film noir


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film noir

(fĭlm′ nwär′)
n. pl. film noirs (fĭlm′ nwärz′, nwär′) or films noirs (fĭlm′ nwär′)
1. A movie characterized by low-key lighting, a bleak urban setting, and corrupt, cynical characters.
2. The genre or style of such movies.

[French : film, film (from English film; see film) + noir, black (from Old French, from Latin niger, nigr-; see nekw-t- in Indo-European roots).]

film noir

(nwɑː)
n
(Film) a gangster thriller, made esp in the 1940s in Hollywood characterized by contrasty lighting and often somewhat impenetrable plots
[C20: French, literally: black film]

film′ noir′


n.
1. a motion picture genre marked by grim urban settings, cynical, bleakly pessimistic characters, and starkly shadowed photography.
2. a motion picture in this genre.
[1955–60; < French: literally, black film]

film noir

1. A French phrase meaning black film, used to mean the type of moody gangster movies made in the 1940s.
2. Moody style of gangster or thriller film, often shot in dark contrasting images.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.film noir - a movie that is marked by a mood of pessimism, fatalism, menace, and cynical characters; "film noir was applied by French critics to describe American thriller or detective films in the 1940s"
motion picture, motion-picture show, movie, moving picture, moving-picture show, pic, film, picture show, flick, picture - a form of entertainment that enacts a story by sound and a sequence of images giving the illusion of continuous movement; "they went to a movie every Saturday night"; "the film was shot on location"
References in periodicals archive ?
However, film noir seems to have a peculiar fascination for painted portraits of women; in one of the first key texts on film noir, Raymond Durgnat mentioned their importance as one of many forms of doubling.
He consistently argues in Fatalism in American Film Noir for a gap between characters' self-understanding and their actions, which complicates the plots.
IF you thought that Get Carter was the first so-called film noir based in Newcastle, think again.
With the works of Academy Award-winning directors Billy Wilder and Orson Welles, this timeless collection will entertain classic film fans and introduce a whole new generation to the iconic film noir style of filmmaking.
Film noir FAQ; all that's left to know about Hollywood's golden age of dames, detectives, and danger.
Any fan of film noir style who wants more than a casual survey will find this a key reference packing in over 3,500 movie entries that include both classic U.
Film noir (French for "black film") is a cinematic term used primarily to describe stylish crime dramas, particularly those that emphasize cynical attitudes and sexual motivations.
Pippin sets out to examine the theme of fatalism in film noir, which he explains as follows: "Some philosophers believe that if the question is: What distinguishes naturally occurring events like bodily movements in space from metaphysically distinct purposive doings initiated by me, the answer is: Nothing" (13).
What film noir texts appear to have in common is that they are marked by the eruption of physical violence or, more precisely, the discourse of law and criminality.
com) The film noir post modern independent feature stars Nikki Reed, of the Fox Television Network's "The OC", who is also co-author and star of the highly acclaimed right of passage feature film "Thirteen".
This fifteen-minute loop is based on Robert Aldrich's remarkable 1955 film noir, Kiss Me Deadly.
Set in the bitter cold landscape surrounding Lake Winnipeg, Kanadiana is a film noir, Fargo-esque thriller that tells the story of two brothers who head north to lie low after a diamond heist, and wind up following a runaway waitress who unknowingly ends up with the diamonds stashed in the back of her truck.