filled


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fill

 (fĭl)
v. filled, fill·ing, fills
v.tr.
1.
a. To put something into (a container, for example) to capacity or to a desired level: fill a glass with milk; filled the tub with water.
b. To supply or provide to the fullest extent: filled the mall with new stores.
c. To build up the level of (low-lying land) with material such as earth or gravel.
d. To stop or plug up (an opening, for example).
e. To repair a cavity of (a tooth).
f. To add a foreign substance to (cloth or wood, for example).
2.
a. To flow or move into (a container or area), often to capacity: Water is filling the basement. Fans are filling the stadium.
b. To pervade: Music filled the room.
3.
a. To satiate, as with food and drink: The guests filled themselves with pie.
b. To engage or occupy completely: a song that filled me with nostalgia.
4.
a. To satisfy or meet; fulfill: fill the requirements. See Synonyms at satisfy.
b. To supply what is specified by or required for: fill a prescription; fill an order.
5.
a. To put a person into (a job or position): We filled the job with a new hire.
b. To discharge the duties of; occupy: How long has she filled that post?
6. To cover the surface of (an inexpensive metal) with a layer of precious metal, such as gold.
7. Nautical
a. To cause (a sail) to swell.
b. To adjust (a yard) so that wind will cause a sail to swell.
v.intr.
To become full: The basement is filling with water.
n.
1. An amount needed to make full, complete, or satisfied: eat one's fill.
2. Material for filling a container, cavity, or passage.
3.
a. A built-up piece of land; an embankment.
b. The material, such as earth or gravel, used for this.
Phrasal Verbs:
fill in
1. To write information in (a blank space, as on a form).
2. To write in (information) in a blank space.
3. Informal To provide with information that is essential or newly acquired: I wasn't there—would you fill me in?
4. To act as a substitute; stand in: an understudy who filled in at the last minute.
fill out
1. To complete (a form, for example) by providing required information: carefully filled out the job application.
2. To become or make more fleshy: He filled out after age 35.
Idioms:
fill (someone's) shoes
To assume someone's position or duties.
fill the bill Informal
To serve a particular purpose.

[Middle English fillen, from Old English fyllan; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

fill′a·ble adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.filled - (usually followed by `with' or used as a combining form) generously supplied with; "theirs was a house filled with laughter"; "a large hall filled with rows of desks"; "fog-filled air"
combining form - a bound form used only in compounds; "`hemato-' is a combining form in words like `hematology'"
full - containing as much or as many as is possible or normal; "a full glass"; "a sky full of stars"; "a full life"; "the auditorium was full to overflowing"
2.filled - of purchase orders that have been filled
unfilled - of purchase orders that have not been filled
3.filled - (of time) taken up; "well-filled hours"
occupied - held or filled or in use; "she keeps her time well occupied"; "the wc is occupied"
Translations
مَملوء
naplněnýplný
fyldt
megtelt
fylltur

filled

[ˈfɪld] adj
filled with (= full of) [space, room] → rempli(e) de

filled

[fɪld] adj filled with (room) → completamente occupato/a da
to be filled with resentment → essere colmo/a di rancore
eyes filled with tears → occhi pieni di lacrime

fill

(fil) verb
1. to put (something) into (until there is no room for more); to make full. to fill a cupboard with books; The news filled him with joy.
2. to become full. His eyes filled with tears.
3. to satisfy (a condition, requirement etc). Does he fill all our requirements?
4. to put something in a hole (in a tooth etc) to stop it up. The dentist filled two of my teeth yesterday.
noun
as much as fills or satisfies someone. She ate her fill.
filled adjective
having been filled.
ˈfiller noun
1. a tool or instrument used for filling something, especially for conveying liquid into a bottle.
2. material used to fill cracks in a wall etc.
ˈfilling noun
anything used to fill. The filling has come out of my tooth; He put an orange filling in the cake.
ˈfilling-station noun
a place where petrol is sold.
fill in
1. to add or put in (whatever is needed to make something complete). to fill in the details.
2. to complete (forms, application etc) by putting in the information required. Have you filled in your tax form yet?
3. to give (someone) all the necessary information. I've been away – can you fill me in on what has happened?
4. to occupy (time). She had several cups of coffee at the cafeteria to fill in the time until the train left.
5. to do another person's job temporarily. I'm filling in for her secretary.
fill up
to make or become completely full. Fill up the petrol tank, please.
References in classic literature ?
It was a comfortable room, though the carpet was faded and the furniture very plain, for a good picture or two hung on the walls, books filled the recesses, chrysanthemums and Christmas roses bloomed in the windows, and a pleasant atmosphere of home peace pervaded it.
You can see for yourself how the old man, who had spent all of his life writing and was filled with words, would write hundreds of pages concerning this matter.
For there were a number of canoes filled with the goods of the party, while the members themselves occupied a larger one with their personal baggage.
I carried in cobs and wood from the long cellar, and filled both the stoves.
Now, flanked by its dozen or more cottages, which were always filled with exclusive visitors from the "Quartier Francais," it enabled Madame Lebrun to maintain the easy and comfortable existence which appeared to be her birthright.
But in life --as we have elsewhere seen --this inclined plane is angularly filled up, and almost squared by the enormous superincumbent mass of the junk and sperm.
When her mind gradually filled itself with robins, and moorland cottages crowded with children, with queer crabbed old gardeners and common little Yorkshire housemaids, with springtime and with secret gardens coming alive day by day, and also with a moor boy and his "creatures," there was no room left for the disagreeable thoughts which affected her liver and her digestion and made her yellow and tired.
All night long the people drew on from every side towards the kraal, and, as they came in thousands and tens of thousands, they filled the night with their cries, till it seemed as though the whole world were mourning, and loudly.
Having travelled from land to land in this fashion without finding anything to rivet his attention, it occurred to him to take the form of an eagle, and in this shape he flew across many countries and arrived at length in a new and lovely spot, where the air seemed filled with the scent of jessamine and orange flowers with which the ground was thickly planted.
The fellow looked so fat and hearty, and the wallet on his shoulder seemed so well filled, that Robin thought within himself,
And even if I wish to rise more quickly to the surface, I ship the screw, and the pressure of the water causes the Nautilus to rise vertically like a balloon filled with hydrogen.
Descending into the grotto, he lifted the stone, filled his pockets with gems, put the box together as well and securely as he could, sprinkled fresh sand over the spot from which it had been taken, and then carefully trod down the earth to give it everywhere a uniform appearance; then, quitting the grotto, he replaced the stone, heaping on it broken masses of rocks and rough fragments of crumbling granite, filling the interstices with earth, into which he deftly inserted rapidly growing plants, such as the wild myrtle and flowering thorn, then carefully watering these new plantations, he scrupulously effaced every trace of footsteps, leaving the approach to the cavern as savage-looking and untrodden as he had found it.