fine arts


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fine art

 (fīn)
n.
1.
a. Art produced or intended primarily for beauty rather than utility.
b. often fine arts Any of the art forms, such as sculpture, painting, or music, used to create such art.
2. Something requiring highly developed techniques and skills: the fine art of teaching.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fine arts - the study and creation of visual works of artfine arts - the study and creation of visual works of art
painting - creating a picture with paints; "he studied painting and sculpture for many years"
sculpture, carving - creating figures or designs in three dimensions
texture - the characteristic appearance of a surface having a tactile quality
architecture - the discipline dealing with the principles of design and construction and ornamentation of fine buildings; "architecture and eloquence are mixed arts whose end is sometimes beauty and sometimes use"
arts, humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts - studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills); "the college of arts and sciences"
reproduce - recreate a sound, image, idea, mood, atmosphere, etc.; "this DVD player reproduces the sound of the piano very well"; "He reproduced the feeling of sadness in the portrait"
classical, classic - of or relating to the most highly developed stage of an earlier civilisation and its culture; "classic Cinese pottery"
nonclassical - not classical
Translations
Bildende Kunst
képzőművészet

fine arts

npl the fine arts(le) belle arti fpl
References in classic literature ?
But there is a lightness about the feminine mind--a touch and go--music, the fine arts, that kind of thing--they should study those up to a certain point, women should; but in a light way, you know.
The most thoroughgoing of all distinctions in literature, as in the other Fine Arts, is that between (1) Substance, the essential content and meaning of the work, and (2) Form, the manner in which it is expressed (including narrative structure, external style, in poetry verse-form, and many related matters).
The man of the Fancy Repository and Brompton Emporium of Fine Arts (of whom she bought the screens, vainly hoping that he would repurchase them when ornamented by her hand) can hardly hide the sneer with which he examines these feeble works of art.
Her father had given her the best masters in philosophy, medicine, history and the fine arts, and besides all this, her beauty excelled that of any girl in the kingdom of Persia.
This appears in works both of the useful and the fine arts, if we employ the popular distinction of works according to their aim either at use or beauty.
This commodious ottoman has since been removed, to the extreme regret of all weak-kneed lovers of the fine arts, but the gentleman in question had taken serene possession of its softest spot, and, with his head thrown back and his legs outstretched, was staring at Murillo's beautiful moon-borne Madonna in profound enjoyment of his posture.
I cannot but perceive that this so-called rich and refined life is a thing jumped at, and I do not get on in the enjoyment of the fine arts which adorn it, my attention being wholly occupied with the jump; for I remember that the greatest genuine leap, due to human muscles alone, on record, is that of certain wandering Arabs, who are said to have cleared twenty-five feet on level ground.
Melville was much interested in all matters relating to the fine arts, and devoted most of his leisure hours to the two subjects.
Perhaps the reason I used to enjoy going to the Academy of Fine Arts in New York was because there were but a few hundred paintings in it, and it did not surfeit me to go through the list.
He described his indifference to politics, his love of study, of the fine arts, of science, and of flowers.
He had availed himself, in this heavy undertaking, of the experience of a certain wandering eastern mechanic, who, by exhibiting a few soiled plates of English architecture, and talking learnedly of friezes, entablatures, and particularly of the composite order, had obtained a very undue influence over Richard’s taste in everything that pertained to that branch of the fine arts.
His imagination invested her with the taste for the fine arts which ho required from a wife, and he married her in her first season, only to discover that the amativeness in her temperament was so little and languid that she made all his attempts at fondness ridiculous, and robbed the caresses for which he had longed of all their anticipated ecstasy.