finesse

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fi·nesse

 (fə-nĕs′)
n.
1. Refinement and delicacy of performance, execution, or artisanship.
2. Skillful, subtle handling of a situation; tactful, diplomatic maneuvering.
3. A method of leading up to a tenace, as in bridge, in order to prevent an opponent from winning the trick with an intermediate card.
4. A stratagem in which one appears to decline an advantage.
v. fi·nessed, fi·ness·ing, fi·ness·es
v.tr.
1. To accomplish by the use of finesse.
2. To handle with a deceptive or evasive strategy.
3. To play (a card) as a finesse.
v.intr.
1. To use finesse.
2. To make a finesse in cards.

[French, fineness, subtlety, from fin, fine; see fine1.]

finesse

(fɪˈnɛs)
n
1. elegant skill in style or performance
2. subtlety and tact in handling difficult situations
3. (Card Games) bridge whist an attempt to win a trick when opponents hold a high card in the suit led by playing a lower card, hoping the opponent who has already played holds the missing card
4. a trick, artifice, or strategy
vb
5. to manage or bring about with finesse
6. (Card Games) to play (a card) as a finesse
[C15: from Old French, from fin fine, delicate; see fine1]

fi•nesse

(fɪˈnɛss)

n., v. -nessed, -ness•ing. n.
1. extreme delicacy or subtlety in performance, skill, discrimination, etc.
2. skill and adroitness in handling a difficult or highly sensitive situation.
3. a trick, artifice, or stratagem.
4. an attempt to win a trick in bridge with a card lower than one in an opponent's hand.
v.i.
5. to use finesse or artifice.
6. to make a finesse at cards.
v.t.
7. to bring about by finesse or artifice.
8. to avoid; circumvent.
9. to make a finesse with (a card).
10. to force the playing of (a card) by a finesse.
[1400–50; late Middle English: degree of excellence or purity < Middle French < Vulgar Latin *fīnitia. See fine1, -ice]

finesse


Past participle: finessed
Gerund: finessing

Imperative
finesse
finesse
Present
I finesse
you finesse
he/she/it finesses
we finesse
you finesse
they finesse
Preterite
I finessed
you finessed
he/she/it finessed
we finessed
you finessed
they finessed
Present Continuous
I am finessing
you are finessing
he/she/it is finessing
we are finessing
you are finessing
they are finessing
Present Perfect
I have finessed
you have finessed
he/she/it has finessed
we have finessed
you have finessed
they have finessed
Past Continuous
I was finessing
you were finessing
he/she/it was finessing
we were finessing
you were finessing
they were finessing
Past Perfect
I had finessed
you had finessed
he/she/it had finessed
we had finessed
you had finessed
they had finessed
Future
I will finesse
you will finesse
he/she/it will finesse
we will finesse
you will finesse
they will finesse
Future Perfect
I will have finessed
you will have finessed
he/she/it will have finessed
we will have finessed
you will have finessed
they will have finessed
Future Continuous
I will be finessing
you will be finessing
he/she/it will be finessing
we will be finessing
you will be finessing
they will be finessing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been finessing
you have been finessing
he/she/it has been finessing
we have been finessing
you have been finessing
they have been finessing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been finessing
you will have been finessing
he/she/it will have been finessing
we will have been finessing
you will have been finessing
they will have been finessing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been finessing
you had been finessing
he/she/it had been finessing
we had been finessing
you had been finessing
they had been finessing
Conditional
I would finesse
you would finesse
he/she/it would finesse
we would finesse
you would finesse
they would finesse
Past Conditional
I would have finessed
you would have finessed
he/she/it would have finessed
we would have finessed
you would have finessed
they would have finessed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.finesse - subtly skillful handling of a situation
tact, tactfulness - consideration in dealing with others and avoiding giving offense

finesse

noun
2. stratagem, trick, manoeuvre, bluff, ruse, artifice, feint, wile Declarer was planning to take a finesse in spades.
verb
1. manoeuvre, steer, manipulate, bluff a typical politician trying to finesse a sticky situation

finesse

verb
1. To make, achieve, or get through contrivance or guile:
Informal: finagle, wangle.
2. To outmaneuver (an opponent), especially with the aid of some extra resource:
Informal: one-up.
Translations
أناقَه
obratnost
diplomatidygtighedsnilde
finesz
fágun, snilli, kunnátta
diplomatiškumas
smalkumstaktiskums

finesse

[fɪˈnes]
A. N
1. (in judgement) → finura f, delicadeza f; (in action) → diplomacia f, sutileza f; (= cunning) → astucia f
2. (Cards) → impasse m
B. VThacer el impasse a

finesse

[fɪˈnɛs] nfinesse ffine-tooth comb n
to go through sth with a fine-tooth comb (fig)passer qch au peigne fin
He went through the documents with a fine-tooth comb → Il a passé les documents au peigne fin.fine-tune [ˌfaɪnˈtjuːn] vt [+ plan, production, the economy] → régler avec précisionfine-tuning [ˌfaɪnˈtjuːnɪŋ] nréglage m minutieux

finesse

n
(= skill, diplomacy)Gewandtheit f, → Geschick nt
(= cunning)Schlauheit f, → Finesse f
(Cards) → Schneiden nt
vi (Cards) → schneiden
vt
(= do with finesse) problemgeschickt lösen; (= avoid)ausweichen (+dat)
(Cards) → schneiden

finesse

[fɪˈnɛs] nfinezza (Cards) → impasse f

finesse

(fines) noun
cleverness and skill in dealing with a situation etc. She managed that situation with great finesse.
References in classic literature ?
But the matter is of such importance, that one must passer par-dessus toutes ces finesses de sentiment.
Perhaps Catherine was wrong in not demanding the cause of that gentle emotion -- but she was not experienced enough in the finesse of love, or the duties of friendship, to know when delicate raillery was properly called for, or when a confidence should be forced.
Now the beautiful Eudosia--for beautiful, and even lovely, this glorious- looking creature was, in spite of a very badly modulated voice, certain inroads upon the fitness of things in the way of expression, and a want of a knowledge of the finesse of fine life--now the beautiful Eudosia had an intimate friend named Clara Caverly, who was as unlike her as possible, in character, education, habits, and appearance; and yet who was firmly her friend.
He could not be an assassin, and it was repugnant to Monk to believe him to be a spy, but there was sufficient finesse and at the same time firmness in Athos to lead Monk to fancy he was a conspirator.