fir


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FIR

abbr.
far-infrared radiation

fir

 (fûr)
n.
1.
a. Any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies, having linear flattened needles and erect cones with deciduous scales.
b. Any of several similar or related trees, such as the Douglas fir.
2. The wood of any these trees.

[Middle English firre, probably of Scandinavian origin; see perkwu- in Indo-European roots.]

fir′ry adj.

fir

(fɜː)
n
1. (Plants) any pyramidal coniferous tree of the N temperate genus Abies, having single needle-like leaves and erect cones: family Pinaceae. See also red fir, silver fir, balsam fir
2. (Plants) any of various other trees of the family Pinaceae, such as the Douglas fir
3. (Plants) the wood of any of these trees
[Old English furh; related to Old Norse fura, Old High German foraha fir, Latin quercus oak]

fir

(fɜr)

n.
1. any evergreen tree of the genus Abies, of the pine family, having flat needles and erect cones.
2. the wood of such a tree.
[1250–1300; Middle English firre, Old English fyrh]
click for a larger image
fir
Douglas firs can attain heights of more than 200 feet (61 meters).

fir

(fûr)
Any of various evergreen trees that have flat needles and bear cones. Firs generally grow in northern regions or at higher altitudes.
pine, fir, spruce - Pine, fir, and spruce are quite different from each other, though they are all conifers; pine has clusters of long, needle-shaped leaves, spruce is a type of fir, and the only scientific difference between the two is that spruces have rectangular needles while firs have flat, needle-shaped leaves.
See also related terms for pine.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fir - nonresinous wood of a fir treefir - nonresinous wood of a fir tree  
fir tree, true fir, fir - any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies; chiefly of upland areas
douglas fir - strong durable timber of a douglas fir
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.fir - any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abiesfir - any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies; chiefly of upland areas
Abies, genus Abies - true firs
fir - nonresinous wood of a fir tree
silver fir - any of various true firs having leaves white or silvery white beneath
Abies bracteata, Abies venusta, bristlecone fir, Santa Lucia fir - a pyramidal fir of southwestern California having spiny pointed leaves and cone scales with long spines
fir cone - the seed-producing cone of a fir tree
conifer, coniferous tree - any gymnospermous tree or shrub bearing cones
Translations
تَنّوب، شَجَرَة الميلاد
jedle
grangrantræ
abio
nulg
pihta
jela
erdeifenyõfenyő
òinur
eglė
egle
brad
jedľa
jelka

fir

[fɜːʳ]
A. N (also fir tree) → abeto m
B. CPD fir cone Npiña f

fir

[ˈfɜːr] fir tree nsapin m

fir

nTanne f; (= wood)Tanne (→ nholz nt) f

fir

[fɜːʳ] n (also fir tree) → abete m

fir

(fəː) noun
a kind of evergreen tree that bears cones (ˈfir-cones) and is often grown for its wood.
References in classic literature ?
At the end of a year he had shot up a good deal, and after another year he was another long bit taller; for with fir trees one can always tell by the shoots how many years old they are.
Behind it, sheltering its garden from the too keen breath of sea winds, was a cloudy fir wood, in which the winds might make all kinds of weird and haunting music.
The coarse evergreen color of the small fir trees scattered here and there among the birches was an unpleasant reminder of winter.
Here they advanced as noiselessly as possible, lest keepers or other enemies should be about, and stopped at the foot of a tall fir, at the top of which Martin pointed out with pride the kestrel's nest, the object of their quest.
They lived with their Mother in a sand-bank, underneath the root of a very big fir tree.
In Staffordshire, on the estate of a relation where I had ample means of investigation, there was a large and extremely barren heath, which had never been touched by the hand of man; but several hundred acres of exactly the same nature had been enclosed twenty-five years previously and planted with Scotch fir.
She had discovered that a lane opened out below the apple orchard and ran up through a belt of woodland; and she had explored it to its furthest end in all its delicious vagaries of brook and bridge, fir coppice and wild cherry arch, corners thick with fern, and branching byways of maple and mountain ash.
A weird, dreamy stillness had fallen on the purple earth, the dark fir woods, the valley rims, the sere meadows.
Arthur's shadow flitted rather faster among the sturdy oaks of the Chase than might have been expected from the shadow of a tired man on a warm afternoon, and it was still scarcely four o'clock when he stood before the tall narrow gate leading into the delicious labyrinthine wood which skirted one side of the Chase, and which was called Fir-tree Grove, not because the firs were many, but because they were few.
With an instinct as to possibilities he did not now, as he had intended, make for the first station beyond the town, but plunged still farther under the firs, which here abounded for miles.
The emphasis was helped by the speaker's hair, which bristled on the skirts of his bald head, a plantation of firs to keep the wind from its shining surface, all covered with knobs, like the crust of a plum pie, as if the head had scarcely warehouse-room for the hard facts stored inside.
Near the top of this hill, about two miles from Linden-Car, stood Wildfell Hall, a superannuated mansion of the Elizabethan era, built of dark grey stone, venerable and picturesque to look at, but doubtless, cold and gloomy enough to inhabit, with its thick stone mullions and little latticed panes, its time-eaten air-holes, and its too lonely, too unsheltered situation, - only shielded from the war of wind and weather by a group of Scotch firs, themselves half blighted with storms, and looking as stern and gloomy as the Hall itself.