films


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film

 (fĭlm)
n.
1. A thin skin or membrane.
2. A thin, opaque, abnormal coating on the cornea of the eye.
3. A thin covering or coating: a film of dust on the piano.
4. A thin, flexible, transparent sheet, as of plastic, used in wrapping or packaging.
5.
a. A thin sheet or strip of flexible material, such as a cellulose derivative or a thermoplastic resin, coated with a photosensitive emulsion and used to make photographic negatives or transparencies.
b. A thin sheet or strip of developed photographic negatives or transparencies.
6.
a. A movie, especially one recorded on film.
b. The presentation of such a work.
c. A long, narrative movie.
d. Movies collectively, especially when considered as an art form.
v. filmed, film·ing, films
v.tr.
1. To cover with or as if with a film.
2. To record on film or video using a movie camera: film a rocket launch; film a scene from a ballet.
v.intr.
1. To become coated or obscured with or as if with a film: The window filmed over with moisture.
2. To make or shoot scenes for a movie.

[Middle English, from Old English filmen; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

Films

See also photography.

special effects, extras, and the like used in order to establish an intended background or mood for a film.
1. a film projector of the early 20th century.
2. British. a motion-picture theater.
the art or principles of making motion pictures.
the art or technique of motion-picture photography. — cinematographer, cinematographist, n. — cinematographic, adj.
language typical of the cinema, as that used in film dialogue or in film criticism.
avid moviegoing. — cinephile, n., adj.
a motion-picture camera.
an early name for a cinema, so called because of the five-cent admission charge. See also music.
an instrument that represents the effect of moving images on a screen.
the writer of scenarios, story lines for motion pictures.
a type of kinescope that presents the effect of moving pictures by use of a rotating glass plate with images attached to it.
an early form of motion-picture projector.
an early form of motion-picture projector.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Her gown was of a soft white silky stuff that clung to her round young figure like a fish's skin, and it was rippled over with the gracefulest little fringy films of lace; she had deep, tender eyes, with long, curved lashes; and she had peachy cheeks, and a dimpled chin, and such a dear little rosebud of a mouth; and she was so dovelike, so pure, and so gracious, so sweet and so bewitching.
She who had been married for years and had borne two children without ever having had the joy of one overwhelming kiss, would find romance at last, for an hour, as she identified herself with the charming heroines of the films.
and the goggle-eyed perch, of throwing a film over his eyes, rendering opaque the windows of his soul.
Do what he would, and love me though he did, the light left his face ever and again, and a film came over the placid look at the white ceiling.
Surface, is woman's soul, a mobile, stormy film on shallow water.
Diana was standing nervously in the middle of the room, arrayed in her bridal white, her black curls frosted over with the film of her wedding veil.
Then I guessed what the film was--/Twala's body was being transformed into a stalactite.
Fell from their eyes then the film through which they had looked at victory.
He knew that a yearning glance fell upon him, now and then, through a film of tears, but he refused recognition of it.
But the Nightingale's voice grew fainter, and her little wings began to beat, and a film came over her eyes.
The eyes revealed themselves, bright with the glassy film of death--and fixed their dreadful look on the woman in the chair.
I attempted to accompany them and proceeded a short distance from the house, but my head whirled round, my steps were like those of a drunken man, I fell at last in a state of utter exhaustion; a film covered my eyes, and my skin was parched with the heat of fever.