figurative


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

fig·u·ra·tive

 (fĭg′yər-ə-tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Based on or making use of figures of speech; metaphorical: figurative language.
b. Containing many figures of speech; ornate.
2. Represented by a figure or resemblance; symbolic or emblematic.
3. Of or relating to artistic representation by means of animal or human figures.

fig′u·ra·tive·ly adv.
fig′u·ra·tive·ness n.

figurative

(ˈfɪɡərətɪv)
adj
1. (Rhetoric) of the nature of, resembling, or involving a figure of speech; not literal; metaphorical
2. (Rhetoric) using or filled with figures of speech
3. (Art Terms) representing by means of an emblem, likeness, figure, etc
4. (Art Terms) (in painting, sculpture, etc) of, relating to, or characterized by the naturalistic representation of the external world
ˈfiguratively adv
ˈfigurativeness n

fig•ur•a•tive

(ˈfɪg yər ə tɪv)

adj.
1. of the nature of or involving a figure of speech, esp. a metaphor; metaphorical; not literal.
2. characterized by or abounding in figures of speech.
3. representing by means of a figure or likeness, as in drawing or sculpture.
4. representing by a figure or emblem; emblematic.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Late Latin]
fig′ur•a•tive•ness, n.

figurative

Representing a human or an animal form.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.figurative - (used of the meanings of words or text) not literal; using figures of speech; "figurative language"
rhetorical - given to rhetoric, emphasizing style at the expense of thought; "mere rhetorical frippery"
literal - limited to the explicit meaning of a word or text; "a literal translation"
2.figurative - consisting of or forming human or animal figures; "a figural design"; "the figurative art of the humanistic tradition"- Herbert Read
representational - (used especially of art) depicting objects, figures,or scenes as seen; "representational art"; "representational images"

figurative

Translations
مَجازي، إسْتِعاري
obrazný
billedlig
képletes
líkinga-; myndrænn; óeiginlegur
obrazný
mecâzi

figurative

[ˈfɪgərətɪv] ADJ
1. [meaning] → figurado; [expression] → metafórico
2. (Art) → figurativo

figurative

[ˈfɪgərətɪv] adj [sense] → figuré(e)
in a figurative sense → au sens figuré

figurative

adj
(= metaphorical) languagebildlich; use, senseübertragen; in a figurative senseim übertragenen Sinn
(Art) art, painting, sculpture, artistgegenständlich

figurative

[ˈfɪgərətɪv] adj (meaning) → figurato/a (Art) → figurativo/a

figure

(ˈfigə) , ((American) ˈfigjər) noun
1. the form or shape of a person. A mysterious figure came towards me; That girl has got a good figure.
2. a (geometrical) shape. The page was covered with a series of triangles, squares and other geometrical figures.
3. a symbol representing a number. a six-figure telephone number.
4. a diagram or drawing to explain something. The parts of a flower are shown in figure 3.
verb
1. to appear (in a story etc). She figures largely in the story.
2. to think, estimate or consider. I figured that you would arrive before half past eight.
ˈfigurative (-rətiv) adjective
of or using figures of speech. figurative language.
ˈfiguratively adverb
ˈfigurehead noun
1. a person who is officially a leader but who does little or has little power. She is the real leader of the party – he is only a figurehead.
2. an ornamental figure (usually of carved wood) attached to the front of a ship.
figure of speech
one of several devices (eg metaphor, simile) for using words not with their ordinary meanings but to make a striking effect.
figure out
to understand. I can't figure out why he said that.
References in classic literature ?
We loved change, too, like other people, and had probably seen enough of vegetation, whether figurative or real, to satisfy us.
These expressions, though figurative, sufficiently indicated the bent of Mrs.
It was in these apartments that Mr Swiveller made use of the expressions above recorded for the consolation and encouragement of his desponding friend; and it may not be uninteresting or improper to remark that even these brief observations partook in a double sense of the figurative and poetical character of Mr Swiveller's mind, as the rosy wine was in fact represented by one glass of cold gin-and-water, which was replenished as occasion required from a bottle and jug upon the table, and was passed from one to another, in a scarcity of tumblers which, as Mr Swiveller's was a bachelor's establishment, may be acknowledged without a blush.
This figurative address seemed to have great weight with the young man, who gradually yielded to the representations of Marmaduke, and eventually consented to his proposal.
Don't put words into my mouth that I don't mean,' said Jeremiah, sticking to his figurative expression with tenacious and impenetrable obstinacy: 'I mean dropped down upon me.
The two lime merchants, with their escort, entered the dominions of Miss Abbey Potterson, to whom their escort (presenting them and their pretended business over the half-door of the bar, in a confidential way) preferred his figurative request that 'a mouthful of fire' might be lighted in Cosy.
Though the figurative language of David was not very intelligible, the sincere and steady expression of his eye, and the glow of his honest countenance, were not easily mistaken.
John's eyes, though clear enough in a literal sense, in a figurative one were difficult to fathom.
I might have gone on in this figurative manner, if Dora's face had not admonished me that she was wondering with all her might whether I was going to propose any new kind of vaccination, or other medical remedy, for this unwholesome state of ours.
Indeed, though Indians are generally very lofty, rhetorical, and figurative in their language at all great talks, and high ceremonials, yet, if trappers and traders may be believed, they are the most unsavory vagabonds in their ordinary colloquies; they make no hesitation to call a spade a spade; and when they once undertake to call hard names, the famous pot and kettle, of vituperating memory, are not to be compared with them for scurrility of epithet.
The figurative phrase was true: she was another woman than the one who had excited his desire.
Sir Leicester Dedlock has got the better, for the time being, of the family gout and is once more, in a literal no less than in a figurative point of view, upon his legs.