) Since then researchers have determined that it is also the cause of erythema infectiosum or fifth disease of childhood.
Soon my grandson will have overcome his Fifth Disease without, I hope, graduating to any higher numbers.
One month later, she told the same ObGyn that she had been exposed to Fifth disease.
Along with fifth disease, it may cause joint symptoms or arthritis in both children and adults, mostly women.
Just as we stow away the image of the lacy rash of Fifth disease, we also should stockpile parenting tidbits.
Cancer, AIDS, Ebola, West Nile virus, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, anthrax, Asian Bird flu, Fifth disease, MRSA, MERS, etal.
It is also called fifth disease, "slapped cheek" or erythema infectiosum.
Parvovirus, which is common in childhood, is known as fifth disease or slapped-cheek syndrome and causes a blotchy red rash and mild fever.
The most common clinical presentations of infection are fifth disease or erythema infectiosum, arthropathy and hydrops fetalis, which are found among immunocompetent hosts (2), (3), (38).
The "slapped cheeks" of Fifth disease are thought to appear only after the child is no longer viremic.
A common one is slapped cheek syndrome, or Fifth disease, which is caused by the parvovirus.